CollectionsBicycle Lanes
IN THE NEWS

Bicycle Lanes

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 21, 1996 | By Drew Weaver, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A new wrinkle has appeared in the state's plan for widening Route 202 through Montgomery County - officials want to make it even wider so that bicycles can use the highway as well as cars. Besides adding a full lane for motorists, Montgomery County planners intend to add four extra feet of pavement in some areas, setting aside an extra mini-lane in each direction for bicycle traffic. The addition - recently announced to municipal governments that lie along the northern spur of this bustling route - would become the center of an anticipated bicycle artery running north and south into Bucks and Chester Counties.
NEWS
July 15, 1998 | By Angela Pomponio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was bad enough, Jacqueline Weiss says, when she heard Route 202 might encroach upon her DeKalb Boulevard property to make way for more traffic. But the hardest blow came, she says, when she realized that the proposed widening of the highway included 5-foot-wide bike lanes on each side. Making way for progress near homes is one thing, Weiss and many of her neighbors say. But for recreation, too? Please. "Bike riders are going to be on 202?" Weiss quizzed a state Department of Transportation project consultant during a meeting Monday of the Board of Supervisors.
NEWS
November 9, 2006
RE "Why drivers go wild" (letters, Nov. 2): In his indictment of Philadelphia motorists, Len Trower suggests that we might be driving too slowly. This is about as smart as the letter-writer who argued that tavern patrons should be armed. And as for his assertion that the city's bicycle lanes are "useless," I invite Mr. Trower to join me and the thousands of other bike commuters who use these lanes daily. He'll get a different perspective on Philadelphia traffic - as well as exercise.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | Daily News staff report
A two-week trial to reduce automobile traffic lanes from four to three on Market Street and JFK Boulevard, between 15th and 20th streets, to allow for bicycle lanes, did not hamper either parking nor loading and deliveries, the Mayor's Office of Transportation and Utilities said yesterday. "The trial has demonstrated that it's worth continuing to explore options for transforming Market Street and JFK west of City Hall into truly complete streets: streets that well serve pedestrians, buses, cars, delivery vehicles and bikes," said Rina Cutler, the deputy mayor for Transportation and Utilities.
NEWS
May 29, 1994 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You wanna talk about hostility in this town, talk to the people who bicycle through its streets. "It's a little ruder than Baltimore," says Fred Kittelmann, a leader of the Bicycle Action Movement. "There's a little more arrogance on the part of motorists. " "People look at us like we're not supposed to be on the street," says Jeff DellaPenna, 25, a bicycle courier. "The attitudes are very hostile. " Kittelmann, for one, never backs down. This is a tough posture in a city that can lay claim to being the only major city in America without a single bicycle lane.
NEWS
November 26, 2012
City Council and Mayor Nutter are about to set smarter rules of the road for bicyclists, pedestrians, and motorists - making this a fine time to push ahead with plans to make Philadelphia the next great city with a bicycle-sharing program. A bill before Council could improve safety for cyclists and pedestrians alike by imposing fines of up to $75 for riding on sidewalks or running a red light. Drivers could be fined for parking in a bike lane or opening car doors into oncoming bicycle traffic.
NEWS
October 4, 2008
When the Benjamin Franklin Parkway was modeled on the Champs-?lys?es a century ago, Philadelphians stumbled over one critically important detail: They failed to include the sidewalk cafes. Until this week. On Monday, the first year-round cafe on the Parkway opened on a triangular slice of Fairmount Park land at 16th Street near JFK Plaza's LOVE Park. At a festive ceremony amid cascades of red balloons, state and city officials joined civic leaders to herald this slice of Paris.
NEWS
April 13, 2000 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At Trophy Bikes in Old City - where cyclists shop for pumps, racks, blinkers and pricey, hand-made Italian racing machines - the most popular item is a low-tech freebie stacked on the front counter. The Philadelphia Bicycle Map, which cyclists say is the most sophisticated guide ever for the city's two-wheeled commuters, has gone over so well that shop owner Michael McGettigan had to order extras from the city Streets Department, which published the map with federal funds. "They flew out the door here," McGettigan said.
NEWS
January 26, 2007
Voorhees, Cherry Hill must make room to ride Re: "Time to stand up for the Stafford Horse Farm," letter, Dec. 7. I am part of the reason for the intrusion of a Rite-Aid pharmacy next to the horse farm in Voorhees, an intrusion that Lori Volpe condemns: As a baby boomer who is moving from the mid-50s to the 60s, I find myself requiring prescription drugs more and more frequently. I, too, do not want another pharmacy to replace trees. But if this is to happen, I would think it prudent for the township to give consideration to something other than tax revenue: bike lanes.
NEWS
July 19, 2008
It was a hair-raising adventure for many of the folks on foot who carefully made their way to the center lanes of Benjamin Franklin Parkway for Thursday's public announcement of a welcome $17.1 million plan to upgrade the boulevard. Cars whizzed along the outer lanes as usual, making some pedestrians' journey a potential life-and-death moment. Gov. Rendell and Mayor Nutter needed no better illustration of why the Parkway needs to be more pedestrian-friendly. Their announcement was welcome to those who have waged a years-long effort to wrest back the Parkway from car and truck traffic.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 26, 2012
City Council and Mayor Nutter are about to set smarter rules of the road for bicyclists, pedestrians, and motorists - making this a fine time to push ahead with plans to make Philadelphia the next great city with a bicycle-sharing program. A bill before Council could improve safety for cyclists and pedestrians alike by imposing fines of up to $75 for riding on sidewalks or running a red light. Drivers could be fined for parking in a bike lane or opening car doors into oncoming bicycle traffic.
NEWS
November 13, 2012
MAYBE MY "paranoia" is spreading. A while back, while commenting on the freewheeling "bicycle issue," I speculated that the city seemed to be waging an undeclared war on the automobile. That's just crazy, I was told, despite radical bikeheads' ongoing demonization of automobiles. Now comes Philadelphia magazine, with a big splash this month about how Philly (despite evidence to the contrary) is getting smarter, plus younger and cooler. It included a few paragraphs headlined, "Carless Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | Daily News staff report
A two-week trial to reduce automobile traffic lanes from four to three on Market Street and JFK Boulevard, between 15th and 20th streets, to allow for bicycle lanes, did not hamper either parking nor loading and deliveries, the Mayor's Office of Transportation and Utilities said yesterday. "The trial has demonstrated that it's worth continuing to explore options for transforming Market Street and JFK west of City Hall into truly complete streets: streets that well serve pedestrians, buses, cars, delivery vehicles and bikes," said Rina Cutler, the deputy mayor for Transportation and Utilities.
NEWS
April 7, 2011
S PRING IS HERE , The weather is milder. Now the bicyclists Start riding wilder. With icy storms behind us, the city is ready to pump up bicycle lanes, like Audrey II in "Little Shop of Horrors," while shrouding its plans (to thwart opponents from organizing, I suspect). It's following the tactics of New York City, which now finds one of its "popular" (according to the city) Brooklyn bike lanes under legal attack. But, first, Philly. The Good News: Long delays - meaning cars waiting for two or three light changes to cross Broad - have been greatly reduced at Pine and Spruce, two major intersections mysteriously "overlooked" when the city did a study of wait times.
NEWS
September 26, 2010
Robert M. Kelley is an Inquirer editor If you walk much in Center City, this will sound familiar: You wait for the light to change, start crossing with the walk signal. Then - at the last second - you see a bicycle bearing down on you against the light. You stop just before it hits you - even though you had the right-of-way. A close call for you, but here's the bicyclists' side: They are trying to keep up with the fast flow of motor-vehicle traffic - often not by their own choosing but because of the shortage of bicycle lanes - yet they do not feel bound to observe lights or crossings.
NEWS
July 15, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a bid to increase bicycling in Philadelphia, the city plans to designate one lane along two major streets - Spruce and Pine - for bikes, leaving the other lane for all vehicular traffic. City workers will paint new lines along both streets, from river to river, officials said, with the pilot project beginning around Labor Day. Philadelphia currently has 32 miles of multiuse trails (no cars) and 205 miles of bicycle lanes - but only four miles of dedicated lanes in Center City.
NEWS
October 4, 2008
When the Benjamin Franklin Parkway was modeled on the Champs-?lys?es a century ago, Philadelphians stumbled over one critically important detail: They failed to include the sidewalk cafes. Until this week. On Monday, the first year-round cafe on the Parkway opened on a triangular slice of Fairmount Park land at 16th Street near JFK Plaza's LOVE Park. At a festive ceremony amid cascades of red balloons, state and city officials joined civic leaders to herald this slice of Paris.
NEWS
July 19, 2008
It was a hair-raising adventure for many of the folks on foot who carefully made their way to the center lanes of Benjamin Franklin Parkway for Thursday's public announcement of a welcome $17.1 million plan to upgrade the boulevard. Cars whizzed along the outer lanes as usual, making some pedestrians' journey a potential life-and-death moment. Gov. Rendell and Mayor Nutter needed no better illustration of why the Parkway needs to be more pedestrian-friendly. Their announcement was welcome to those who have waged a years-long effort to wrest back the Parkway from car and truck traffic.
NEWS
January 26, 2007
Voorhees, Cherry Hill must make room to ride Re: "Time to stand up for the Stafford Horse Farm," letter, Dec. 7. I am part of the reason for the intrusion of a Rite-Aid pharmacy next to the horse farm in Voorhees, an intrusion that Lori Volpe condemns: As a baby boomer who is moving from the mid-50s to the 60s, I find myself requiring prescription drugs more and more frequently. I, too, do not want another pharmacy to replace trees. But if this is to happen, I would think it prudent for the township to give consideration to something other than tax revenue: bike lanes.
NEWS
November 9, 2006
RE "Why drivers go wild" (letters, Nov. 2): In his indictment of Philadelphia motorists, Len Trower suggests that we might be driving too slowly. This is about as smart as the letter-writer who argued that tavern patrons should be armed. And as for his assertion that the city's bicycle lanes are "useless," I invite Mr. Trower to join me and the thousands of other bike commuters who use these lanes daily. He'll get a different perspective on Philadelphia traffic - as well as exercise.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|