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Big Country

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SPORTS
March 27, 1995 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
It's been so long since Oklahoma State has been to the Final Four that there was no Final Four then. Been so long that the school in Stillwater was known as Oklahoma A & M. Been so long that OSU coach Eddie Sutton was still three years removed from becoming a student there. Back in 1951, there were just 16 teams in the NCAA Tournament. There was a regional site in the East and one in the West. Oklahoma A & M, under legendary coach Henry Iba, won two games before losing in the West Regional final.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2012 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Titus Andronicus' Patrick Stickles has no qualms about borrowing from the past. Over the course of three albums, his band, originally from Glen Rock, N.J., has combined punk-rock brio with historical, literary, and philosophical allusions. On 2010's The Monitor , Titus Andronicus conflated Civil War references and Abraham Lincoln quotations with the saga of a modern-day young adult in the middle of an existential crisis. On "In a Big City" from the album Local Business , which comes out Monday, a day before the band plays the First Unitarian Church, Stickles drops a line from Hamlet's "to be or not to be" soliloquy into a song that blatantly alludes to the '80s hit "In a Big Country.
SPORTS
April 1, 1995 | By Gwen Knapp and Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
"Big Country" wrestled with a Kingdome backboard in practice yesterday. The backboard lost. Its safety glass rained onto the court, settling onto the floor and Bryant Reeves' trademark crew cut. The backboard was replaced in about 10 minutes, minus a shot clock, and NCAA officials solemnly reported that this was, indeed, the first known backboard-busting in Final Four history. Not so for Reeves. The Oklahoma State center has shattered four in his career - one in Italy during practice with Team USA between his sophomore and junior seasons, two in home practices last season, and now the Kingdome glass.
SPORTS
April 1, 1995 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
One minute, Bryant Reeves was casually rainbowing three-pointers, something the 7-foot senior center has done only eight times in the 135 games he has played in four seasons at Oklahoma State. Then, in the blink of an eye, "Big Country" brought the house down by doing something he is familiar with - slam-dunking a basketball, in this instance, a two-handed reverse. Actually, what Reeves did was bring the backboard down - in a jillion itty- bitty pieces, all over the Kingdome floor.
SPORTS
March 23, 1995 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The toothpick twirls constantly in Randy Rutherford's mouth. "It ain't like dipping (chewing tobacco)," said the Oklahoma State shooting guard. "You take Big Country (Bryant Reeves). He might have to change his dipping every 30 minutes. That gets to be expensive. Now, these toothpicks are free. I can get as many as I like. " Rutherford had just scored 18 points, grabbed seven rebounds - as many as the 7-foot Reeves - handed out four assists and picked up four steals to send the Cowboys (25-9)
NEWS
June 19, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Everything about country superstars Faith Hill and Tim McGraw - the Soul2Soul tour - is big. The decade-long married couple's two sold-out shows at Wachovia Center: big. Their staging: big. Think a flashily lit-from-below, in-the-round thing, with arms extended for maximum outreach. Their drama: big. Like when their smoke-and-fire duets found them sprung from below the stage (the syrupy "Like We Never Loved Before") with McGraw black-leather-clad and sleeker than an otter.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
Tobias Peter is a political reporter and news editor at the Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger newspaper in Cologne, Germany; he is visiting The Inquirer as part of the International Center for Journalists' Arthur F. Burns Fellowship Program 'Born in the USA!"
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | by Richard Grayson
It may be one of the smallest states, with an area of only 7,468 square miles, but in the eyes of the media, New Jersey's size is very big indeed. Journalists just love to describe geographic locations in relation to New Jersey. Israel's size, for instance, is routinely linked to New Jersey's. In April 7, 1996, the Times-Picayune of New Orleans had this comment: "Israel isn't a big country (about the size of New Jersey), but it has a varied typography and climate. " Similarly, the Cleveland Plain Dealer ran an Op-Ed article on Jan. 7, 1997, proclaiming, "Millions upon millions of Arabs . . . surround a state of Israel the size of New Jersey.
SPORTS
August 22, 2008 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's how the Olympic tally sheet for the United States read Thursday afternoon: 27 gold medals, 83 overall medals, 140,000 new enemies. The entire populace of the tiny Caribbean island of Netherlands Antilles apparently is angry with America. They think we're tattletales who cost them their one chance for a medal at these Summer Olympics. "I didn't get any sleep," said Imro Van Wilgen, general secretary of the Netherlands Antilles Olympic Committee (NAOC), during a news conference yesterday.
NEWS
March 26, 2003 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In his new comedy, Head of State, Chris Rock plays a long-shot presidential candidate running on an angry-working-man platform. Two weeks before the film opens, the voice of the common man is holding forth in a rather luxe setting: the corner office in a Manhattan high-rise. And not just any office - the Zen-like aerie of DreamWorks SKG boss Jeffrey Katzenberg. Despite the altitude, the opinions expressed are strictly street as Rock echoes the indignation that fuels his character's campaign.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2012 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Titus Andronicus' Patrick Stickles has no qualms about borrowing from the past. Over the course of three albums, his band, originally from Glen Rock, N.J., has combined punk-rock brio with historical, literary, and philosophical allusions. On 2010's The Monitor , Titus Andronicus conflated Civil War references and Abraham Lincoln quotations with the saga of a modern-day young adult in the middle of an existential crisis. On "In a Big City" from the album Local Business , which comes out Monday, a day before the band plays the First Unitarian Church, Stickles drops a line from Hamlet's "to be or not to be" soliloquy into a song that blatantly alludes to the '80s hit "In a Big Country.
NEWS
October 14, 2012 | By Tobias Peter
When I was a 14-year-old in Germany, I had a teacher who always said, "America, that's a morally corrupt place where it's all about money and power. They don't care for the poor, but they like to spend billions of dollars on stupid wars that make the world a less safe and less human place. " This was the man who made me want to go to the United States. It was the desire for the forbidden fruit that made me feel connected with America. When I finally went to Washington to study for a semester, I stumbled across the homeless every morning on the way to my internship downtown.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
Tobias Peter is a political reporter and news editor at the Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger newspaper in Cologne, Germany; he is visiting The Inquirer as part of the International Center for Journalists' Arthur F. Burns Fellowship Program 'Born in the USA!"
SPORTS
August 29, 2012 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
GOOGLE THE nation's name and this is what you get: "Uganda Little League" lands just ahead of "Uganda Genocide," a contrast that immediately reminds you that this story of 11 well-traveled Little Leaguers is too big to get your head around, and too beautiful too. But let's give it a shot anyway. Lugazi, the Ugandan Little League team that won enough games and handed in enough forms this summer to make it to Williamsport, was at Citizens Bank Park Tuesday night, the guests of Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
They look like they could be brothers, a couple of 6-foot-4 towheads with high cheekbones and, on this afternoon, big country smiles. Hunter Pence and Jake Diekman went through a whirlwind of emotions on Tuesday afternoon. Pence drew boos for a costly error, his second defensive misadventure of this homestand, then cranked the game-winning home run in the 10th inning. The homer - which for added delight came at the expense of old pal Brett Myers - earned a victory for Diekman in the young lefthander's major-league debut.
SPORTS
August 22, 2008 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's how the Olympic tally sheet for the United States read Thursday afternoon: 27 gold medals, 83 overall medals, 140,000 new enemies. The entire populace of the tiny Caribbean island of Netherlands Antilles apparently is angry with America. They think we're tattletales who cost them their one chance for a medal at these Summer Olympics. "I didn't get any sleep," said Imro Van Wilgen, general secretary of the Netherlands Antilles Olympic Committee (NAOC), during a news conference yesterday.
NEWS
June 19, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Everything about country superstars Faith Hill and Tim McGraw - the Soul2Soul tour - is big. The decade-long married couple's two sold-out shows at Wachovia Center: big. Their staging: big. Think a flashily lit-from-below, in-the-round thing, with arms extended for maximum outreach. Their drama: big. Like when their smoke-and-fire duets found them sprung from below the stage (the syrupy "Like We Never Loved Before") with McGraw black-leather-clad and sleeker than an otter.
NEWS
March 26, 2003 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In his new comedy, Head of State, Chris Rock plays a long-shot presidential candidate running on an angry-working-man platform. Two weeks before the film opens, the voice of the common man is holding forth in a rather luxe setting: the corner office in a Manhattan high-rise. And not just any office - the Zen-like aerie of DreamWorks SKG boss Jeffrey Katzenberg. Despite the altitude, the opinions expressed are strictly street as Rock echoes the indignation that fuels his character's campaign.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | by Richard Grayson
It may be one of the smallest states, with an area of only 7,468 square miles, but in the eyes of the media, New Jersey's size is very big indeed. Journalists just love to describe geographic locations in relation to New Jersey. Israel's size, for instance, is routinely linked to New Jersey's. In April 7, 1996, the Times-Picayune of New Orleans had this comment: "Israel isn't a big country (about the size of New Jersey), but it has a varied typography and climate. " Similarly, the Cleveland Plain Dealer ran an Op-Ed article on Jan. 7, 1997, proclaiming, "Millions upon millions of Arabs . . . surround a state of Israel the size of New Jersey.
SPORTS
July 7, 1996 | By Joe Juliano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Long before he actually thought about taking a stab at the PGA tour, Joe Daley couldn't wait to get his driver's license. That way, he could play and practice whenever he wasn't caddying at Sunnybrook, Green Valley or Philadelphia Cricket. In a way, all the miles he logged years ago in the Philadelphia suburbs took him to last weekend in Hartford, Conn. There, Daley, 35, a rail-thin rookie who grew up in Plymouth Meeting, shared television time with such established stars as Tom Kite and Mark Calcavecchia.
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