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Berlin Wall

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NEWS
June 21, 1988 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters and the New York Daily News
As Michael Jackson was singing on one side of the Berlin Wall, havoc reportedly was playing on the other. Witnesses said yesterday that East German security forces used electric cattle prods to attack camera crews and youths gathered near the Berlin Wall Sunday to hear the pop star's concert about 200 yards away in West Berlin. The trouble apparently broke out when shouts of "The wall must go" wafted from the crowd of about 5,000 gathered at the wall. Sources said that the protesters were encircled quickly, and that some were dragged off by the hair.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Those tiny chunks of the Berlin Wall are hot items in some area department stores this season. But they're not hot with hazardous asbestos, as far as tests by Philadelphia's city air pollution lab have been able to find. Unlike a piece of the wall tested recently in Oklahoma, a sample of the stuff being sold in stores in Philadelphia came up clean. "We didn't find any signs of asbestos in the sample you gave us," said Morris Fine, a city health official, after chemists tested a bite-sized fragment supplied by the Daily News this week.
NEWS
December 12, 1989 | By Susan Bennett, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this article
Secretary of State James A. Baker 3d reassured concerned British leaders yesterday and then flew to West Berlin for a symbolic visit to the Berlin Wall and the unveiling of a U.S. vision for a restructured Europe. As Baker arrived in West Berlin last night, more than 100,000 pro-democracy demonstrators rallied in Leipzig, East Germany, for the fourth straight week, with many calling for German unity but others loudly protesting the idea. And the four World War II allies who control the divided city of Berlin held their first meeting in 18 years yesterday and stressed the need for stability at a time of convulsive change in East Germany, where the Communist Party has lost power.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some raised glasses of schnapps and beer. Others could only stare for hours at television newscasts, weeping with joy at the poignant scenes they saw. Either way, Thursday was an unforgettable day of celebration for Northeast Philadelphia's German-American population. In a move that was shocking in its suddenness, East German officials threw open their nation's borders for the first time in 28 years. Symbolically, at least, the Berlin Wall was no more. "It was amazing. I went through a lot of tears," said Dorothea Oesterreich, who left East Germany a few months before the wall was built in 1961.
NEWS
August 13, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
President Reagan yesterday branded the Berlin Wall a symbol of failure for communism and a source of tension in Europe, and the Soviet Union formally objected to protests against the wall scheduled for today. In a statement released in West Berlin to mark today's 25th anniversary of the beginning of construction of the Berlin Wall, Reagan said: "The Berlin Wall is tragic proof of the failure of totalitarian governments. It is the most visible sign of the unnatural division of Germany and Europe, a division which cruelly separates East from West and divides families and friends.
NEWS
November 18, 1991 | By Laurie Halse Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
When the Berlin Wall was broken down two years ago, thousands of tiny pieces were chiseled off and sold to collectors and curiosity hounds - and to Germans around the world who treasured them as symbols of their nation's reunification. But a German-American social club in Warminster has a somewhat bigger reminder. While most people came away from the wall with concrete chips, the Vereinigung Erzgebirge has a veritable boulder, a three-ton, 11-foot-high Gedenkstein (commemorative stone)
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | By Ray Moseley, Chicago Tribune
Millions of Germans will celebrate Friday what most people have long supposed was a Communist Party decision to bring down the Berlin Wall. But that isn't what happened. There was never a decision by East Germany's communist leadership to allow the kind of unrestricted travel to the West that occurred on the night of last Nov. 9 and subsequently. One of the most momentous events in Europe's postwar history came about not so much by design as by mistakes and confusion inside a party leadership that was trying desperately to find a way to save itself from a popular revolution.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
While workmen rushed about putting the final touches on the mottled pink marble lobby of the elegant new Maritim Hotel, one of its managers extolled it as the best location in the West German capital. "The building on the left is the Postal Ministry," exclaimed Ralf H. Bittner, gesturing to the stone-and-glass towers still under construction to the east. "And the one next to it is the Transport Ministry, and there's the Justice Ministry, and those two big new buildings on the right are the Science and Research Ministries.
NEWS
July 2, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
More than 180 West Berlin squatters yesterday scrambled over the Berlin Wall to East Germany to escape police in a scene unprecedented since the barrier was erected in 1961. West Berlin police had chased the squatters from a disputed piece of land near the wall the after a monthlong struggle that had pitted environmentalists against city developers. When the removal order came, the squatters found an unusual escape route - over the wall and into the city's communist side. Police and witnesses said that rather than face eviction and identity checks, the protesters climbed up makeshift ladders they set against the high concrete wall.
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia migrated for the first time in its own subscription series Sunday from its usual Perelman Theater quarters to the larger Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center, and with good reason: Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 . It's a piece that needs more room. Also significant, conductor laureate Ignat Solzhenitsyn (a much-seasoned Beethovenian) returned to conduct a smaller-scale, gently provocative performance that reminded you how seldom the composer's grandest symphony is heard with fine nuances.
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NEWS
August 10, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Obama's performance lacking, too What a crazy world we live in when President Obama's popularity soars as he criticizes Donald Trump ("As Obama targets Trump, support rises," Sunday). Meanwhile, there's the worsening condition of Obamacare ("Affordable Care Act's own health is failing," Sunday). Thirteen of the original 23 co-ops that were a centerpiece of the plan that the president and then-House Speaker Nancy Pelosi forced down the throats of the American people have failed, and three others are closing up shop.
NEWS
February 21, 2016
By Darryl Pinckney Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 304 pp. $26 Reviewed by Mike Fischer Jed Goodfinch, the protagonist of Darryl Pinckney's Black Deutschland , is a gay expatriate in 1980s Berlin. In the first paragraph, Goodfinch - after conjuring the ghost of Christopher Isherwood, another gay man who went to Berlin in search of himself - cops to a vision of Berlin as a place featuring "white boys who wanted to atone for Germany's crimes by loving a black boy like me. " In his native Chicago, Goodfinch has dropped out of college, disappointing his Hyde Park parents, and gone through drug and alcohol rehab.
NEWS
December 22, 2015
Kurt Masur, 88, a renowned conductor who led the New York Philharmonic for 11 years and played a crucial peacemaking role in the weeks before the collapse of communism and the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, died Saturday at a hospital in Greenwich, Conn. He had complications from Parkinson's disease, the New York Philharmonic said in a statement. Mr. Masur spent much of his career in communist-controlled East Germany, gaining international renown as music director of Leipzig's Gewandhaus Orchestra.
TRAVEL
November 16, 2015 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
BUCHAREST, Romania - This isn't the first city Americans think of visiting on a European vacation. During the Iron Curtain years, Romania was an elusory country known for turning out Olympic gymnasts and for steering an independent, yet totalitarian, course from the rest of the Soviet Bloc. Tourism was not a priority. The breach of the Berlin Wall in 1989 set off a chain of relatively peaceful transitions to freedom through most of Eastern Europe. Romania, however, endured violent protests in which more than 1,000 people were killed, leading to the Christmas Day execution of dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife, Elena.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
His cell sat directly above the torture chamber in the East German prison, Frederic Pryor recalled, but he didn't know it at the time. He only knew that he could occasionally hear screams. Of the international Cold War drama that swirled outside the jailhouse walls, and the chance it could spark his freedom, he knew nothing, kept in the dark by his communist captors. Now, everyone knows. The new Steven Spielberg movie, Bridge of Spies , tells the tense, true story of how the United States and the Soviet Union traded spy for spy at a moment when each nation threatened the nuclear annihilation of the other.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph V. Cacciutti, 77, of Gladwyne, owner and operator of his family's foundry for many years, died Tuesday, Feb. 24, of a stroke at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Cacciutti was the CEO and chairman of West Philadelphia Bronze Corp., a bronze foundry and one of the leading national manufacturers of large castings for the shipbuilding industry. The business was established in 1947 in West Philadelphia by his father, Ralph Cacciutti, and uncle, Charles Cacciutti, both now deceased. In 1986, the firm moved to Chester, Delaware County, after acquiring the Crown Foundry there.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall is a good time to reflect on the dimming regard for democratic government - at home and abroad. Nov. 9, 1989, the day that East Berliners scaled the wall and embraced their fellow Germans from the West, marked the zenith of global faith in democracy's promise, shortly before the communist empire collapsed. I was lucky enough to witness East Europe's democratic uprisings firsthand. In November 1989, in East Germany, I watched tens of thousands of peaceful demonstrators in Leipzig roar for a united, democratic Germany, in a series of Monday protests that helped seal East Germany's fate.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | By Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
I was strolling along Bernauer Strasse during a foggy night typical of Berlin. The low-lying mist shrouded the streetlamps, casting sepia shadows on the neighborhood. The hues were reminiscent of old newsreels from August 1963, when this street became a last-gasp escape route for those seeking to flee over the Berlin Wall, a structure that was erected overnight in its initial crude form of concrete blocks and barbed wire. It encircled West Berlin to keep East Germans from escaping to the lone outpost of freedom behind the Iron Curtain.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Scott Wilson, Washington Post
BERLIN - President Obama on Wednesday called for reducing the number of deployed U.S. strategic nuclear warheads by one-third if the Russian government agrees to a similar cut, reviving a goal outlined early in his presidency to work toward a world without nuclear weapons. Obama's proposal, which met with a cool reception in Moscow, came during a much-anticipated speech here that sought to shake Western nations from complacency that he said has taken hold since the end of the Cold War. Speaking at the Brandenburg Gate, a historic backdrop for U.S. presidents, Obama said the dissolution of the Soviet Union has brought "a sense that the great challenges have somehow passed.
NEWS
June 18, 2013
By Tobias Peter 'I ch bin ein Berliner . " Those were the famous words John F. Kennedy used to express solidarity with the people of Germany in June 1963, when he became the first U.S. president to visit the German capital after the Soviets divided it with the Berlin Wall. So what will President Obama tell the Germans when he speaks to them during his visit this week, nearly 50 years later? "People of Berlin, Germany, and Europe: I've been reading your e-mail"? If only half of what Edward Snowden has leaked about U.S. Internet surveillance is true, it will be a huge burden for transatlantic relations.
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