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Berry Gordy

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1993 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story also contains material from the Associated Press, the New York Daily News, the Washington Post, the New York Times and USA Today
Diana Ross, out and about shilling her autobio, Secrets of a Sparrow, drops a bombshell on Monday's Oprah Winfrey TV show that isn't even in the book: That the oldest of her three daughters, Rhonda Suzanne, was fathered by Motown founder Berry Gordy, who fashioned the singer's rise to stardom. "Rhonda has two fathers," Ross tells Winfrey. "(First husband) Bob (Silberstein) is her father. He has raised her . . . yet Berry Gordy is her father. " Gordy acknowledges Rhonda, 22, as his own. In the book, Ross writes that during their marriage, Silberstein "was in a great deal of pain.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Berry Gordy, the 83-year-old founder of Motown Records, the Detroit label that became a hit-making factory and produced such stars as Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Diana Ross, Marvin Gaye, the Temptations, and Michael Jackson, is the recipient of the 2013 Marian Anderson Award, Mayor Nutter announced Monday. The award, given to "artists and individuals whose body of work has improved the world beyond the power to entertain," is named for the late African American contralto and South Philadelphia High graduate who was celebrated as a singer of both classical music and spirituals in her lifetime.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Motown the Musical packs its score with some of the greatest hitmakers in music history: the Jackson 5, Diana Ross and the Supremes, Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight and the Pips, the Temptations, and the Commodores. As a story, though, it's missing only a cross for Motown records founder Berry Gordy to hang on. Gordy based the musical on his 1994 autobiography, To Be Loved: The Music, The Magic, The Memories of Motown . There's plenty of music and magic in the production now on tour at the Academy of Music; in addition to the bands or artists listed above, all the Motown records stars from the 1960s to 1980s get their 15 seconds of stage time in this 21/2-hour show (some, such as Teena Marie and Rick James, merely bookend a short-shrift collection of Motown's late-period hits)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1994 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ask Berry Gordy why Motown Records produced so many superstars and he'll tell you this: "Many of us are really great, but outside factors affect us," said the Motown founder. "I feel that less than 1 percent of all the people in the world ever reach their full potential. "All of us have raw talent. But raw talent isn't enough. It has to be nurtured and developed. And that's what we did. " An assumption we can safely make is that Gordy, a 64-year-old multimillionaire who lives on an estate in Los Angeles' Bel-Air section, is among that 1 percent of people who reached their full potential.
NEWS
August 26, 2011
Esther Gordy Edwards, 91, who helped build Motown Records alongside her brother Berry Gordy Jr. and led efforts to turn its original Detroit headquarters into a museum, died Wednesday in Detroit. Mrs. Edwards was a Motown executive for nearly three decades, holding numerous leadership positions within the music company whose artists included Stevie Wonder, Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, the Supremes, Marvin Gaye, the Temptations, and the Four Tops. Motown Records, which Berry Gordy started with a family loan in 1959, churned out scores of global hits from the building it dubbed "Hitsville, U.S.A.
NEWS
July 9, 2009
MANY of Michael Jackson's most ardent fans believe he was most influenced by James Brown, Smokey Robinson, Fred Astaire and Diana Ross. But the skills and direction he assimilated from them were merely the icing on an explosive cake. That recipe was given to Michael by the unbelievable Frankie Lymon. The Lymon sound, energy and exuberant buoyancy were all incorporated by Michael, just as Lymon's group the Teenagers influenced the Jackson 5. What's more, two huge fans of Frankie Lymon were Berry Gordy and Quincy Jones.
NEWS
October 26, 1993 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
SECRETS OF A SPARROW Diana Ross (Villard / $22) It's a shame that Diana Ross' memoirs, "Secrets of a Sparrow," aren't available on CD. If it were, you could fast-forward, getting 30- or 40-second snippets from each chapter and be done with it - rather than wading through all 280 pages. Which is not to say this is a bad book. It is to say that you have to looooooove Diana Ross in order to finish it without a couple tablets of No-Doz and an extremely high tolerance for overwriting.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1986 | By SUE CUMMINGS, Los Angeles Daily News
Mary Wilson admits that at age 42, she is a little young to publish her memoirs. But there's quite a story packed into those years. "Dreamgirl: My Life as a Supreme" (St. Martin's Press, $16.95) tells about her experiences as one-third of Motown's most glamorous and successful singing group of the '60s. But Wilson, now pursuing a solo career, has hardly retired from show business. So why the rush to release her autobiography this month? The prologue of "Dreamgirl" holds a clue.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Motown the Musical packs its score with some of the greatest hitmakers in music history: the Jackson 5, Diana Ross and the Supremes, Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight and the Pips, the Temptations, and the Commodores. As a story, though, it's missing only a cross for Motown records founder Berry Gordy to hang on. Gordy based the musical on his 1994 autobiography, To Be Loved: The Music, The Magic, The Memories of Motown . There's plenty of music and magic in the production now on tour at the Academy of Music; in addition to the bands or artists listed above, all the Motown records stars from the 1960s to 1980s get their 15 seconds of stage time in this 21/2-hour show (some, such as Teena Marie and Rick James, merely bookend a short-shrift collection of Motown's late-period hits)
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When Berry Gordy talks about the legendary record company he started in Detroit back in 1959 (originally Tamla Records, it became the Motown Record Corp. in 1960), he describes an entity transcending music. "My Motown is like a tree," he says with relish. "We go out on branches in every different direction. " The sounds and sights of Smokey Robinson's Miracles, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, the young Michael Jackson, the Temptations, the Four Tops, and Diana Ross (Gordy's onetime, longtime paramour)
NEWS
January 2, 2015
SO, THERE you are, putting together what would ultimately become the Tony-glomming smash "Motown the Musical," the national tour of which on Tuesday opens a 13-day run at the Academy of Music. How in the world do you decide which songs from the label's impossibly rich and important catalogue to use, and which don't make the cut? "I always say, 'Motown the Musical' should be a 10-hour miniseries, but we have to do it in 2 1/2 hours," offered producer Kevin McCollum , the musical-theater powerhouse ("Avenue Q," "Rent," "In the Heights")
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
NATURE OR NURTURE? It' a fair question to put to Rhonda Ross - only love child of supremely gifted song stylist Diana Ross and Motown Records founder Berry Gordy - as Rhonda preps for her area club debut tomorrow. The venue? The aptly named, genre-crossing Rrazz Room cabaret in New Hope. Yes, Rhonda Ross has a look that identifies her as a mix of her parents. (Raised as a Silberstein, Rhonda didn't know Gordy was her biological dad until age 13.) Some resemblances also are noted in her singing voice, especially the way Rhonda modulates final notes - with a pitchy waver that's part of the Diana Ross signature.
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
'My dream was to make some music and get some girls," says Berry Gordy Jr. "My bar was low. As I went on, new doors kept opening. I exceeded my wildest dreams. " He pauses for a moment. It's been a very good year for the founder of Motown Records, who will be 84 on Nov. 28. Since his jukebox autobiography's debut on Broadway in April, Motown The Musical has made $45 million. In June, the Songwriters Hall of Fame honored him with its pioneer award. Earlier this month, he received Ebony magazine's Lifetime Achievement Award.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
PHILLY'S OWN Jill Scott likes not being Jill Scott, if only for a little while. She hits the big screen tomorrow in "Baggage Claim," playing Gail, the cheeky best friend to Paula Patton 's lovelorn flight attendant who doesn't realize that love might not require a boarding pass. Saucy Gail is quite different from songstress Scott or even the Jill Scott who has inhabited other roles, like Precious in "The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency" or Sheila in "Why Did I Get Married?"
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Berry Gordy, the 83-year-old founder of Motown Records, the Detroit label that became a hit-making factory and produced such stars as Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Diana Ross, Marvin Gaye, the Temptations, and Michael Jackson, is the recipient of the 2013 Marian Anderson Award, Mayor Nutter announced Monday. The award, given to "artists and individuals whose body of work has improved the world beyond the power to entertain," is named for the late African American contralto and South Philadelphia High graduate who was celebrated as a singer of both classical music and spirituals in her lifetime.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
THERE WERE plenty of one-hit girl wonders in the 1960s. Start with juvenile cuties like "Locomotion" chirper Little Eva and come-ons like the Ronettes ("Be My Baby") and the Shangri-Las ("Leader of the Pack") - bad girls you'd never take home to meet mom. Then there were the Supremes, a glamour-girl group built for the long haul - and crossover appeal to audiences of every age, stripe and skin tone - with their low-keyed, lilting vocal tones and lush, string- and horn-endowed Holland-Dozier-Holland pop-soul gems.
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