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Beverly Hills Cop

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
It was July of last year, and New York was plagued by a drought that led the city to take drastic conservation measures. The question before the company making Off Beat on the streets of Manhattan was how to stage a thunderstorm without touching off a riot among parched and already ill- tempered New Yorkers. "We had to have rainy scenes because Michael (director Michael Dinner) is a very moody person, and he loves rain," recalled Judge Reinhold, the young star of the comedy that opened Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Michael Dinner made his directing debut last year with a film called Catholic Boys. The reason nobody heard of it can be traced to the studio's decision to change the title to Heaven Help Us. Under its new name, Dinner's movie - actually a droll look at guilt-edged Catholic adolescence - was passed off as just another teen-jerk comedy and promptly died at the box office. After this less-than-heavenly experience with the marketing geniuses of Hollywood, Dinner returns with Off Beat.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | By BARBARA BECK, Daily News Staff Writer
Will the name Eddie Murphy revive CBS? The struggling network thinks so. CBS, languishing in third place in the ratings and facing continuing financial problems, is celebrating because Eddie Murphy Television Entertainment Inc. has agreed to produce a half-hour series, pilots and three annual specials for the network. But the three-year exclusive deal does not mean that viewers will see Murphy next year on television. In most cases, says his publicist Terrie Williams, Murphy's on-camera participation will depend on the scripts, program formats and his other commitments.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
You have to wonder why Eddie Murphy, fresh off the $100 million success of "The Nutty Professor," chose a derivative cop story for his follow-up release. "Metro" is a cliched cop flick that isn't sure if it wants to be a psychological thriller, a cop buddy film or a retread of every other Eddie Murphy cop movie. What passes for a plot is this: Murphy is Scott Roper, a hostage negotiator for the San Francisco Police Department. When Lt. Sam Baffert (Art Evans) is murdered, Murphy wants to find his killer, jewel thief Michael Korda (Michael Wincott)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's tough to screw up an omelet. But it can certainly be done. The good cop/crazy cop routine is a fluffy, almost fail-proof Hollywood action-comedy formula. But Cop Out , starring Tracy Morgan and Bruce Willis, still does it injustice. It's a hyper procession of comic cliches, unimaginatively tacked together by director Kevin Smith. (Yeah, the guy who recently got booted by Southwest Airlines for billowing beyond his allotted seat space. Now that has the makings of a decent comedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2014 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Legends with Sean Bean ( Sharpe's Rifles ) is a show, that, like Josh Holloway's CBS series Intelligence last season, should work but doesn't due to a lack of imagination and daring. Bean's Martin Odum is an FBI agent who is, in the immortal words of Eddie Murphy in Beverly Hills Cop 2 , "deep, deep, deep, deep undercover. " He gets so lost in the alter egos he adopts to infiltrate criminal enterprises that he will slip into their speech patterns without realizing it. So lost that he signs a child support check to his wife with the name of the militia nut job he is pretending to be. His identity is so splintered that as his handler (Cherry Hill native Ali Larter)
NEWS
June 13, 1988 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
"You are just filled with creativity," gushes the interrogator, her voice dribbling like hot fudge onto ice cream, "and it makes me wonder: How does it keep coming?" Eddie Murphy, sitting on a stage in front of a roomful of inquiring minds, sends his eyebrows skyward. "You like me," he says with a self-assurance that would make Sally Field blush, "don't you?" Murphy can charm the world with a grin and a giggle. He's Hollywood's Billion-Dollar Man - that's the accumulated grosses of his films - and that kind of dough adds up to serious show-business power.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1992 | By Ryan Murphy, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Eddie Murphy's studio-approved biography, a meticulously researched, three- page document titled "The First Decade," is a veritable font of Eddie trivia, worship and lore. It chronicles his glittering career in film, covering such blockbusters as Beverly Hills Cop, Trading Places and 48 HRS., and quotes directors including John Landis, who compares him to Peter Sellers and Alec Guinness in the same breath. But the most telling anecdote about Murphy - the Toilet Moment - is nowhere to be found in the "First Decade" recap.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
One of the surest ways for a director to show that a policeman's lot is not a happy one - and it never is in contemporary films - is to assign his hero a stakeout. Whether it's a freezing Gene Hackman eating a decrepit hot dog while his quarry enjoys a gourmet meal in The French Connection or Judge Reinhold sitting forlornly outside Eddie Murphy's luxury hotel in Beverly Hills Cop, the stakeout is the time when the hours of boredom weigh heavily. Traditionally, it's the down time in a detective movie before the action explodes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1986 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"No Mercy," a drama starring Richard Gere and Kim Basinger. Directed by Richard Pearce. Screenplay by Jim Carabatsos. Running time: 107 minutes. A Tri-Star release. At area theaters. I kept waiting for it to happen. "No Mercy," the new thriller with Richard Gere and Kim Basinger, is such a comprehensive compendium of cop-movie cliches that the absence of my personal favorite was a major disappointment . The film's first 15 minutes tip off its ritualistic nature. Chicago Detective Eddie Gillette (Gere)
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2014 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Legends with Sean Bean ( Sharpe's Rifles ) is a show, that, like Josh Holloway's CBS series Intelligence last season, should work but doesn't due to a lack of imagination and daring. Bean's Martin Odum is an FBI agent who is, in the immortal words of Eddie Murphy in Beverly Hills Cop 2 , "deep, deep, deep, deep undercover. " He gets so lost in the alter egos he adopts to infiltrate criminal enterprises that he will slip into their speech patterns without realizing it. So lost that he signs a child support check to his wife with the name of the militia nut job he is pretending to be. His identity is so splintered that as his handler (Cherry Hill native Ali Larter)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's tough to screw up an omelet. But it can certainly be done. The good cop/crazy cop routine is a fluffy, almost fail-proof Hollywood action-comedy formula. But Cop Out , starring Tracy Morgan and Bruce Willis, still does it injustice. It's a hyper procession of comic cliches, unimaginatively tacked together by director Kevin Smith. (Yeah, the guy who recently got booted by Southwest Airlines for billowing beyond his allotted seat space. Now that has the makings of a decent comedy.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
You have to wonder why Eddie Murphy, fresh off the $100 million success of "The Nutty Professor," chose a derivative cop story for his follow-up release. "Metro" is a cliched cop flick that isn't sure if it wants to be a psychological thriller, a cop buddy film or a retread of every other Eddie Murphy cop movie. What passes for a plot is this: Murphy is Scott Roper, a hostage negotiator for the San Francisco Police Department. When Lt. Sam Baffert (Art Evans) is murdered, Murphy wants to find his killer, jewel thief Michael Korda (Michael Wincott)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1994 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The last time moviegoers saw Eddie Murphy as Axel Foley, Ronald Reagan was president, Nelson Mandela was in a South African jail and the Olsen twins had yet to appear on Full House. Full House, in fact, had yet to appear - Bob Saget was still a Philadelphia comic trying to make a splash on network TV. But even back in May of '87, as Beverly Hills Cop II invaded multiplexes on its way to $276.7 million in world grosses, the powers-that-were were talking about a third installment.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1992 | By Ryan Murphy, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Eddie Murphy's studio-approved biography, a meticulously researched, three- page document titled "The First Decade," is a veritable font of Eddie trivia, worship and lore. It chronicles his glittering career in film, covering such blockbusters as Beverly Hills Cop, Trading Places and 48 HRS., and quotes directors including John Landis, who compares him to Peter Sellers and Alec Guinness in the same breath. But the most telling anecdote about Murphy - the Toilet Moment - is nowhere to be found in the "First Decade" recap.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | By BARBARA BECK, Daily News Staff Writer
Will the name Eddie Murphy revive CBS? The struggling network thinks so. CBS, languishing in third place in the ratings and facing continuing financial problems, is celebrating because Eddie Murphy Television Entertainment Inc. has agreed to produce a half-hour series, pilots and three annual specials for the network. But the three-year exclusive deal does not mean that viewers will see Murphy next year on television. In most cases, says his publicist Terrie Williams, Murphy's on-camera participation will depend on the scripts, program formats and his other commitments.
NEWS
June 13, 1988 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
"You are just filled with creativity," gushes the interrogator, her voice dribbling like hot fudge onto ice cream, "and it makes me wonder: How does it keep coming?" Eddie Murphy, sitting on a stage in front of a roomful of inquiring minds, sends his eyebrows skyward. "You like me," he says with a self-assurance that would make Sally Field blush, "don't you?" Murphy can charm the world with a grin and a giggle. He's Hollywood's Billion-Dollar Man - that's the accumulated grosses of his films - and that kind of dough adds up to serious show-business power.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1988 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are many reasons to thank the gods on this, the week that Beverly Hills Cop II gets slapped onto shelves in video stores across the land. One reason: We're not watching Sylvester Stallone. Yes, it's true. When the nabobs at Paramount Pictures first dreamed up the Beverly Hills Cop (high) concept many moons ago, it was designed as a vehicle not for Eddie Murphy but for the pec-flexing Sly One himself. Instead of Murphy swaggering his way down Rodeo Drive, blithely tossing one of those goofball laughs - the laugh that sounds like an emphysematous seal - we could have had the Italian Stallion, with his Mumford High T-shirt ripped open and a headband around those sweat-black locks, crashing into the Beverly Hills Hotel sporting a handful of Uzis.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
One of the surest ways for a director to show that a policeman's lot is not a happy one - and it never is in contemporary films - is to assign his hero a stakeout. Whether it's a freezing Gene Hackman eating a decrepit hot dog while his quarry enjoys a gourmet meal in The French Connection or Judge Reinhold sitting forlornly outside Eddie Murphy's luxury hotel in Beverly Hills Cop, the stakeout is the time when the hours of boredom weigh heavily. Traditionally, it's the down time in a detective movie before the action explodes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1986 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"No Mercy," a drama starring Richard Gere and Kim Basinger. Directed by Richard Pearce. Screenplay by Jim Carabatsos. Running time: 107 minutes. A Tri-Star release. At area theaters. I kept waiting for it to happen. "No Mercy," the new thriller with Richard Gere and Kim Basinger, is such a comprehensive compendium of cop-movie cliches that the absence of my personal favorite was a major disappointment . The film's first 15 minutes tip off its ritualistic nature. Chicago Detective Eddie Gillette (Gere)
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