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Bhutan

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LIVING
February 9, 2000 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There are double threats and triple threats in the movie biz, a veritable horde of hyphenates. There are the multihatted (or baseball-capped) actor-directors; the busy and ubiquitous writer-producers; theaction-heroes/story-creators/can't-get-out-of-the-editor's-way-superstars. But chances are there is only one of these: writer-director-recognized-reincarnation-of-a-19th-century-Buddhist-saint.That would be Khyentse Norbu, a lama from Bhutan, the Himalayan kingdom cradled between India and China.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2005 | By JAMI BERNARD New York Daily News
Shangri-La is in your own back yard. That's the message of "Travellers and Magicians," a lovely, leisurely film shot in the low-tech kingdom of Bhutan. The movie unfolds two stories whose shaggy-dog meanderings belie their laser-sharp purpose. It's all in the service of persuading Dondup (Tshewang Dendup) that he has it good in the local village and should give up his dreams of picking grapes in the U.S. His escape to the land of his dreams backfires in gently comic - and cosmic - ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2000 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Some believers are fanatics and all fanatics are devout, but how many devout Buddhist monks are also soccer fanatics? More than you think, according to The Cup, an improbably funny and transcendent account of soccer-mad Tibetan monks in exile at a Bhutan monastery. Sneaking out of the religious retreat after hours to watch satellite broadcasts of the World Cup, they pray to Buddha - and also that France will beat Brazil. The Cup is the first feature-length film from Bhutan, the tiny kingdom tucked in a Himalayan nook between India and China.
TRAVEL
August 15, 2016
Answer: Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, Myanmar, Nepal, and Pakistan. Sri Lanka is also a neighboring country, though separated by the sea.  
NEWS
January 22, 2005 | By ERIC WEINER
IF YOU'RE INDIGNANT that your boss just shut the smoking room and outraged that you have to leave the bar to light up, take heart. Life could be worse. You could be Bhutanese. The tiny Himalayan kingdom recently became the world's first nonsmoking nation. Since Dec. 17, it has been illegal to smoke in public or sell tobacco. Violators are fined the equivalent of $232 - more than two months' salary in Bhutan. The country's smokers seem resigned to a smoke-free future. "If you can't get it, you can't smoke it," concludes Tshewang Dendup, who works for Bhutan's only broadcaster.
NEWS
September 5, 1992
One-time chess prodigy-brat Bobby Fischer - now paunchy, middle-aged chess boor Bobby Fischer - has spent 20 years living in cheap California hotels, waiting for a nuclear holocaust and the Second Coming. Now he has surfaced, 70 miles from the genocide in Bosnia, to play chess. It's clear that he spent some of his time in hiding figuring out even more ways to gross out the civilized world. In a press conference before the match with oldtime foe Boris Spassky, Fischer called the current chess champions "cheats," and spit on a fax from the U.S. government warning him that playing in Yugoslavia violated sanctions against the murderous regime.
NEWS
August 30, 2011
By Jeffrey D. Sachs We live in a time of high anxiety. Despite the world's unprecedented total wealth, there is vast insecurity, unrest, and dissatisfaction. In the United States, a large majority of Americans believe the country is "on the wrong track. " The same is true in many other places. Against this backdrop, the time has come to reconsider the basic sources of happiness. The relentless pursuit of higher income is leading to unprecedented inequality and anxiety rather than greater happiness and satisfaction.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2000 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER
Dar Williams isn't any fun, even when she tries to be funny. Friday night at the Keswick Theatre, the onetime theater major played the part of a sensitive folksinger, but her I-me-mine giggly patter dwelled on her latest hair color, her Wesleyan days, and her recent trip to exclusive Bhutan. She introduced "Spring Street" with predictable starving-artist pap, while to the left of ax-man Steuart Smith stood eight carefully tended guitars. And she imposed a strict class structure on stage: Her four bandmates received full introductions; the roadies, as befits the help, got first names only.
TRAVEL
June 9, 2013
There's an adventuress in every woman just waiting to come out. Name: GlobalAdventuress.com What it does: Inspires women to travel with firsthand cultural experiences from other women. What's hot: The website speaks to many destinations and cultures, such as a five-day trip in Bhutan visiting the Dzong fortresses, or drinking fruity rakia in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The approach is simple and therefore approachable for a wide variety of women looking for travel inspiration and empowerment.
NEWS
April 18, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Prosecutors packed the courtroom with Dr. Kermit Gosnell's battered equipment, placed directly before the jury, the detritus of his ghastly practice. A gray tufted vinyl recovery chair, similar to the one where Karnamaya Mongar moaned in pain before her death, has a side streaked with blood. An ancient yellow ultrasound machine and nonfunctioning defibrillator surround a torn ob-gyn exam table. Tucked in a corner is a tool kit containing jars of fetus feet. Sam Gulino, the city's medical examiner, testified Monday that his examination of 47 frozen fetuses was "something that in 15 to 16 years . . . I had never been asked to do. " Gosnell is charged with eight homicides - Mongar and seven newborns.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
August 15, 2016
Answer: Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, Myanmar, Nepal, and Pakistan. Sri Lanka is also a neighboring country, though separated by the sea.  
TRAVEL
June 9, 2013
There's an adventuress in every woman just waiting to come out. Name: GlobalAdventuress.com What it does: Inspires women to travel with firsthand cultural experiences from other women. What's hot: The website speaks to many destinations and cultures, such as a five-day trip in Bhutan visiting the Dzong fortresses, or drinking fruity rakia in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The approach is simple and therefore approachable for a wide variety of women looking for travel inspiration and empowerment.
NEWS
April 18, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Prosecutors packed the courtroom with Dr. Kermit Gosnell's battered equipment, placed directly before the jury, the detritus of his ghastly practice. A gray tufted vinyl recovery chair, similar to the one where Karnamaya Mongar moaned in pain before her death, has a side streaked with blood. An ancient yellow ultrasound machine and nonfunctioning defibrillator surround a torn ob-gyn exam table. Tucked in a corner is a tool kit containing jars of fetus feet. Sam Gulino, the city's medical examiner, testified Monday that his examination of 47 frozen fetuses was "something that in 15 to 16 years . . . I had never been asked to do. " Gosnell is charged with eight homicides - Mongar and seven newborns.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a recent morning, a small group of refugees from Bhutan proudly pointed to a laptop screen displaying photos they had taken of Philadelphia, their new home. Karna Karki had taken pictures of a Hindu priest, seated on the floor with an array of bowls and a flame that symbolized life before him, part of a naming ceremony for a new baby. He also snapped a solemn group in the midst of 13 days of mourning. The dominant Buddhist culture in Bhutan had tried to extinguish such rituals, Karki, 41, said with the help of a fuzzy interpreter on a cellphone speaker.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is just past 8 a.m., and the refugees are lining up on a narrow street in South Philadelphia. Within the hour, almost 100 arrive. Men in woolen earflap beanies, lumberjack shirts, and hoodies. Women in shawls, sari pants, and sandals. Toddlers on tiptoes clutching their mothers' hands. All the faces, Asian. Suddenly, a pickup laden with 800 pounds of fresh fruit rounds the corner, quieting the bustle. For a moment, the only sound is the rustle of white plastic bags waiting to be filled.
NEWS
August 30, 2011
By Jeffrey D. Sachs We live in a time of high anxiety. Despite the world's unprecedented total wealth, there is vast insecurity, unrest, and dissatisfaction. In the United States, a large majority of Americans believe the country is "on the wrong track. " The same is true in many other places. Against this backdrop, the time has come to reconsider the basic sources of happiness. The relentless pursuit of higher income is leading to unprecedented inequality and anxiety rather than greater happiness and satisfaction.
NEWS
January 4, 2010 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The alarm clock's 3 a.m. ring awakened 50-year-old Rudra Kuikel and his eldest daughter, Thagi, 22, in their lightly furnished South Philadelphia apartment. An hour later they were in a van along with other immigrants headed for the Swedesboro packaged-food plant where father and daughter, working side by side, chopped lettuce for eight hours, netting $50 each after taxes and paying $5 each for transportation. The Kuikel family, ethnic Nepali Hindus who once lived in Bhutan, includes wife Jasodha, son Indra, 19, and daughter Tulasha, 13. They fled Bhutan in 1992 after new citizenship laws there made it impossible for them to remain in the small nation, population 691,000, which straddles India's border with China and where Rudra Kuikel was a subsistence farmer growing rice and corn.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2005 | By JAMI BERNARD New York Daily News
Shangri-La is in your own back yard. That's the message of "Travellers and Magicians," a lovely, leisurely film shot in the low-tech kingdom of Bhutan. The movie unfolds two stories whose shaggy-dog meanderings belie their laser-sharp purpose. It's all in the service of persuading Dondup (Tshewang Dendup) that he has it good in the local village and should give up his dreams of picking grapes in the U.S. His escape to the land of his dreams backfires in gently comic - and cosmic - ways.
NEWS
January 22, 2005 | By ERIC WEINER
IF YOU'RE INDIGNANT that your boss just shut the smoking room and outraged that you have to leave the bar to light up, take heart. Life could be worse. You could be Bhutanese. The tiny Himalayan kingdom recently became the world's first nonsmoking nation. Since Dec. 17, it has been illegal to smoke in public or sell tobacco. Violators are fined the equivalent of $232 - more than two months' salary in Bhutan. The country's smokers seem resigned to a smoke-free future. "If you can't get it, you can't smoke it," concludes Tshewang Dendup, who works for Bhutan's only broadcaster.
SPORTS
July 1, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Goalie Curtis Joseph opted to become an unrestricted free agent after failing to reach a deal with the Toronto Maple Leafs yesterday. Toronto then traded Joseph's rights to Calgary for a conditional eighth-round draft pick in 2004. Joseph isn't expected to sign with the Flames, meaning Calgary will receive compensatory draft picks when he signs with another team. Late last night, the New York Rangers traded the rights to goalie Mike Richter to Edmonton for future considerations, and the Maple Leafs traded the rights to enforcer Tie Domi to Nashville for a 2003 eighth-round draft pick.
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