CollectionsBiden
IN THE NEWS

Biden

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 26, 2008 | DEBORAH LEAVY
THERE were things I didn't like about Sen. Joe Biden when I worked with him and his staff on the Senate Judiciary Committee when Biden was the chairman. I thought he compromised too easily and was too deferential to the committee's Republicans. But the qualities I didn't much appreciate then may be just what is necessary now if Barack Obama is to reach out and win over the voters he needs to prevail in this election. The choice of Biden for the second slot on the Democratic ticket has been greeted with much praise, including from several GOP senators.
NEWS
September 21, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Sen. Joseph Biden, a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination, misrepresented his university record in a videotaped campaign appearance, Newsweek said in an article published yesterday. The magazine cited a videotape (shown on April 12 on the C-SPAN cable network) of an informal session in New Hampshire in which the Delaware senator talks about his performance at Syracuse Law School. Newsweek said the videotape shows Biden telling the group he attended law school on a full academic scholarship and graduated in the top half of his class.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | By REGINALD STUART, Daily News Staff Writer
Calling the actions "dumb mistakes," presidential candidate Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del., yesterday admitted past use of material written by others without crediting them for it. Colleagues and other political observers said they did not think the admissions damaged Biden's credibility and expressed confidence in him. At a news conference called to answer press charges, Biden admitted that during his first semester of law school at Syracuse University...
NEWS
September 8, 1988 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. flashed a bright smile as he walked briskly through Union Station to Capitol Hill yesterday for his first day back on the job in seven months. And, as colleagues greeted him warmly, the Delaware senator frankly acknowledged that the early failure of his presidential bid probably saved his life. Biden, 45, had spent the last year fighting plagiarism charges that forced him out of the presidential race, two near-fatal aneurysms in the brain and a blood clot.
NEWS
September 27, 1987 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Washington Bureau
For those who knew him as good old Joe, he was a man of compassion, a man of few frailties. He didn't smoke and didn't drink - but Joe surely did talk. Some considered it his only vice. So it was that when Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. talked his way out of the 1988 presidential race with a series of damaging gaffes, there was sympathy in his home state of Delaware, where the young Democratic senator's strengths were treasured and his weaknesses tolerated as part of the personality of good old Joe. "He's always been known in Delaware to have expanded his speeches and to speak too long," observed Samuel Shipley, a Biden supporter and chairman of the state Democratic Party.
NEWS
May 15, 1987 | By JOANNE SILLS, Daily News Staff Writer
There were the curious who came to the sweltering room on the University of Pennsylvania campus, and then there were those who looked at it as history: the chance to hear a presidential candidate in the early going, maybe to say years later, "I was there. " Sen. Joseph R. Biden, a third-term Democrat from Delaware who officially enters the Democratic presidential primary on June 9 in Wilmington, last night got attention as a serious candidate. With Gary Hart out of the race, Biden is positioned, along with Rep. Richard Gephardt of Missouri, Gov. Michael Dukakis of Massachusetts and former Gov. Bruce Babbitt of Arizona, as one of the leading candidates for the nomination.
NEWS
May 7, 1988 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware has been moved out of intensive care at Walter Reed Army Medical Center and his condition is satisfactory, a hospital spokesman said yesterday. Biden had surgery Monday to correct an aneurysm on his brain. According to a statement read by hospital spokesman Peter Esker, physicians "are satisfied with the senator's progress and have transferred him out of intensive care and into a regular room. He has been out of bed for brief periods and is on a regular diet.
NEWS
July 25, 1986 | By Jack Germond and Jules Witcover
Ever since Walter Mondale's landslide defeat in 1984, Democrats have been performing autopsies on his campaign. And while no one ailment has been isolated as the cause of that political disaster, many establishment Democrats have fingered Mondale's inability to "handle" the Rev. Jesse Jackson as a major contributor to the presidential nominee's public image of weakness. In the last two years, many Democrats have suggested that the proper course the next time around will be to treat Jackson just as if he were any other influential Democrat - with respect for his strength but without kowtowing or sparing him of criticism when it is warranted.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | By Robert S. Boyd, Inquirer Washington Bureau
There are important differences, as well as similarities, in the recent troubles of Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. and former Sen. Gary Hart, two ambitious politicians whose White House dreams have been shadowed by questions about their personal integrity. The most obvious distinction is that Hart's problems with the 'A' word - adultery - quickly knocked him out of the race for the Democratic nomination. Biden's difficulty with the 'P' word - plagiarism - has wounded but not destroyed him. For Hart, it was sudden death; for Biden, slow bleeding - though many political professionals say his candidacy is now odds-on to end in the snows of Iowa and New Hampshire next winter.
NEWS
September 23, 1987
At a time when educational excellence is becoming a national obsession, it would be nice if the next president could back inevitable exhortations to tomorrow's leaders with some proof of excellence in his or her own past. Americans are an easy-going people and don't demand that their presidents rise from the ranks of A students; they just hope that, like the children of mythical Lake Wobegon, they at least be "above average. " Delaware's Sen. Joseph Biden must have understood that yearning when he told an audience in Claremont, N.H., last spring that, after a poor start at law school, he pulled himself together and went on to finish in the top half of his class.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 21, 2016
By SaraKay Smullens When Donald Trump reared his head, vastly improving ratings for television's empires with racist views, misogyny, and simplistic solutions, I had no doubt his pulpit would grow. Millions in our country are overwhelmed by vast changes on every front. As a result, they feel diminished, powerless, enraged. Trump offers an outlet through the selection of scapegoats for ridicule, and in doing so shows that any country can become vulnerable to the horror of pre-World War II Germany.
NEWS
June 11, 2016 | By Steve Bohnel, STAFF WRITER
Fury over a six-month sentence handed to a former Stanford University athlete convicted of raping a passed-out student has spread locally on social media and among advocates who fear a chilling effect on victims. "I'm outraged along with the public," said Barbara Ashcroft, an associate professor at Temple University's law school and former chief of the Montgomery County Sex Crimes Unit. "I think when you look at the tone at what is happening with millennials ... we're seeing judges that basically give a slap on the wrist.
NEWS
May 23, 2016
ISSUE | ABORTION Tainted Biden honor As a 63-year-old practicing Catholic with 16 years of Catholic education, I find it dismaying that the University of Notre Dame would honor Vice President Biden at its May 15 commencement with the Laetare Medal, given for "outstanding service to the church and society" ("Biden, Boehner share award," Monday). To do so is hypocritical given that Catholic bishops have called for Biden to refrain from receiving Communion because of the Obama administration's pro-choice stance.
NEWS
May 17, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
An army of federal agents, bomb-sniffing K-9 dogs, and local police protected Vice President Biden and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at Franklin Field on Sunday night while Trump watched his daughter Tiffany and Biden saw his granddaughter Naomi graduate from the University of Pennsylvania's School of Arts & Sciences. Trump arrived to warm applause from his section but when Biden arrived a few minutes later, the entire stadium erupted in cheering and waving, and he responded by vigorously waving back.
NEWS
May 4, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
About 1,500 students in the University of Pennsylvania's School of Arts and Sciences will collect their diplomas at a ceremony on May 15, but not all eyes will be on them. Both Donald Trump and Joe Biden will be in the audience - not as presidential candidate and sitting vice president, but as parent and grandparent of two graduates: Trump's 22-year-old daughter, Tiffany (with former wife Marla Maples), and Biden's granddaughter Naomi. Security will be especially tight, and Penn will be advising parents and students to get there early.
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, STAFF WRITER
The vice president slipped into a booth at the Mayfair Diner next to a trio of middle-aged women. "I don't mean to interrupt you," he said, grinning. "In fact, I did mean to interrupt you. " For the next half-hour, Biden worked the tables inside the narrow diner on Frankford Avenue with his trademark charm. He was on hand to campaign for U.S. Senate candidate Katie McGinty, who introduced herself to diners as "a good Northeast girl" with the accent to prove it. Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr. (D, Pa.)
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
The single best way to strengthen the country is to invest in its students, Vice President Biden told a group of professors, students, and administrators at Community College of Philadelphia on Monday. He was there to announce an Obama administration plan to spend $100 million to expand education and training programs that give community college students skills most in demand by employers. The plan includes the president's initiative to offer tuition-free education to community college students, a proposal he announced last year.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
University scholars who work under threat in countries that suppress academic freedom will be offered "safe haven" through a new endowment established in honor of Beau Biden, late son of the vice president. The $1 million gift, from an anonymous donor, will pay for one scholar each year to move to an American university and work free from danger. The Institute of International Education announced the gift Friday afternoon at a news conference at the University of Delaware's campus in Wilmington.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari and Chris Brennan, STAFF WRITERS
WASHINGTON - President Obama and Vice President Biden endorsed Katie McGinty in Pennsylvania's U.S. Senate race Wednesday, adding the White House imprint to one of the country's most closely watched Senate races. "Katie is a true champion for working families," Obama said in a statement released by the McGinty campaign. It was a rare example of the president stepping so directly into a party primary - though one that doesn't always work. In 2010, Obama endorsed then-Sen. Arlen Specter in the Democratic primary for the same seat, but Joe Sestak ultimately won the nomination.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|