CollectionsBig Business
IN THE NEWS

Big Business

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 16, 1994 | BY JOHN JONIK
Humans evolved, as did all living things, into their present forms through the process of mutations of mutations of mutations . . . all the way back to the dawn of earth life. Everything biologically-connected is a descendant of a rebel, a spinoff from and an improvement on the biological and social establishment. No mutations were created based on mere whim or transient predictions or ignorant, limited wishes until, of course, the age of humans, especially in modern times. Now rebellious mutations are not allowed to flower or even be tested because of self-serving establishment business.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | By ISHMAEL REED
Black pathology is big business. Two-thirds of teenage mothers are white, two-thirds of welfare recipients are white, and white youths commit most of the crime in this country. According to a recent survey, reported by the Oakland (Calif.) Tribune, the typical crack addict is a middle-class white male in his 40s. Michele Norris of the Washington Post has cited a study that discovered "no significant difference in the rate of drug use during pregnancy among women in the public clinics that serve a largely indigent population and those visiting private doctors who cater to upper-income patients.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | By Jack Engelhard, Special to The Inquirer
What about that Robin Roberts you threw out when cleaning the basement? Well, not to rub it in or anything, but it could now be worth as much as $12,000. At a recent baseball card show at the T.J. Maxx Marketplace at the Bucks County Mall in Feasterville, the kids and adults were wisely aware of the following simple fact, one that escaped some of us when we were growing up: Collecting baseball cards may be a hobby, but it's also a business. "I'd rather spend my money on something that'll increase in value, rather than decrease, like food," said an astute Brian Schorn, 14, of Feasterville.
NEWS
April 4, 2010 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A landscaping crew was out repairing Joseph V. Mastronardo Jr.'s Montgomery County lawn Friday, two days after law enforcement people had ripped it up with shovels and backhoes. The crew replaced shrubs and plantings and filled in holes, the residue of Wednesday's raid. Sources say investigators seized nearly $1 million found in the home and buried in the yard. Mastronardo, 60, and his brother and business partner John, 54, were arrested and jailed to await a hearing later this week.
SPORTS
August 19, 2004 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the tightly controlled corporate atmosphere surrounding the modern Olympics, it's probably easier to smuggle weapons of mass destruction into venues than unsponsored products. Big Olympic sponsors such as Visa, Coke and Kodak have all the business in those places sewn up tighter than Andy Reid's jeans. So yesterday, when a lunchtime cleanup crew at a McDonald's discovered an empty Pepsi bottle on a table, they reacted as if it were terrorist-grade sarin. A gloved woman gingerly lifted the dangerous contraband and handed it to a fellow employee.
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | BY MSGR. S.J. ADAMO
Since the days of Marco Polo, China has intrigued the Western world. For those raised on the other side of the world, China is a land of a thousand mysteries and exotic beauties. It is the land and people enshrined in Pearl Buck's fabulous novel, "The Good Earth. " It is a civilization where good manners and a simple lifestyle dominate the ways of its nearly infinite population. It is almost timeless, having developed its culture centuries before Europe, at a time when Rome was struggling to emerge from the Tiber.
NEWS
August 22, 1994 | by Lewis Beale, New York Daily News
This fall, "Frankenstein" will come to life in more ways than one. Just as director Kenneth Branagh's take on the Mary Shelley classic hits movie theaters in November, bookstores will be flooded with two versions of the story: the 1818 original and a new paperback edition based on the screenplay, known in the trade as a novelization. Call it what you want, it's still big business. With novelizations, "you tap into a market of book buyers who are maybe not reading The New York Times Book Review but are readers and are looking for something they're familiar with," says Peter Borland, head of the film and TV division at Signet Books.
SPORTS
May 5, 2011 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
In the Pacific Northwest, Bigfoot is big business. There are fan clubs and podcasts dedicated to the legend, and local police stations often field calls from true believers eager to report the latest sighting. The Loch Ness Monster enjoys the same sort of attention in Scotland. Nessie even has her (his?) own website. Here in Philly, Chase Utley is building toward that kind of crazy cult treatment. At this point, the patellar tendinitis in his right knee should have its own PR handler.
NEWS
February 1, 1987 | By Kathy Boccella, Special to The Inquirer
In September, Larry Fryer moved his auto-parts business from Exton to Valley Forge. Then he and his family moved to Florida. He runs his business from a post-office box in Valley Forge, an upscale address that he said gave his company "a little prestige. " "I wanted to overcome the image that the business was run out of a back yard or van. Actually, it's presenting a bit of a corporate image," he said. Like Fryer, hundreds of out-of-town businesses rent post-office boxes in Valley Forge, a tiny village adjacent to Valley Forge National Park on Route 23. Customer demand is so great that the Valley Forge Post Office is planning an expansion, and a commercial mail-box service recently opened nearby.
NEWS
August 17, 2010
The remark attributed to Philadelphia Folk Festival director Levi Landis referring to the "Old Guard" of the festival having trouble negotiating the hill speaks volumes about why the festival is in trouble ("Different folk," Sunday). Back in the '60s or '70s, nobody would have dissed older folkies. We honored the bearers of traditions. Two years ago, my wife and I, both 59 at the time, brought our young adult daughter and her wheelchair-bound friend to an evening concert. There were no provisions for the handicapped, though we finally managed to bull our way through with our car into the artists' closed area, so we could get him down to the stage level, where he could maneuver his way to the lawn on his own, instead of having to be wheeled to a seat.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 28, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the 2000s, gallery owner and painter Perry Milou was a regular on the Rittenhouse Square scene and in Philadelphia gossip columns. If a sports team was whipping the city into a frenzy with a championship run, Milou was on the case, painting populist portraits, variously, of the 2001 76ers, the 2005 Eagles, the 2008 Phillies, and even Triple Crown contender Smarty Jones. Now, the self-described "fine pop" artist (and 2003 Daily News "Sexy Single") has tapped into the city's latest obsession: the impending visit of Pope Francis for the World Meeting of Families on Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
From the archive of Carolyn Hax's columns.   Question: My (much) younger sister's boyfriend is planning to propose on her 21st birthday. I am horrified. My sister still has a year left of college. Neither one has ever lived independently - both are living with their parents in our small hometown. The boyfriend, while he has a college degree, only recently took his first salaried job - certainly not a job anyone would want to make into a career. His mom pressured him into immediately buying a condo locally.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new group - backed by the region's largest health insurer, its top academic medical centers, Comcast Corp., and others - wants to roll out the red carpet for health-care start-ups in the Philadelphia region. The Health Care Innovation Collaborative grew out of a CEO Council for Growth task force chaired by John Fry, president of Drexel University, and Dan Hilferty, president and chief executive of Independence Blue Cross. The collaborative is to be announced Wednesday at the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce's annual State of the Region meeting in Center City.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Amid the fallout of casino closures and tumbling employment, officials announced Tuesday a sports-related tourism plan that they hope will put the resort back in the game. The nonprofit Meet AC, formed in April with $8 million in backing from the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority to attract more conventions and meetings to Atlantic City, announced the creation of the Atlantic City Sports Commission. Its mission will be to "continue to grow into a destination for sporting events" in a city that has a storied history of such competitions, from heavyweight boxing to surfing and swimming championships, said Jim Wood, Meet AC's president and chief executive.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley and Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writers
  For the last few years, Day Two of the holiday shopping season - or is it Day Three now? - has been dubbed Small Business Saturday, a day to spotlight independent entrepreneurs and encourage visits to stores not on the mall map. If the holiday traffic at three of the region's shopping destinations was any indication, the strategy might have been working. By noon Saturday, Chestnut Hill's two-lane shopping district along Germantown Avenue began filling up with cars. Shop owners sounded cautiously optimistic and said some customers were specifically trying to patronize local businesses and avoid the malls.
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
SAY HELLO to a "person" who's rich, can buy a lot more political free speech than you can, and who now, apparently, has found religion. Behold the ever-more-powerful 21st-century American corporation - which yesterday continued its winning ways at the U.S. Supreme Court in two landmark rulings that came at the expense of women's health services and the power of organized labor. In one of the most closely watched cases of the 2013-14 term that ended yesterday, a divided high court ruled 5-4 that businesses - for religious reasons - can refuse to pay for their workers' birth control under Obamacare.
NEWS
June 1, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Sen. Anthony H. Williams isn't quite running for mayor of Philadelphia yet. But he held a meeting Friday afternoon with various city, labor, and business leaders to sell them on the idea that he ought to. As though to underline the point, the West Philadelphia Democrat showcased his campaign advisers: 270 Strategies, based in Washington, widely credited with masterminding the grassroots efforts that were part of President Obama's campaigns....
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 40 years running Talluto's Authentic Italian Food Inc. - stores on Ninth Street in South Philly, and in Norristown and Ridley Park, and a Folcroft plant that makes Italian meals for ShopRite and Acme and other markets - Joe Talluto's family has survived a lot of banks. " First Pennsylvania, PNB, Continental, PNC, Progress, Citizens ," Talluto recites. Most vanished in mergers. At Citizens, his initial loan officer "was good, but he disappeared. " So Talluto moved to little DNB First (the former Downingtown National Bank)
NEWS
March 4, 2014
J ACK PRAUL, 51, of Washington Square West, co-owns Philadelphia Photographics, a digital-imaging and film photo lab in Midtown Village that has served photographers, artists and businesses since 1990. Q: How'd the biz start? A: My life partner, James Hood, who's 67, started the business. I was part of the team that came aboard in 1990 and helped set up darkrooms, build equipment and buy used equipment. I worked part time from 1990 to 1995, and in 1995 I came to work full time.
NEWS
February 7, 2014
M ELISSA Greene-Anderson, 50, of Villanova, is executive vice president of Oldies.com, an online retailer and related catalog for "oldies" music, classic movies and related merchandise. The family-owned company operates from a 60,000-square-foot warehouse in West Conshohocken and is one of the largest music and mail-order companies in the U.S. and one of the largest resellers of vinyl records. Q: Tell me about the business. A: In the '80s, we started Collectables Records, which grew to be the largest independent reissue label for music in the country.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|