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Beowulf

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NEWS
April 9, 2000
"Beowulf" is a marvelous story that I worked at for five years. I came to love it. . . . I studied at university. I loved the Anglo-Saxon language. I especially loved the ethos of the poem, where it's full of understatement, full of people who knew they can't expect much, full of people that are veterans of awareness, that the world is full of danger, but that you must conduct yourself with decorum and grace and not bloody well complain. . . . There is a moment in ["Beowulf"] which is fantastically contemporary.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Daily News
"Beowulf" originally was going to arrive in theaters in two radically different versions. The PG-13 cut would play in regular theaters; an unrated version would play in IMAX 3-D theaters. The MPAA shot down that idea, citing the rule that forbids studios to release different-rated versions of movies simultaneously. It would cause confusion, the thinking goes. But, sporting a digitally nude Angelina Jolie and plenty of blood-spurting violence, "Beowulf" still seems to be causing its fair share of bewilderment outside the box-office.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A Looney Tunes 300, Robert Zemeckis' multi-format adaptation (3-D or not 3-D? Imax or not Imax? - these are the questions) of the crusty Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf offers buxom serving wenches, swarthy warriors and the unwittingly hilarious sight of its hero - the great Geat soldier, Beowulf - in a naked wrestling match with the slimy, wailing, 20-foot monster, Grendel. In order to keep its PG-13 rating intact - and not to offend the delicate sensibilities of teenage gamer Geats, I mean geeks - the film provides a big sword, or a beam, or a helmet, or a passing tray of mead, to obscure our vaulting, somersaulting, unclad hero's private parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1998 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Be aware right off that if you go to Beowulf, you won't understand a word of it. But be assured that the show's incomprehensibility isn't a reason not to attend. The ancient epic poem about the hero Beowulf's battle with the warrior-eating monster Grendel is delivered in the original Anglo-Saxon. Don't think that because Anglo-Saxon is a precursor of English, you will pick up enough to understand what's going on. You won't. Spoken Anglo-Saxon will be as foreign to you as any other language you haven't learned.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | By LAURA RANDALL For the Daily News
When Angelina Jolie agreed to play Grendel's mother in the film version of "Beowulf," she was more interested in working with veteran director Robert Zemeckis than in being a part of the epic poem that she vaguely remembers reading as a teenager. "I was going to work with Bob Zemeckis, so I was pretty much saying yes to anything," she said. Then she found out she was playing a lizard. Then things got really strange. Zemeckis, director of "Forrest Gump" and the "Back to the Future" films, took her into a room lined with enlarged photos and examples of his vision of what the femme fatale looked like - which was basically a naked Jolie dripping with gold and swinging a braided red tail that seemed to stretch for miles.
NEWS
March 14, 2000 | By Marc Schogol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a book that few know, fewer have actually read, and fewer still teach. So Sister Elaine Glanz couldn't help laughing about how, 1,000 years after it was written, Beowulf has become a best-seller. "We're on the cutting edge of the 10th century. It's a riot," said Sister Elaine, who teaches Beowulf at Chester County's Immaculata College - one of a dwindling number of area schools that do offer it. Nevertheless, a new, high-profile translation of the Old English epic just made the cover of the New York Times Book Review.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
I saw "Beowulf" earlier this week in IMAX 3-D, until Angelina Jolie appeared nude, when I think the format changed to IMAX 36-D. Yo^outhae, as they used to say in A.D. 600 Scandinavia. Loosely translated, it means "Yowza. " Be it known this new animated "Beowulf" is certainly not the epic poem you don't remember from your English lit course. It's been converted by Robert Zemeckis into a wacky pop-lit hybrid that combines "Lord of the Rings" nerd appeal with Viking-movie brio, seasoned with naughty bits.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Daily News
Maybe the best line in Woody Allen's "Annie Hall" came when Diane Keaton told Allen she wanted to look into taking some college classes. "Just don't take any course where you have to read 'Beowulf,' " Allen warns her. Screenwriter Roger Avary knows the feeling, having, like most American high-school students, battled "Beowulf" in English lit class. Being a Dungeons & Dragons geek, Avary figured he'd love any tale involving swords and monsters, but his 17-year-old brain couldn't wrap itself around the Old English verse.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
The Viking Statue on Kelly Drive wears a sombrero while Temple senior Mary Jo Martino reads the Old English epic "Beowulf" at the base yesterday. The statue is of Thorfinn Karlsefni, who was said to have followed Leif Ericson and founded a colony on Cape Cod.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 18, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John T. Kelly, 71, an English literature teacher at West Chester University from 1968 to 2000, died of a brain tumor Aug. 11 at St. Joseph's Villa, a nursing home in Overland Park, Kan. Born in Yukon, Okla., he graduated from high school there in 1955. He earned a bachelor's degree in English from St. Louis University in 1959 and a doctorate in medieval literature in 1968 from the University of Oklahoma. His niece Katy FitzGerald said Mr. Kelly spent his teaching career at West Chester, during which, for nine summers, he took students to Oxford, England, where he taught such classics as Beowulf and The Canterbury Tales.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2007 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Local gal ties up best-wrapper prize Janet Smith, 65, of Willow Grove came from behind the counter of Bloomingdale's yesterday and onto a stage in New York's Rockefeller Center to win $10,000 and the title "Most Gifted Wrapper" in a contest sponsored by 3M, the company that makes Scotch brand tape. Smith, a grandmother-to-be, successfully wrapped a snowboard with boots and binding and an 8-foot snowmobile faster and better than six other contestants from around the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Daily News
"Beowulf" originally was going to arrive in theaters in two radically different versions. The PG-13 cut would play in regular theaters; an unrated version would play in IMAX 3-D theaters. The MPAA shot down that idea, citing the rule that forbids studios to release different-rated versions of movies simultaneously. It would cause confusion, the thinking goes. But, sporting a digitally nude Angelina Jolie and plenty of blood-spurting violence, "Beowulf" still seems to be causing its fair share of bewilderment outside the box-office.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Daily News
Maybe the best line in Woody Allen's "Annie Hall" came when Diane Keaton told Allen she wanted to look into taking some college classes. "Just don't take any course where you have to read 'Beowulf,' " Allen warns her. Screenwriter Roger Avary knows the feeling, having, like most American high-school students, battled "Beowulf" in English lit class. Being a Dungeons & Dragons geek, Avary figured he'd love any tale involving swords and monsters, but his 17-year-old brain couldn't wrap itself around the Old English verse.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | By LAURA RANDALL For the Daily News
When Angelina Jolie agreed to play Grendel's mother in the film version of "Beowulf," she was more interested in working with veteran director Robert Zemeckis than in being a part of the epic poem that she vaguely remembers reading as a teenager. "I was going to work with Bob Zemeckis, so I was pretty much saying yes to anything," she said. Then she found out she was playing a lizard. Then things got really strange. Zemeckis, director of "Forrest Gump" and the "Back to the Future" films, took her into a room lined with enlarged photos and examples of his vision of what the femme fatale looked like - which was basically a naked Jolie dripping with gold and swinging a braided red tail that seemed to stretch for miles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A Looney Tunes 300, Robert Zemeckis' multi-format adaptation (3-D or not 3-D? Imax or not Imax? - these are the questions) of the crusty Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf offers buxom serving wenches, swarthy warriors and the unwittingly hilarious sight of its hero - the great Geat soldier, Beowulf - in a naked wrestling match with the slimy, wailing, 20-foot monster, Grendel. In order to keep its PG-13 rating intact - and not to offend the delicate sensibilities of teenage gamer Geats, I mean geeks - the film provides a big sword, or a beam, or a helmet, or a passing tray of mead, to obscure our vaulting, somersaulting, unclad hero's private parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
I saw "Beowulf" earlier this week in IMAX 3-D, until Angelina Jolie appeared nude, when I think the format changed to IMAX 36-D. Yo^outhae, as they used to say in A.D. 600 Scandinavia. Loosely translated, it means "Yowza. " Be it known this new animated "Beowulf" is certainly not the epic poem you don't remember from your English lit course. It's been converted by Robert Zemeckis into a wacky pop-lit hybrid that combines "Lord of the Rings" nerd appeal with Viking-movie brio, seasoned with naughty bits.
NEWS
November 15, 2007 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What does Beowulf have in common with brussels sprouts? You know the eighth-century epic is culturally nutritious, but boy, is it hard to get down - especially since it's written in Old English, which is unintelligible to modern readers. Some lit majors whine that Beowulf, which was composed between 700 and 750 by Anglo-Saxon bards and is considered England's first masterpiece, is boring, lame. Un-sexy. Try telling that to Angelina Jolie, who sexes up the saga plenty with her scene-stealing, if unintentionally comic, turn as a super-seductive, nude dragon lady in Robert Zemeckis' $70 million Beowulf, which opens tomorrow.
NEWS
November 30, 2006 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
The drumbeat cut through the silence of the autumn night as the ceremony began. The tribes stood on top of the hill, overlooking the bonfire. Clad in leather and furs, their tribal costumes, they had gathered at the sound of the drum. The orange flames pierced the darkness, illuminating the dozens of spectators. Following the drummer, the tribes descended, circling the fire beneath their distinct banners as the king took his seat on his throne. This was the scene at Valley Forge Military College in Wayne the night of Nov. 14. A tribal ceremony around a bonfire?
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