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Big Bang

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NEWS
September 10, 1992 | For The Inquirer / SCOTT ROWAN
A show of firepower had onlookers ducking and flinching at the Hagley Museum in Wilmington on Labor Day. In addition to touring the 240-acre estate, the original Du Pont mills, spectators could watch a special "Big Bang" presentation, in which cannons and gunpowder were fired.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2010
9:31 tonight CHANNEL 3 Learn how Leonard and Sheldon (Johnny Galecki, right; Jim Parsons, left) first met and moved in together. The story unfolds as Leonard tells it to Penny (Kaley Cuoco).
NEWS
January 15, 1998 | BY JOHN ALLEN PAULOS
New data lend support to the idea that the universe will continue to expand forever and is potentially infinite. While these studies resolve some mysteries, they leave others untouched. For instance, it doesn't take an analytic philosopher to feel uneasy when applying temporal and spatial concepts to cosmology. In these new studies, the term "Big Bang" is seemingly used in a standard way, but is it? "Five minutes before Super Bowl kickoff" makes sense, but what is meant by "five minutes before the Big Bang"?
NEWS
January 17, 1997
The word from two University of Michigan astronomers that the universe has, oh, about 10 to the 100th power years to live is kind of a tough break for a lot of politicians. Clearly, they'd been hoping the world's dying whimper would come before they were forced to deal with some thorny issues that scare the incumbency-loving daylights out of them. But they'll be getting no cosmological reprieve, according to scientists Fred Adams and Greg Laughlin, who've plotted the course of the universe to the end of the current starry era, through a "degenerate era" (and you thought we were already there)
NEWS
November 2, 2009 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
As one might imagine, explosions figure heavily in Flashpoint Theatre's production of Peter Sinn Nachtrieb's boom, though as its lowercase title indicates, there ultimately will be less bang, more whimper. There are plenty of explosions to worry about: explosions that created us and will end us, explosions psychic and sexual, and each - from the galactic to the individual - beyond our control. Between explosions, we eat, sleep, try to make sense of things, worry that we won't make sense of them before whatever impending threat has its way with us, and occasionally, relieve this tension alone or aided by others . . . others we've met after a cosmic coin toss that somehow permits us to connect, but could easily go the other way. To this end, boom's Jules (Derick Loafmann)
NEWS
July 3, 1987 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
What's the ticket for a winning July 4th celebration? Philly's best bet looks like Jeffrey Osborne, the pop/soul balladeer performing tomorrow night on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway as special guest star with the Philly Pops. "The home team almost always wins when I sing the National Anthem," Osborne told me the other day, so he's expecting to do the same tomorrow as his "patriotic" contribution to our July 4th celebration. "This is serious. I've been doing the National Anthem for professional sports teams since '79 - for the Lakers, Raiders, 49ers, Dodgers, Astros, and Phoenix Suns.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
WE'VE COVERED some bizarre lawsuits over the years in Tattle, but this is a gem: According to Entertainment Weekly , Ellen Newlin Chase and Margaret Chase Perry . the daughters and heirs of New Hampshire teacher Edith Newlin , have filed a "copyright infringement action" against the producers of "The Big Bang Theory," CBS and various media partners. At issue? "Soft Kitty," Sheldon's beloved childhood song. According to legal documents, "The lyrics - beginning with the words 'Soft kitty, warm kitty'" were created as a poem by Newlin in the 1930s and published by Willis Music Company in 1937 as part of the book Songs for the Nursery School . Kevin Cranley , president of Willis Music, who says he worked out a rights deal for the song with producers, posted a blog entry last May confirming "Soft Kitty's" inclusion in the book, but credited its creation to writer Laura Pendleton MacCartney . Newlin's daughters are seeking unspecified "remedies for willful copyright infringement.
NEWS
December 4, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Toni Nelson listened to the sound of her voice making the 911 call and seven years evaporated. Tears ran down her cheeks, her hand covered her mouth, as the 911 audio tape intoned "June 15, 2008, 1:28.46 a.m.," and then Nelson's voice: "I heard a big bang and he's down. There's a man lying on the sidewalk in front of my house. " So began testimony Wednesday in the trial of Marcellus Jones, charged with slaying 23-year-old Minnesota teaching student Beau Zabel to take his iPod.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comic book adaptations seem to be getting darker, bleaker, and harder-edged by the year. Just look at the history of Batman, from the 1960s TV show to Christopher Nolan's extraordinary Dark Knight trilogy. A dark spirit also is at work in Fox's beautifully conceived Gotham , which will return Sept. 21 for its second season. Developed by Bruno Heller, whose credits include HBO's Rome and CBS' The Mentalist , Gotham isn't exactly a superhero story. Set during Bruce Wayne's childhood (played on the show by 14-year-old actor David Mazouz)
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer and Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writers
Emergency crews remain at the highway ramp where an oil tanker overturned and burst into flames in Pennsauken Monday morning, authorities said. The accident occurred on Route 130 northbound at the ramp to Route 90. Some news outlets reported that the driver of the tanker was accounted for, and there did not appear to be any other vehicles involved. The fire sent thick black smoke billowing into the sky that could be seen for miles around, including in Northeast Philadelphia. Authorities said a crash team would try to determine the cause of the accident and whether ice or snow was a contributing factor.
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
It makes sense that the consumerist boom that followed World War II would produce some great retail architecture. If you travel Center City's shopping streets, you can still see a few of the exuberant storefronts that emerged in the '50s and '60s, before shopping migrated to the suburban malls. One of the best examples is a shimmering black-and-white facade at 12th and Chestnut that stands out from its traditional neighbors. The building itself dates from 1909, but in 1962, Colonial Federal Savings Bank commissioned a makeover from architect Lee Casaccio.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
So much to see and hear. So little time. Or maybe a surfeit of time. That's the promise of the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts, which begins its second monthlong citywide splash this week - two years after a rousing debut of more than 135 performances and events wrapping up with a street fair on the Avenue of the Arts that drew more than 200,000. This time, the festival, though smaller, returns with a bang, as in the Big Bang of almost 14 billion years ago, although this weekend the oldest moment being evoked is only between three and four billion, when life emerged from the primordial soup.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013
Penn Dixie Productions Animal Animal Mammal Mine . This dance-theater piece - inspired by the changes wrought by the Pill, enriched by interviews with 50 childless women, and involving an installation by sculptor Martha Posner - creates a vision of female fertility and ecological collapse. (Underground Arts, April 10 to 20.) Taller Puertorriqueño Sounds of Rhythm and Resistance . With a nod to the abolition of slavery in Puerto Rico in 1873 and a stomp to Afro-Puerto Rican bomba, Pleneros de la 21's music foments Kulu Mele African Dance and Drum Ensemble and Familia Rojas' multigenerational ensemble to dance the drums.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By John Heilprin, Associated Press
GENEVA, Switzerland - The world's largest and most powerful atom smasher goes into a two-year hibernation in March, as engineers carry out a revamp to help it reach maximum energy levels that could lead to more stunning discoveries after the detection of the so-called God particle. With the reopening of its $10 billion proton collider in early 2015, the stage will be set for observing more rare phenomena - and unlocking more mysteries, said James Gillies, chief spokesman for the European particle physics laboratory known as CERN.
NEWS
January 9, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
Several astute readers have e-mailed me to point out that even if scientists find an explanation for the origin of life from nonliving matter, they haven't explained where the inanimate matter came from. Our universe has a lot of it. Who created all that? "If there are 500 million Earth-like planets, where did any of them come from? Something cannot come from absolute nothing without the concept of a Divine Designer," wrote one reader. Others reminded me of the principle of conservation of energy: "What happened to the First Law of Thermodynamics?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the beginning there was the Big Bang, and then free food and frontal nudity, also called the Garden of Eden. Or that's how it goes in a zany 70-minute show called The Big Bang , at the Kimmel Center for an October run. Any show whose lyrics rhyme Caesar and geezer has me as its sucker, but Jed Feuer's music and Boyd Graham's lyrics and script hooked me with more than slick wordplay - the whole concept is a hoot. We're all supposed to be sitting in the Park Avenue living room of a wealthy couple while two characters - named Jed and Boyd, like the authors - and their pianist hold what's called a "backers' audition.
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