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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2010
9 tonight CHANNEL 3 Remember your college roomie from hell? How long would you spend with him or her for a shot at $500,000? Tonight we find out who takes home the jackpot.
NEWS
November 2, 2007
YES, my friends, since the late '50s I've been told Big Brother was coming. Well, lo and behold, the land of the free is no longer. Understand, I'm not saying all this is healthy, but where's our choice? You can no longer smoke in most places, but they sure as heck want our tobacco-tax money. What about owners deciding what their clients want? What's wrong with a "Smoking permitted" sign? Let the people choose to go in or stay away. Same for transfats - let people choose, we do have some smarts!
NEWS
July 18, 2002 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
PICTURE THIS: An Arabic-looking man loses his high-speed Internet connection. He calls Comcast. They send somebody out to the house for repair. When the Comcast representative arrives, he sees what be believes to be bomb-making material and a model of the Walt Whitman Bridge sitting on the kitchen table. Would a call to authorities be in order? I assume that your answer, like my own, is "Hell yes!" It's a no-brainer. And I'll bet you agree that the same would apply to a plumber, meter reader, telephone man or letter carrier.
NEWS
May 17, 1994 | by Chris Mitchell, New York Daily News
At the moment of deepest grief in "Crooklyn," Spike Lee's paean to family life in Bedford-Stuyvesant in the early '70s, the oldest brother reaches out for his younger sister's hand, redeeming with one small gesture his years of petty selfishness. The tender act could not be further removed from the way Lee's character in "Do the Right Thing" ignited the summer of 1989, by throwing a garbage can through the window of a white man's pizzeria, but the gentle act of atonement punctuates "Crooklyn" just as effectively.
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | by Richard Huff, New York Daily News
The people behind CBS' reality competition "Big Brother" will continue to be mocked by a grassroots group that has been flying banners over the show's house, according to the head of the group. Jeff Oswald, a free-lance videographer who claims responsibility for some of the banners over the house, said this week the group is conducting "culture jamming," which he described as using legal avenues to mock the media. "This is the first thing that we've tried, and we've been getting some interesting feedback," Oswald said.
NEWS
January 4, 2006 | By Terri Akman
Cameras here, cameras there, cameras everywhere. Whether we are shopping in a store, picking our kids up at school, or merely grabbing the dry cleaning, Big Brother is watching - and in many cases recording - our every move. While it feels creepy to know we are being watched, in many instances these cameras have helped nab criminals or prevent crimes from occurring. Recently, the surveillance camera in ShopRite came through for me in a way I couldn't have imagined. After checking out an unusually large order, the cashier asked for my Price Plus card, which would give me savings on items I had purchased.
NEWS
August 13, 2002
The 1,200 new closed-circuit cameras that airport officials want to mount throughout Los Angeles Airport (LAX) to thwart terrorists would join cameras already spying on Christian youth groups proselytizing on the stairs of the Lincoln Monument and union organizers discussing strategy on the sidewalks of Virginia Beach, Va.. . . Since 9/11, the government has thrown its formidable weight onto the security side of the tenuous balance between safety and...
NEWS
July 26, 2005
IN HIS JULY 19 column, Stu Bykofsky makes the incredible claim: "Once you allow smoking prohibitions in public places, Government Busybodies soon will stick their long noses into private spaces. " That has to be the stupidest pseudo-attempt at logic I've ever read. Governments regulate hundreds, if not thousands or tens of thousands, of activities in public areas that are perfectly permissible in private spaces. Rules ranging from public-nudity regulations to no swimming in certain fountains have absolutely no private equivalent whatsoever.
SPORTS
October 28, 1999 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
The racing Burton brothers are having satisfying seasons. There is, however, one major difference: Jeff has won six races and Ward has a zero in the win column. Ward also isn't crazy about the number 2 these days. For the third time this year, Ward finished runner-up to the younger Jeff in Sunday's Winston Cup race at North Carolina Speedway. While Jeff has been kind toward Ward, many older brothers know how annoying it can be to continually finish behind a younger sibling.
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NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, STAFF WRITER
When 16-year-old Asir Brown was killed in a drive-by shooting at a holiday cookout in South Philadelphia near midnight Sunday, he became at least the sixth victim under age 18 killed by gunfire in the city this year. Now Brown's family and friends are left wondering why his life was taken. "I still don't even believe my little brother is gone," Ameer Brown, 19, said Tuesday. "Why would you take somebody who was next out of the 'hood?" Asir Brown's former coach with the South Philly Hurricanes, Terry Bennett, called his slaying "tragic.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
Alex Law was still too young to serve in Congress when he started running for it in 2014 - a year and a half before he turned 25 in March. And then he got clobbered in Tuesday's Democratic primary. Unlike his First Congressional District opponent, U.S. Rep. Donald Norcross, the brash NYU grad from Voorhees possessed neither a political resumé nor a political machine. But Law, with a face made for Facebook, quickly became a savvy and sassy presence on social media. He refused to shut up, publishing anti-Norcross screeds on platforms such as the Huffington Post.
NEWS
June 2, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
IN THE U.S. Courthouse, they refer to it as "the Miracle on Market Street," that moment on Sept. 26 when the work of federal law-enforcement officials led to a baby with a terminal illness getting a kiss from Pope Francis in front of Independence Hall. After her papal peck, Gianna Masciantonio's condition improved, and on Tuesday, the 19-month-old was present and lively as her big brother, 5-year-old Dominic, was sworn in as an honorary deputy U.S. marshal at the courthouse at 601 Market St. The marshals, the FBI, and the Secret Service said they wanted to honor the Masciantonio family and that singular moment that brought hope to many - including law-enforcement officials.
SPORTS
March 25, 2016 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
CLEARWATER , Fla. - It's an old joke, an old line: Nobody beats up my brother - except for me. If you're an older brother, you know the phrase by heart. If you're the younger brother, you know that its true meaning has less to do with violence than it has to do with love. Big brothers give it to you straight up. No cream. No sugar. Black. "He's a guy I still look up to, a guy I still learn from," Aaron Nola was saying the other day about big brother, Austin.
NEWS
January 23, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
Big Brothers Big Sisters of America Corp. has agreed to pay the federal government $1.6 million for violating regulations that guided three grants it received from the Justice Department. Big Brothers Big Sisters, a nonprofit that provides mentoring services to boys and girls throughout the United States, was headquartered in Philadelphia at the time the grants were received between 2009 and 2011. It is now based in Tampa, Fla. "They knowingly said they had financial management systems in place to monitor use of funds, and those systems were in fact not in place," said Joel Sweet, assistant U.S. attorney in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2016
Marcus Allen, 43, leads the Big Brothers Big Sisters Independence Region, but when the former pro basketball player applied to be a "Big," and mentor a youngster, his own group turned him down. "I'm the CEO. I sign the checks," Allen said. "They said, 'Well, Marcus, I hate to deliver this news, but you can't be a Big right now.' " It turns out the staff decided that his recent divorce and full plate of duties at the group made him too busy for the job. "They were not sure that I would have the time, given all the things that I was doing," he said.
SPORTS
August 12, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Averee Robinson shows his love and admiration for his late brother, Adrian, every time he puts on his Temple football uniform. A junior defensive lineman, Robinson has switched from No. 73 to 43, which was the number Adrian Robinson wore with the Owls before he played in the NFL. In May, the Robinson family, who hail from Harrisburg, were struck by tragedy when Adrian Robinson died at age 25 in what was ruled a suicide. Adrian Robinson played 50 games for Temple and was named Mid-American Conference defensive player of the year as a sophomore linebacker in 2009.
NEWS
May 28, 2015
LET ME START by saying that this letter in response to Christine Flower's recent column is written with complete bias. However, my bias comes from knowing who and what I am writing about. Unlike you, Christine, I first noticed Jim Kenney 55 years ago. He was hard to miss, as he was the kid in the bed on the other side of the room we shared. Oh, my God, Christine, did that make us domestic partners? Alas, no - just brothers. Whew, that was close. So, let's begin with my problems with what you wrote: First off, it is quite clear that you have had little or no personal interaction with Jim prior to your character assassination of him and his views.
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