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Big Al

NEWS
October 11, 1995 | By Ralph Cipriano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The boys at Frankie Blues' clubhouse were operating at peak efficiency. Out on the back porch, where the bees were buzzing, Big Al and Tony the Cop were dumping 36-pound boxes of cabernet sauvignon grapes into an automatic crusher and destemmer. The machine pumped a mound of bare stems out the back and a stream of mashed grapes out the front. The grapes surged through a thick hose that ran through a cellar window. Downstairs, at the other end of the hose, Frankie Blues was up to his elbows in a 60-gallon vat of cold, foamy, pink and purple grapes.
NEWS
November 30, 1994 | by Harriet Lessy, Daily News Staff Writer The Washington Post, Daily News wire services and Daily News classical music writer Tom DiNardo contributed to this report
A negative reaction to new blood- pressure medication forced Baltimore Symphony music director David Zinman to cancel several concerts with the Philadelphia Orchestra, including last night's Carnegie Hall gig. Flying to the rescue at the 11th hour for the New York performance was Andrew Davis, conductor of the BBC Symphony Orchestra in London. Doctors told Zinman to lay down the baton for two weeks. That leaves Yo-Yo Ma, who plays with the orchestra Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Dec. 6, scrambling for a new program.
NEWS
October 9, 1994 | By Nicole Pensiero, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Al "Big Al" Szolack had his success at basketball, playing for the Washington Generals - the perennial competition of the Harlem Globetrotters - but then one day his mother died, and Szolack, in his grief, turned to drugs. The successful career ended, his fiancee dumped him, and Szolack didn't know where to turn. Fortunately, he made one last stab at his relationship, visiting his fiancee's mother and pouring out his heart. "She gave me a hug and sent me for help," Szolack said.
NEWS
November 1, 1993 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Phillies pitcher Curt Schilling was racking up those phenomenal postseason numbers, the ALS Association's tote board was rattling away. In the preseason, Schilling and his wife, Shonda, had pledged $10 for each strikeout Schilling tallied, $100 for each complete game, and so on. Phillies second baseman Mariano Duncan made similar pledges, based on his batting statistics for '93. When the dust settled, the Schillings had raised, through...
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | By Josh Zimmer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"Big Al," his taut 6-foot-5, 210-pound frame illuminated under a bright Delran High School auditorium light, was disappointed at the turnout. "I guess this goes to show why our problems in communities and schools are (increasing) . . . because of the apathy of parents," he said to about 200 students and parents seated in the auditorium. After two days of preaching his highly emotional "Do Hugs Not Drugs" message to Delran's middle and high school students, Big Al - his real name is Al Szolack - had invited parents to join their children in a large support- group session May 18 to air problems and bridge emotional gaps.
SPORTS
May 26, 1992 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Big Al has won the Indianapolis 500 a record-tying four times. Uncle Bobby has three Indy victories. Now, Little Al knows how it feels to park in victory lane at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and have the cheers of the estimated 400,000 sweep over him. "It's every bit what I thought it was going to be, plus more," Al Unser Jr. said Sunday after outdueling Canadian Scott Goodyear by 43-thousandths of a second in the closest finish in...
SPORTS
July 28, 1989 | By Tim Kawakami, Daily News Sports Writer
Quietly, almost invisibly last season, Seth Joyner rapped his fingers on the door of potential stardom. The Eagles' strong-side linebacker collected 136 tackles, 4 interceptions and 3 1/2 sacks last year - statistics that match up with almost any linebacker around. He was a buoy for a wildly unsteady defense, by staying steady even as everything else crumbled behind him and giving assistance where he could. "He played great football," coach Buddy Ryan said. "What did he have, five or six interceptions last year?
NEWS
March 31, 1988 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Alfred V. "Big Al" Rudzinski, a machinist and a decorated veteran of the Korean War, died Sunday of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. He was 57 and lived in the Kensington section of Philadelphia. Big Al, or "Alfy" as he was known as a youngster in the old neighborhood at 21st and Brandywine streets in Fairmount, was a skilled machinist and mechanic. He worked for the Inquirer for about 10 years, through the 1960s and 1970s, SEPTA and several other Philadelphia companies and on the DEW (Distant Early Warning)
NEWS
February 15, 1988 | By BARBARA BECK, Daily News Staff Writer
On behalf of the faculty and staff here at Nightlife University, a fully accredited higher-education fabrication, I'd like to welcome you to our daily seminar: "Nightlife on the University of Pennsylvania Campus: What Is It, How Did It Get Here, Where Do I Park?" I'll be leading today's session, which focuses on the newly opened shops and cafe at 3401 Walnut St. As always with these nightlife seminars, there will be some homework - or, rather, some away-from-home work. If your thirst for knowledge has already taken you to, say, Cinnabon or Ribchicks or Benetton, you have a head start on the assignment.
NEWS
September 22, 1987 | By JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writer
Big Al wants to get the old gang together. Whiskers, Yabo, Bugger, Wild Bill, Slim . . . All of 'em. All the guys and girls who used to hang out at No Name, smoke "loosies" in Billy Bob's Alley, and swig quarts of "Schmidtos" and Ortlieb's on the sly out of brown paper bags on Friday nights. That was many, many swigs ago. And now Big Al is trying to put together a reunion of all guys and gals whose lives at one time revolved around a street corner in Kensington, a corner like hundreds of others in the city where young people would meet to end the day, to start a night.
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