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Big Chill

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BUSINESS
September 29, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MYRNA LUDWIG
A large portion of the frozen food consumed in the Northeast spends time in a cold-storage warehouse in Fogelsville, near Allentown, operated by Americold of Portland, Ore. Yesterday, the company dedicated a $6 million expansion of the warehouse that will increase its size by 3 million square feet, to 10.7 million from 7.7 million. Employment is 100, and will eventually grow by 45 workers. Capacity will grow to one billion pounds from 720 million pounds a year of foods being shipped.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
Now at last, a courtroom drama starring a real Oscar-award-winning actor. Live and in color, brought to you directly from our television studio, uh, courtroom, in Manhattan: It's William Hurt v. Sandra Jennings! Roll the credits please. Sandra Jennings: A former ballet dancer, and mother of 6-year-old Alex Hurt. She claims that she was as-good-as-married to the father of their child. Five years post-split, she wants half of the $7 million he has earned since 1982. William Hurt: Father of Alex, but now husband of Heidi Henderson.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The arctic cold wave that shocked even Alaska stabbed deep into southern Texas yesterday, and the big chill extended in milder forms all the way from snowy California to the East Coast. Extreme low temperatures socked the Western states hardest, with record lows recorded in at least 22 cities. Record lows yesterday included 7 degrees at Seattle; 29 below zero at Duluth, Minn., and 22 below zero at Billings, Mont. Records also fell as far south as Texas, with lows of 4 degrees at Lubbock and 16 degrees at Wichita Falls.
FOOD
March 16, 1986 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stuff everybody knows: Eat cake with a fork, take off your hat for the National Anthem, address the parish priest as "Father," and serve the red wine at room temperature. Sure, you walk into almost any neighborhood Italian restuarant in South Philadelphia and order red wine and, invariably, find that it will be served chilled. But that doesn't mean that people in South Philadelphia don't know any better. The chilled red wine is not ignorance. It's preference. It was all summed up neatly the other night by an anonymous portly gentleman at the bar at Villa DiRoma on Ninth Steet in the Italian Market: "Room temperature is correct," he said, "but it ain't right.
NEWS
August 1, 1996 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
At Rita's Water Ice on Ridge Avenue, the craving for frozen flavors is down. "This weather's killing us," store owner Fran Weber said. The customers, he said, are buying the custard and shivering away from the water ice. Over at Cool-Aid air-conditioning contractors, business has chilled by 50 percent. "Ever since the second week of June, it's been terrible," owner and president Ellis Gray sighed. Across Philadelphia and down the shore, and throughout the Northeast region generally, this summer has been a bummer for those who like their weather hot and dry - and for businesses that thrive on arid climates.
SPORTS
July 4, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
Maybe there isn't a secret committee in an undisclosed location running the nation's sports leagues and associations. But it sure seems that way sometimes. Maybe it's just ESPN, making sure there is never a lull in news and programming. Either way, what used to be the slow summer months of June and July somehow have been transformed into Transaction Season. The long-standing buildup to baseball's trade deadline has been turbo-boosted by the, er, coincidental scheduling of NBA and NHL draft and free-agency activity.
NEWS
May 9, 1986 | BY JAMES R. ROEBUCK
The cold winter chill this year, as with the past five, has been heightened by a particularly frigid jet stream. No Arctic Alberta Clipper ripping across America this time, but a more menacing variety equally cool of heart and soul. Yes, the Gipper Clipper originates off the Potomac, and has repeatedly delivered the Big Chill to Americans desiring a better life. Once again, the wintry blast resonates with socio-economic inequities - afflict the poor and middle class, while comforting the affluent.
NEWS
February 13, 1995 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
A homeless man tries to keep warm on a grate at 18th and Ludlow streets while reading the City Paper yesterday. The big chill is to continue with a not-so-high today of 26 degrees and a low tonight of 18.
NEWS
December 22, 1990 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL S. WIRTZ
THIS IS THE ONLY WAY to shop in the rain. Maria Christina Morellos stayed dry under a stroller cover while her mother, Maria, pushed her on North Fifth Street in Camden yesterday. The warm weather won't last. Get set for a big chill Monday.
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SPORTS
July 4, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
Maybe there isn't a secret committee in an undisclosed location running the nation's sports leagues and associations. But it sure seems that way sometimes. Maybe it's just ESPN, making sure there is never a lull in news and programming. Either way, what used to be the slow summer months of June and July somehow have been transformed into Transaction Season. The long-standing buildup to baseball's trade deadline has been turbo-boosted by the, er, coincidental scheduling of NBA and NHL draft and free-agency activity.
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Today's a big day for the collaboration that Jay-Z and Kanye West have dubbed The Throne. Tickets for their Watch the Throne tour go on sale this morning, through Comcasttix.com for the Nov. 2 show at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, and through Ticketmaster for shows elsewhere. Also, their same-named LP was slated to hit iTunes today. (Reportedly, fans should look under "Throne" instead of the hip-hop stars' individual names.) The release should hit stores later this week.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2009 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The location in Southwest Philadelphia is hardly glamorous: a former junkyard bordered by an oil refinery tank farm. But something extraordinary is happening there in these punishing recessionary times. Something is being built. The Philadelphia Regional Produce Market, a $218.5 million public-private project born of controversy - including a threat to move to New Jersey - is projected to employ 1,500 and ring up $1.6 billion in sales annually when it opens in fall 2010. Twenty-seven vendors will move there from the 50-year-old Food Distribution Center, a cramped 300,000-square-foot facility near Citizens Bank Park.
NEWS
August 12, 2009 | By MARA GOLDWYN
I'M A CHILD of children of the Woodstock Generation. I'm also now over 30 - someone who, back in the day, Abbie Hoffman (RIP) said, was among those never to be trusted. Twenty-five years after visiting the Woodstock site as an 8-year-old with my folks (an event I have no recollection of), I still feel the fatigue of the "You had to be there. " For us Gen X and Y-ers, it was never a question of whether we were On or Off the Bus. The fact is, we weren't old enough to ride one by ourselves.
NEWS
September 2, 2006 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The storm formerly known as Hurricane Ernesto rained on Leslie Reid and Emily Raab's parade big time. The soon-to-be eighth graders had a last Shore blast weekend planned in Ocean City, but, like thousands, yesterday they coped with Labor Day weekend dreams thwarted by what is now Tropical Depression Ernesto. "We were going to be sitting on the beach, shopping and tanning," said Leslie, 13, of Phillipsburg, N.J. "And looking for hot guys," added Emily, also 13. Both are headed into their final year at Lopatcong Middle School.
SPORTS
April 18, 2001 | by Paul Hagen Daily News Sports Writer
The weather was bitterly cold, with a wind-chill factor at game time of 16 degrees. The wind howled in from Lake Michigan at 28 miles an hour. The game inched along into the late afternoon, with the shadows lengthening across the Wrigley Field sod, making the conditions even more arctic. The Phillies trailed by a run going into the ninth inning. They had just two hits in 12 at-bats with runners in scoring position and already had left 11 runners on base. The Cubs had closer Jeff Fassero, who had been perfect in six save opportunities, on the mound.
NEWS
March 13, 2001
You may think that it's getting a little warmer out there, but the climate has been cooling every day for consumers since President Bush took office in January. Consider: In the beginning of March, the House approved a bill that would make it harder for people to erase credit-card and other debts through bankruptcy. Before he left office, President Clinton had vetoed this bill, concerned that it would place unfair burdens on consumers. But Congress, well-oiled by bank and credit-card dollars, and sure of approval of the bill from Bush, were ready to bring the bill back before Clinton even started shopping for office space.
NEWS
February 8, 2000
For some decades now, winter hasn't been as cold as we thought it was. And, no, global warming isn't to blame. Rather, two researchers have revived doubts about the obscure 1945 experiment that served as the basis for predicting the wind-chill factor, that cold-weather favorite of TV forecasters. The conclusion: The 55-year-old wind-chill table doesn't translate accurately when applied to the real world. Turns out that back when World War II was ending, a couple of scientists in the Antarctic filled a plastic beaker with water, hung it off a pole and timed how long it took to turn to ice. They did some calculations based on temperature and wind speed, and chango-presto, came up with the now-ubiquitous wind-chill table.
LIVING
September 26, 1999 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The film credits rolled, the darkness turned to light, and the three teenage girls who had shrieked through The Sixth Sense scurried out of the theater. Behind them, strolling to the exits, Gene and Dolores Crawford agreed that the summer blockbuster about a boy who "sees dead people" was scary indeed. But on the ultimate question posed by the world's great religions and the summer's hottest movies - is there life after death? - the Crawfords disagree. "I'd like to believe there's something after this, but I really don't think so," said Crawford, 53, a crew-cut CPA from Cinnaminson.
NEWS
March 24, 1999 | BY SEAN RILEY
No, it was not a filming of a "Dukes of Hazzard" special. Even the Duke boys had only two, maybe three Hazzard County cops in "hot pursuit. " One recent week, however, Philadelphia's finest found a way to crash five police cruisers in 20 minutes. That's right, five police cars crashed - in pursuit of what? A serial killer? A mob boss? The Unabomber? Nope, the five police cars were part of a 50- mile high-speed chase, along with seven State Police cars and a State Police helicopter in pursuit of a pickpocket through the streets of West Philadelphia, pinballing off parked cars, trees and, believe it or not, each other.
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