CollectionsBig Fight
IN THE NEWS

Big Fight

SPORTS
September 26, 2004 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Today is Jerome McDougle's chance to get even for that whack in the head his brother Stockar once gave him. "He gets mad when I tell this story because he kind of got me good, and he regretted it," Jerome said last week as the Eagles defensive end prepared for this afternoon's game against the Detroit Lions and his older brother. "We got in a big fight over a video game, and he really punched me, and I was seeing stars. He always felt sorry about it, and he regretted it. " The McDougle brothers were fighting over football - sort of. "It was a Sega Genesis Madden game," Jerome said.
SPORTS
June 22, 2003 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At its heart, the realignment tug of war between the Big East and Atlantic Coast Conference is a high-stakes, hard-edged national political campaign. Governors are involved, along with high-priced New York attorneys and dueling public relations firms that are adept at politics. Five Big East schools have initiated a lawsuit that accuses Miami and Boston College of being behind a "deliberate scheme to destroy the Big East and abscond with the collective value of all that has been invested and created in the Big East.
SPORTS
July 1, 2002 | By Kevin Tatum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After retaining his World Boxing Organization heavyweight title Saturday by pummeling aging Ray Mercer into submission, Wladimir Klitschko made it known whom he wants next: Lennox Lewis, the World Boxing Council and International Boxing Federation champion. "From my side, I'm ready to fight," said the 6-foot-7 Klitschko, a native of Kiev, Ukraine, whose weight was listed at 243 on fight night. "Now, we have to take counsel from the guys who can do it, and bring it to life. " Saturday's nationally televised bout at the Trump Taj Mahal ended at the 1-minute, 8-second mark of the sixth round.
NEWS
June 2, 2002 | By Tom Turcol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A political unknown just three months ago, multimillionaire businessman Douglas Forrester is trying this weekend to keep his improbable campaign on course to claim the Republican U.S. Senate nomination in New Jersey. Forrester, who has spent $3.1 million of his own money on the race, is blanketing the state with another series of glossy brochures and coordinating voter-turnout plans with key party leaders who have coalesced behind his candidacy. He also was trying to withstand a final assault by his closest challenger, former Philadelphia TV anchorwoman Diane Allen, who stepped up her criticism of Forrester to jump-start her campaign before Tuesday's primary.
SPORTS
September 10, 2001 | By Bob Ford INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the wide, quiet expanse of the Eagles' locker room last evening, there were as many perspectives on the team's overtime loss in the season opener as there were metal cubicles assigned to the players. But really, for all the variety, there was only one conclusion. "We lost, man," Hugh Douglas said simply. "We didn't learn anything. " What there was to learn - that losing tends to stink - all of them were aware of before. Sometimes, a team can commit three turnovers in the first half, dig a two-touchdown hole early in the third quarter, and still win. Yesterday at Veterans Stadium - a 20-17 loss to the St. Louis Rams in overtime - was not one of those sometimes, however.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | by Dave Davies and Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writers Staff writers Erin Einhorn and Regina Medina contributed to this report
EVERYONE KNOWS Police Commissioner John Timoney as a hands-on commander. But his immersion in yesterday's chaotic Center City protests was so complete it led to hands' being laid on him. Standing in a City Hall corridor last night, a bruised and scratched Timoney told of a "knockdown, drag-out brawl" with protesters intent on overturning a car, an encounter that left Officer Ray Felder seriously injured. Timoney's partner was in fair condition early today at Hahnemann University Hospital with head trauma and a concussion, hospital spokeswoman Lauri Durkin said.
SPORTS
November 20, 1999 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It couldn't get much better for Andrew Golota, a one-time street tough from Warsaw who became a seven-time national champion, Olympic bronze medalist, and Polish hero before he moved to the United States. Now, at 31, living in Chicago, he has virtually everything - a wife, two children, a house in Old Norwood Park, two Mercedes, a boat, a motorcycle, investments, and a rejuvenated professional boxing career that could skyrocket if he wins tonight. He is fighting Michael Grant, the 30-0 young lion based in Norristown and boxing's new darling, the man to beat in the heavyweight division.
NEWS
November 9, 1998 | By Larry Fish and Peter Nicholas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Long before the champagne corks started flying last week, Philadelphia was remaking itself, piece by piece, in ways that added up to a successful quest for one of the most coveted prizes a city can win. Republican and Democratic planners looking for a venue for their conventions in 2000 looked at Philadelphia's infrastructure - its transportation system, meeting facilities and hotels, nightspots - and liked what they saw. What they might...
SPORTS
March 30, 1998 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
To paraphrase an old joke, people came here to see a fight and the NCAA Tournament broke out. Utah was well on its way to shocking mighty North Carolina in a Final Four semifinal Saturday night in San Antonio when Shannon Briggs, a 12-1 underdog, began his bout with World Boxing Council heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis as if he thought he was Valparaiso. Briggs twice staggered Lewis in the opening round, causing the British portion of a crowd of 9,173 in Atlantic City Convention Hall to feel as queasy as, say, Kansas and Arizona fans were when their top-seeded teams were prematurely ushered out of the NCAAs.
SPORTS
February 3, 1998 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Barring a draw, someone's unbeaten streak at the Blue Horizon is going to end tonight. Heavyweights Darroll Wilson and Terrence Lewis, who square off in the 10-round main event, are a combined 16-0 at the famous fight emporium on North Broad Street. Lewis (22-3-1, 16 KOs), of Mount Airy, has won all 10 of his bouts there. Wilson (20-1-2, 15 KOs), of Mays Landing, N.J., is perfect in six appearances. No wonder Philadelphia fight fans quickly snapped up all 1,200 tickets in what promoter J Russell Peltz said is one of the fastest sellouts ever at the Blue.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|