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Big Cheese

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NEWS
March 12, 2013 | Michael Hinckelman, Daily News staff writer
E RAN WAJSWOL, 57, of Califon, N.J., owns the 120-acre Valley Shepherd Creamery in Long Valley, N.J., where he raises dairy sheep and makes cave-aged, farm-fed cheeses and other dairy foods, including sheep's milk yogurt, ricotta and butter. In mid-January, Wajswol (WHY-sole) opened a retail outlet at Reading Terminal Market, complete with an aging "mini-cave" and glassed-in production room. Q: What made you decide to open a store here? A: The store is really a derivative of how we do what we do. We're basically a farmstead operation, which means you own your own animals, milk 'em daily, make your own dairy products, age them yourself and sell direct.
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
IN THE HEAD-TO-HEAD battle for the second-most-powerful political job in the city, one Council member seems to have the edge - for now. Multiple City Hall sources said yesterday that Councilman Darrell Clarke has locked up the nine votes needed to become Council president. With current Council President Anna Verna retiring, the seat is up for grabs for the first time in 12 years. But sources say the fight for the top position in Council is not over. And with roughly two months before the swearing-in ceremony, the 17 members are expected to angle for better positions, committees and whatever else they may want in exchange for their vote.
NEWS
December 24, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
In this place known as the "Blueberry Capital of the World," which has also been called the most Italian place in New Jersey, they really like their provolone, especially around Christmastime. Between early December and Super Bowl Sunday, 2,800 pounds of the piquant cheese, in the shape of 10-foot-long torpedoes, will be completely sold out at Bagliani's Market, an Italian American grocery store that has elevated cheese-cutting to a celebrated annual holiday tradition. Census figures show nearly 45 percent of Hammonton's 14,700 residents are of Italian descent - only Toms River has more Italian Americans, about 30,000, but in a lesser concentration: 33 percent of the population of 89,000 people in that Ocean County township.
NEWS
May 31, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
NO MATTER HOW YOU SLICE IT, CHEESE-ROLLING CAN BE TOUGH If you think hang-gliding, sky-diving and big-game hunting are dangerous sports, apparently you've never heard of cheese-rolling. In the annual cheese-rolling contest in Cheltenham, England, on Monday, 18 of the approximately 20 contestants were injured - four of them seriously enough to be sent to the hospital. The annual competition, in which contenders vie for a giant round cheese by rolling smaller versions down Cooper's Hill, left four contestants with broken arms and legs.
LIVING
February 11, 1997 | By Mark Bowden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I was startled a few weeks ago by the outpouring of response to an article I wrote in Inquirer Magazine about my search for The Big Mahoff. The article detailed my unsuccessful efforts to persuade a New York editor to allow me to use the expression in a story. "What does it mean?" he asked. "It means the big cheese, the big shot, the big chief," I told him. "Everybody knows what mahoff means. " I was wrong. It seems neither he nor anyone else on the magazine staff had ever heard of it, and the word appears in no dictionary, not even slang dictionaries and studies of regional dialect.
NEWS
May 1, 1991 | BY MIKE ROYKO
It didn't take long for the White House to brush aside the snide questions about John "Frequent Flyer" Sununu's many trips on Air Force corporate-type jets. As it turns out, the White House chief of staff wasn't gadding about for his own pleasure or political benefit. Just about every time the pilot switched on the engines, at a minimum hourly cost of $4,000 to taxpayers, Sununu was roaring away on some important and official business. We know this because the White House has released documents showing that of 77 trips made by Sununu in the government jets, only four were for personal reasons.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Although Kevin Peoples rubbed elbows with Ronald McDonald's friend - The Grimace - earlier this week, sometime this fall, he's expected to meet a really big cheese - Mickey Mouse - at his home in Disney World's Magic Kingdom. More than 200 people gathered at a benefit in Lower Moreland Sunday to raise money to make sure that 4-year-old Kevin and his family can go to Florida. The Huntingdon Valley boy has spent the last two years in and out of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia for treatment of a tumor located behind his sinuses, said his mother, Beverly.
NEWS
November 25, 1988 | By Joanne Sills, Daily News Staff Writer
Breathlessly, then restlessly, children along yesterday's Thanksgiving Day Parade route were waiting for the big cheese: Santa Claus. Yeah, the floats were good, especially the one with the Cinderella theme, featuring Miss America, Gretchen Elizabeth Carlson. Sure, the TV stars, such as Christopher Hewett, of "Mr. Belvedere," were super. The big, big, big balloons were big, indeed, and the marching bands were awesome. But where was the fat guy in the red-and-white suit?
SPORTS
October 20, 1993 | By Gwen Knapp, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mike Schmidt, at Veterans Stadium to throw out the ceremonial first pitch before last night's game, said he often wishes he'd been like the Phillies of today - loose, fun-loving and unself-conscious. "When I see tapes of myself when I was playing, I'm a little disappointed with the way I carried myself," he said. "If I had it to do over again, I think I would have more fun with the game and with the things going on around me. " He said he was "eaten up with the pressure" of being the Phillies' big hitter, and as a result, he seemed aloof and unemotional.
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NEWS
December 24, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
In this place known as the "Blueberry Capital of the World," which has also been called the most Italian place in New Jersey, they really like their provolone, especially around Christmastime. Between early December and Super Bowl Sunday, 2,800 pounds of the piquant cheese, in the shape of 10-foot-long torpedoes, will be completely sold out at Bagliani's Market, an Italian American grocery store that has elevated cheese-cutting to a celebrated annual holiday tradition. Census figures show nearly 45 percent of Hammonton's 14,700 residents are of Italian descent - only Toms River has more Italian Americans, about 30,000, but in a lesser concentration: 33 percent of the population of 89,000 people in that Ocean County township.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | Michael Hinckelman, Daily News staff writer
E RAN WAJSWOL, 57, of Califon, N.J., owns the 120-acre Valley Shepherd Creamery in Long Valley, N.J., where he raises dairy sheep and makes cave-aged, farm-fed cheeses and other dairy foods, including sheep's milk yogurt, ricotta and butter. In mid-January, Wajswol (WHY-sole) opened a retail outlet at Reading Terminal Market, complete with an aging "mini-cave" and glassed-in production room. Q: What made you decide to open a store here? A: The store is really a derivative of how we do what we do. We're basically a farmstead operation, which means you own your own animals, milk 'em daily, make your own dairy products, age them yourself and sell direct.
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
IN THE HEAD-TO-HEAD battle for the second-most-powerful political job in the city, one Council member seems to have the edge - for now. Multiple City Hall sources said yesterday that Councilman Darrell Clarke has locked up the nine votes needed to become Council president. With current Council President Anna Verna retiring, the seat is up for grabs for the first time in 12 years. But sources say the fight for the top position in Council is not over. And with roughly two months before the swearing-in ceremony, the 17 members are expected to angle for better positions, committees and whatever else they may want in exchange for their vote.
FOOD
October 20, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Melt Down , a new grilled-cheese restaurant in North Wales (111 Garden Golf Blvd., 215-368-1113, meltdowngc.com ), has recently opened. The concept came from Aaron Nocks and Pete Howey (who also own Peace a Pizza), along with friend and grilled-cheese aficionado Tom Stuart. The menu features a few set combos, such as the Baja Melt with Monterey Jack, avocado, and chicken, and one with jumbo lump crab. There are also soups (including tomato, naturally), gluten-free bread, milk shakes, and an ice cream sandwich made with toasty pound cake.
SPORTS
February 7, 2011 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
ARLINGTON, Texas - Someday they'll be comparing the next Packers quarterback to Aaron Rodgers. Whoever it is, he'll have big shoes to fill. Rodgers now can cement his name alongside Green Bay's other great quarterbacks - Bart Starr and especially Brett Favre - after he and the Green Bay Packers put a bow on a stunning postseason with a 31-25 victory over the Steelers in Super Bowl XLV Sunday night at Cowboys Stadium. "It is a dream come true," said Rodgers, a native Californian and 49ers fan growing up. "It's what I dreamed about as a little kid watching Joe Montana and Steve Young.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2008 | By Caroline Berson INQUIRER STAFF REPORTER
Ever wonder what a one-ton block of cheddar cheese looks like? Probably not. Want to explore the life of a Revolutionary War soldier? Maybe. Need multiple firework shows to satisfy your patriotic heart? Definitely. This Fourth of July weekend, communities in the tri-state area will host an explosion of patriotic celebrations with diverse events scheduled to satisfy virtually any audience. Sunoco's Welcome America! began Saturday and culminates nine days of activities around our nation's birthplace on Sunday.
FOOD
January 25, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
A perky "personal shopper" skims along warehouse aisles - market basket in one hand, order printout in the other - assembling the order: an exotic black sea salt from India, a trio of olive oil, vinegar and olives from Italy, and, from the refrigerated cheese room, vacuum-packed wedges of an award-winning fresh chevre from Humboldt, Calif., and a creamy blue from Bavaria. The basket is inspected, the order verified, then moved on for packing. The order, which came in on the Internet at 4:45 a.m., goes out in a FedEx pickup at 12:30 p.m., less than eight hours later.
FOOD
May 12, 2005 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Buying artisanal cheese in Philadelphia - washed rind or bloomy, herbaceous or stinky - just got a little easier. Or a little harder, if you have trouble making up your mind when faced with an abundance of choices. Either way works for the owners of Di Bruno Bros. - Billy Mignucci and his cousins, Emilio and Bill. Their gleaming new two-story food emporium, which opened last week at 1730 Chestnut St., features a 300-square-foot cheese cave filled with everything from Tarentaise and Baley Hazen from Vermont, to Shropshire Blue and Colston-Bassett Stilton from England, about 500 varieties in all. And the plan, Billy Mignucci says, is to supplement that lineup with 300 additional seasonal cheeses throughout the year.
FOOD
June 28, 2000 | by Lisa Helem, Daily News Staff Writer
The Germans call it kase, the Spanish, queso, the French, fromage. Here in the states, one would simply "say cheese. " Augustin Cuberro can't help but do it when he thinks about his job as maitre de fromage - "cheesemonger" - at Le Bec-Fin. Cuberro, a 31-year-old native of Barcelona, Spain, buys, maintains and displays the cheeses for guests of the high-profile restaurant owned by Chef Georges Perrier. Handling a $4,800 monthly budget, Cuberro makes bi-weekly trips to cheese suppliers - mainly, Downtown Cheese Shop at the Reading Terminal - to stock what many critics call one of the finest cheese carts in the United States.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | by Bob Cooney, Daily News Staff Writer
University of Wisconsin tight end John Sigmund is no different than most college athletes. He craves the spotlight, dreams of the day he will be in it and works extremely hard to ensure it will come. It's the patience the 20-year-old Washington Township resident exudes in his progress that stands out, even more so than his 6-foot-6, 270-pound frame. Sigmund was a highly touted, pass-rushing defensive lineman/split end when he played football for Camden Catholic. A host of Division I schools showed interest in the then-215 pounder.
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