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Bermuda

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NEWS
August 13, 1989 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pink beaches and a gentle ocean; pastel cottages scattered along narrow, winding, hilly roads; a soft climate that fills the air with cedary smells, a quiet-spoken populace that treats neighbors and visitors with friendly good manners - Bermuda is almost perfect. It's one of the most isolated spots on Earth: The nearest land, Cape Hatteras, N.C., is 600 miles away. Because of that splendid isolation, a subtropical climate and a long, quiet history under enlightened British protection, the country has evolved into a very pleasant place.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
BERMUDA BOUND. USAir has announced it will begin daily, nonstop service to Bermuda from Philadelphia on Sept. 15. There have been no nonstop flights from here to the popular tourist island since the machinists went on strike against Eastern Airlines on March 4. Eastern was a major airline serving Bermuda, which has seen its number of visitors drop about 10 percent since the strike. MORE PARADORS. Work is wrapping up on one new parador, and Spain has announced plans to add four more, bringing the number of hotels in the government-operated group to 88. Spain's paradors, often located in restored historical landmarks, are one of the country's great tourist drawing points.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By George Ingram, Special to The Inquirer
Most people come to this floral oasis in the Atlantic Ocean for pink sand, golf and snorkeling. I had another reason: To find the best Bermudian fish chowder. It was no idle quest. Fish chowder may emerge as a pawn in a political row here. The government's environment minister recently banned the use of fish pot traps, the traditional way islanders have caught fish since the 18th century. The decision reflects a deep concern that, beneath Bermuda's placid and azure waters, fish are getting scarce.
LIVING
April 2, 1996 | By Tanya Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Is that wind sock just a wind sock? How about that slowly unfurling blossom in the new television ad for Bermuda? Is it intentional that the camera takes a tight shot of a golf ball making a hole-in-one as the background music singer croons "I'm in the mood for love"? You bet. There's nothing subliminal about this ad's seduction. It's part of a new $12.2 million campaign for Bermuda tourism, built around the slogan: "Let yourself go. " Read what you will into the commercial's images of the long nose of a cannon, of the camera slowly closing in on a round rock formation, or of the loving couple focusing on the oysters listed on their restaurant menus.
NEWS
April 9, 1994 | By Frank Greve, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Not many preachers get weekends off. Not many earn more than $100,000 a year. Richard C. Halverson does both. He's chaplain of the Senate. His job is to open Senate business with a brief daily prayer. Sometimes he counsels members or staff. It's a 9-to-3 job, says Mr. Halverson, and like his flock, he often takes Mondays and Fridays off. They worked 156 days last year. You could find a cushier hundred-thousand-dollar job in Washington, but you'd have to look hard. More commonly, bureaucrats are paid less than benched major leaguers to run billion-dollar programs.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1989 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
USAir said yesterday it would start daily, nonstop service on Sept. 15 from Philadelphia International Airport to Bermuda and Los Angeles. USAir will compete against United and Trans World Airlines on the Los Angeles route, but will have no other nonstop competitor to Bermuda, a route formerly served by Eastern Airlines. USAir spokeswoman Nancy Vaughn said the Los Angeles service, using a 210- seat Boeing 767 jet, is an example of the added flexibility the carrier will have after it merges its operations with Piedmont Airlines Aug. 5. Piedmont is a USAir Group Inc. subsidiary.
SPORTS
July 22, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
Lori King expected the pain. You don't swim for more than 21 hours in the open waters around Bermuda - all the way around, Elbow Beach to Elbow Beach - without aching shoulders, head winds exacting their toll, seemingly whatever direction she swam. A former La Salle University swimmer, Class of 1997, King felt she nailed her nutrition in the run-up to last month's swim. She was ready for the cold water. Still, 16 hours in, aiming for land points that seemed never to arrive - "Objects always appear closer than they are" - she eventually knew her right rotator cuff had slightly torn.
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dave Burt was at the helm of his 30-foot sailboat, trying to outrun the growing North Atlantic storm. It was almost 3 a.m., and Burt had been steering into waves he could barely see for hours. He was exhausted from the 10 hours of rough weather. Leaving his son-in-law, Bob Bergeron, at the helm, Burt went below to lie down in the cabin. He wasn't worried. With dawn drawing near that Tuesday two weeks ago, Burt was confident. They would steer their boat through these 8-foot swells and 20- to 25-knot winds and continue on to Bermuda, still almost 500 miles away.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | By Deborah Bolling, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Christopher Scaggs, the Glenolden police officer who has been accused of rape and suspended from the force, has been given permission by the Delaware County District Attorney's Office to travel to Bermuda for a friend's wedding. Deputy District Attorney Jay Mattera said yesterday that Scaggs, who is free on $25,000 bail, was legally permitted to make the request and had gone through the proper channels. "When you're out on bail, you can do anything you're entitled to do - except violate laws," Mattera said.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What a difference 20 years makes! When my wife, Valerie, and I first visited the idyllic island of Bermuda as a June honeymoon couple, the skies were gray and filled with rain. The ocean water was too cold to swim in. We made the most of it, puttering around the island on our motor scooter, getting drenched all the while. And, although we had a ball visiting the historic forts, picturesque towns and fancy shops, we had to wonder why Bermuda was so popular. Where was the crystal-clear water, the gentle ocean breezes - and the famous pink sand?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
August 8, 2016 | By Patricia Nickell, LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER
HAMILTON, Bermuda - This small island, only 21 square miles in size and 650 miles off the coast of Cape Hatteras, N.C., gave the world Bermuda shorts (still used as part of the island uniform), Bermuda onions (still used in island cuisine), and Bermuda grass (still used on the island's ubiquitous golf courses). Bermuda has earned literary cred, as well. An early chronicler of its infamous Triangle, William Shakespeare, used it as the shipwreck setting of The Tempest, making it the only New World location the Bard ever cited by name.
SPORTS
July 22, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
Lori King expected the pain. You don't swim for more than 21 hours in the open waters around Bermuda - all the way around, Elbow Beach to Elbow Beach - without aching shoulders, head winds exacting their toll, seemingly whatever direction she swam. A former La Salle University swimmer, Class of 1997, King felt she nailed her nutrition in the run-up to last month's swim. She was ready for the cold water. Still, 16 hours in, aiming for land points that seemed never to arrive - "Objects always appear closer than they are" - she eventually knew her right rotator cuff had slightly torn.
TRAVEL
April 13, 2015 | By Gary Frisch, For The Inquirer
The rocky cliff platform looked perilous from below, and even more perilous when I stood on it. My wife, Christina, my two teenage kids from a previous marriage, and I had arrived by cruise ship in Bermuda that morning - a happy occurrence as 48 hours earlier, we'd been expecting a trip north from New York to St. John, Newfoundland. Hurricane Arthur, however, had other plans, creeping up the East Coast early last July. Carnival Cruises made the eleventh-hour decision to take us southeast instead, ahead of the storm, to the pink sands of Bermuda.
NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Pete Altringer, the June-long slog-athon that has lapped into July has been almost a complete washout. "This by far was the worst month of the year," said Altringer, owner of Main Line Auto Wash, which has four very much rained-upon locations in the region. So, probably more than most people, Altringer was heartened to learn that the monsoon is relenting; that July Fourth might actually be dry and devoid of atmospheric fireworks; and that the weekend could be rain-free. That would be quite a change.
NEWS
June 24, 2013
By Joe Sestak My family is an Apple family. I use my iPhone to make calls and send e-mails and my iPod when I jog, and my daughter uses my iPad to play Wheel of Fortune . A few months ago, on my iPad, I saw something about Google's "double Irish with a Dutch sandwich. " This is not a food and drink combination; it's a tax avoidance scheme. And it's not just Google that uses this technique; so do Twitter and Apple. Over a three-year span, Google was able to avoid more than $3 billion in taxes by reducing its overseas tax rate to just 2.4 percent.
NEWS
October 3, 2012
A former baggage handler at Philadelphia International Airport was sentenced to 36 months' probation for smuggling marijuana on flights bound for Bermuda, authorities said. Brian Wade smuggled drugs on US Airways flights for more than 10 years, said the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Homeland Security Investigations. Wade was paid with cash that was smuggled onto flights from Bermuda to Philadelphia. On Oct. 7, 2010, his smuggling activity was noticed by another employee, and the airport was briefly shut down over fears of terrorism.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
LAST WEEKEND'S pre-election edition of the annual Bykofsky Family Fun Fest was held in Florida's I-4 "swing" corridor, rather than the usual location in deep-blue south Florida. We gathered in Orlando to decide the presidency and to celebrate my father's birthday (96 1/2) and mine (21++). Twelve adults and six juveniles were present, camped in a rented nine-bedroom hacienda (complete with in-ground pool, game room, 10-seat theater) - kind of a Mitt Romney-style vacation home. The $5,000 for four days was paid by patriarch Syd, the lifelong socialist who cannot make peace with the idea that he is comfortably middle class.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | Associated Press
HAMILTON, Bermuda - Tropical Storm Leslie's outer bands buffeted Bermuda with gusty winds and rain Sunday as it slowly edged past the wary British enclave on a path that was expected to take it to Canada's Newfoundland later in the week. The government reopened the L.F. Wade International Airport in the early evening after keeping it closed for most of the day due to tropical storm winds. Major airlines already had canceled flights to the British Atlantic territory of about 65,000 inhabitants.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Elizabeth Roberts, Associated Press
HAMILTON, Bermuda - Tourists postponed holidays in Bermuda and locals stocked up on emergency supplies as a stalled Hurricane Leslie spun over open ocean south of the wealthy British Atlantic territory Thursday. Hotel cancellations were reported across the territory, which is popular with tourists for its pink sand beaches and with businesspeople as an offshore financial haven. Bermuda's Weather Service issued a storm watch late Thursday afternoon, while the Category 1 storm was stationary about 430 miles south-southeast of the storm-hardened British enclave.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Hurricane Leslie heads north toward Bermuda, a leftover portion of Hurricane Isaac has found its way back to the Gulf of Mexico, where it's threatening to become a new tropical storm. Leslie could become a Category 2 storm before nearing Bermuda on Sunday. Its projected path should take it north toward Nova Scovia, sparing the U.S. East Coast, according to the National Hurricane Center. After making landfall in Louisiana on Aug. 27, Isaac dumped rain as it moved up the Mississippi Valley and then "was ripped in half" as it curved eastward, according to meteorologist Jeff Masters of WeatherUnderground.com.
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