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Betsy Ross House

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Flagfest continues at the Betsy Ross House with a Flag Day celebration Friday, and tomorrow is Stars and Stripes Saturday. Friday will feature craft activities for kids from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The official City of Philadelphia Flag Day ceremony will be held at noon, and from noon to 2 George Washington will have a meet and greet. Guests can also experience Continental Army interactive drills and other activities. The fun continues Saturday. Families can enjoy Professor Horn's Punch and Judy puppet show, Bag Lady Theatre, an aerial circus, carnival games, and the Give & Take Jugglers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
While the Founding Fathers toiled in Independence Hall and young patriots fought the British, most Colonial women took charge on the domestic front - and running a household in the 18th century was no easy thing. Clothes and bedding needed to be hand-sewn. With no refrigeration, foods had to be butchered, pickled, preserved. Laundry took three days and required hauling water, scrubbing with lye, and hours of ironing. These domestic jobs, often overlooked, are now being highlighted at the Betsy Ross House through a new, permanent exhibit, "Women at Work in Revolutionary America.
NEWS
July 5, 2010 | By Kia Gregory, Inquirer Staff Writer
Melissa Menkeng had picked out her special dress - white and frilly, with black trim - for the ceremony, which was held Sunday in the muggy shade of the Betsy Ross House courtyard. Sitting in the front row, the sixth grader nervously twirled a small American flag while she waited, one of 13 children from different countries who would become U.S. citizens. The half-hour ceremony was part of "Let Freedom Ring" events to celebrate the signing of the Declaration of Independence, and was sponsored by the American Flag House and Betsy Ross Memorial and by the Flag House Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff, Daily News Staff Writer
Carey-ing on . . . A king of improv comedy, funnyman  Drew Carey  surprised several people yesterday when he showed up unannounced at some public places around town. Carey made his first appearance Tuesday night at Cuba Libre (10 S. 2nd St.) in Old City with a lady friend, where he ate the adobo-rubbed 12 oz. Black Angus sirloin steak and a side of grilled broccoli. He opted for bottled water. I'm told Carey drinks only water - no carbs - as part of his diet. My sources say he finished everything on his plate and left the server a 200 percent tip. Then, yesterday, among other stops, it was off to the Betsy Ross House (239 Arch St.)
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Betsy Ross has been making the rounds this spring, charming travel agents at the Greenbrier resort in West Virginia, chatting up the morning guys at WIP-AM, training for the Market Street Mile. It's no wonder that Betsy - actually city tourism official Karen Butler and 30 pounds of floral Colonial garb - has been on the road so much. Philadelphia's legendary flag maker is homeless. The Betsy Ross House was supposed to be closed during January for renovations. That's what the city said in a news release.
NEWS
September 27, 1997 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles H. Weisgerber Jr. wants to give something away. But first he needs $25,000. Weisgerber wants to donate his grandfather's famous oil painting, Birth of Our Nation's Flag, to the Betsy Ross House. The 9-by-12-foot canvas depicts Betsy Ross showing a newly sewn 13-star American flag to George Washington. But the century-old canvas is rolled up and has been in temperature-controlled storage in South Jersey for more than 30 years. It needs major repairs. On Monday, Weisgerber plans to meet with Arthur Hoist, executive director of the Betsy Ross House, to discuss his hopes for the painting.
NEWS
May 2, 2001 | by Dave Davies Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia police and the city inspector general's office are investigating the disappearance of four historically valuable artifacts from the Betsy Ross House, the Daily News has learned. Investigators from the inspector general's office will also examine financial controls and care of the collection and archives at the national landmark after questions arose about the handling of cash and when some historical artifacts were discovered in damaged or deteriorated condition. Among the items reported missing to police are a 19th century crystal vase and a gold sewing thimble donated to the house by Betsy Ross's descendants.
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL S. WIRTZ
Philadelphia schoolchildren show off Old Glory. The flags were distributed yesterday during ceremonies commemorating Flag Day at the Betsy Ross House, 239 Arch St. in Old City.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2016 | By Grace Dickinson, FOR DoTHIS
Labor Day marks the unofficial end to summer. The holiday also brings a golden three-day weekend to knock out a few Philadelphia summer bucket-list items before it's too late. Whether you want to catch a movie under the stars, get one last skate in, savor a locally made double scoop of peach ice cream, or seek to do all of the above, take advantage of the extended weekend before you bid farewell to the hottest season of the year. Roller skate at Summerfest 1 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday; 11 a.m.-1 a.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Sunday; 1 p.m.-11 p.m. Monday; Blue Cross RiverRink Summerfest , 101 S. Columbus Blvd., $3 (admission)
NEWS
August 19, 2016
ISSUE | PHILADELPHIA DEVELOPMENT A ringing endorsement for Jewelers Row I was shocked to read that Toll Bros. is planning to demolish five buildings on Jewelers Row to build yet another high-rise residential building ("Reshaping Jewelers Row," Friday). How can that not destroy the character of this historic street, where many people have shopped for engagement and wedding rings? Said to be the nation's oldest diamond district, the row has existed for more than 11/2 centuries, though it is not historically protected.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2016 | STAFF
Need something to do this weekend? Don't worry, we've got you covered. KIDS 8 p.m. Friday, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday and continuing on a varied schedule through June 26, Arden Theatre , 40 N. Second St. $15 to $46. 215-922-1122. Based on Frances Hodgson Burnett's 1911 novel, Marsha Norman and Lucy Simon's 1989 musical tells the story of an orphan girl who is sent to live with her strange uncle in a haunted manor house in the Yorkshire moors. Given that it has the usual Victorian children's-story horrors (though with the usual happy ending shining through the gloom)
NEWS
June 6, 2016
Historic Philadelphia Inc. held its eighth annual Evening in Franklin Square on May 19, which included programs at the Betsy Ross House, Once Upon a Nation storytelling, and several walking tours. More than 450 guests enjoyed cocktails amid the lights of the Chinese Lantern Festival, as well as silent and live auctions, sit-down dinner, and dancing to the band Jellyroll. The $160,000 raised will be used to help maintain safe green space, signature attractions, and free programs.
NEWS
May 7, 2016
Given its outsize notoriety, it's worth noting that the cloth-draped chain-link fence corralling Franklin Square for the Philadelphia Chinese Lantern Festival is not exactly the Great Wall. But it has caused great controversy for some good reasons. For all the suddenness with which the fence separated one of William Penn's five original squares from his "greene country towne," it's the result of a gradual accumulation of private prerogatives in public parks. Historic Philadelphia Inc., the nonprofit to which the then-shabby square was turned over a decade ago, has transformed it into a delightful urban oasis partly by virtue of money-making concessions such as a burger stand, an old-fashioned carousel, and a miniature golf course bearing adorable dollhouse versions of Philadelphia monuments.
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Get a kick out of this: 57 painted fiberglass donkeys are coming to town. The Democratic National Convention's host committee announced Tuesday that the painted donkeys - representing the 50 states, five U.S. territories, the District of Columbia, and Democrats abroad - will be scattered across Center City to drum up excitement for the convention and draw tourists to different parts of town. "It did come out of my fertile and overactive mind, but it had some rational basis," said former Gov. Ed Rendell, chair of the host committee, at a news conference announcing the donkeys.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
While the Founding Fathers toiled in Independence Hall and young patriots fought the British, most Colonial women took charge on the domestic front - and running a household in the 18th century was no easy thing. Clothes and bedding needed to be hand-sewn. With no refrigeration, foods had to be butchered, pickled, preserved. Laundry took three days and required hauling water, scrubbing with lye, and hours of ironing. These domestic jobs, often overlooked, are now being highlighted at the Betsy Ross House through a new, permanent exhibit, "Women at Work in Revolutionary America.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2015 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Seven-year-old Joanna Harris loves to tell stories, ones already written and ones she writes herself. When many of her classmates decided to rehash Disney movies during a school program, she wrote "Ocean Tale," a harrowing adventure featuring two mermaids almost captured by an evil fisherman. (Spoiler alert: Surfer Girl saves the day.) Then the Paoli girl and her family spent July 4 visiting all 10 Once Upon a Nation storytelling benches around Independence Hall, where they learned the program was sponsoring a contest to celebrate its 10th anniversary.
NEWS
July 6, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Bill Robling leaned on his eagle-headed walking stick in front of his office in the Historic Philadelphia Center. He wore summer business attire: linen frock coat and cream-colored cravat. Tricorn hat. Bifocals, of course. Robling is Ben Franklin. His office a canvas theatrical set. A quill pen. A writing table. A kite near the windowsill. "Goodness, welcome," he greeted the Cyruliks, a family of six from Mount Pulaski, Ill. "Oh, here, why don't you stand with Benjamin?"
NEWS
July 4, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As the clock tower at Independence Hall struck 3 on a Thursday afternoon, Continental Army trooper Robert Hare stood next door in Signer's Garden, enlisting volunteers for the impending Revolution. The new soldiers, some missing front teeth, others waving flags taller than they were, headed down Fifth Street to the beat of Hare's drum. Historic Philadelphia's twice-a-day reenactment of a military muster is just a small part of its successful Once Upon a Nation program, which celebrates its 10th anniversary this summer.
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