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Big Fish

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2004 | By JOE NEUMAIER New York Daily News
They're played in flashbacks by hot young things Ewan McGregor and Alison Lohman, but "Big Fish" stars Albert Finney and Jessica Lange aren't exactly chilled salmon. Lange and Finney, who have been nominated for five Academy Awards each, even share a romantic scene in a bathtub - fully clothed. But Lange decided to heat things up: "Rather than just sit at opposite ends in the water, I thought it would be more interesting if I got on top of him, to invoke the idea of a mermaid," said Lange.
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a child growing up in Baltimore, John Camper had a habit of collecting stray animals. Not homeless dogs or cats, he says, "just weird stuff," like lizards and tadpoles. His favorite pets, however, were fish. Every room in his house had a tank. Nowadays, Camper, 28, gets to play with some very big fish and one colossal tank, the New Jersey aquarium, which is set to open in March on Camden's waterfront. His official title at the aquarium is assistant curator of fishes, but it would be more appropriate to describe him as the Shark Guy. Camper, whose idea of work attire is a T-shirt, shorts and fishing rod, will oversee the care and feeding of the big sharks in the aquarium's two- story-high main tank.
NEWS
June 13, 2011
Investigators are trying to determine what killed as many as 1,000 fish in Ridley Park Lake over the weekend. The dead fish were reported Saturday evening at the Delaware County lake. Police and state agencies including the Department of Environmental Protection and the Fish and Boat Commission were at the scene. Initial water tests did not immediately point to a cause, DEP spokeswoman Deborah Fries said Sunday night. She said water samples had been sent to a lab in Harrisburg for more testing.
FOOD
July 2, 1995 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Blessed with a prime, easy-access location that includes two large parking lots, Big Fish could probably do well without trying very hard. But it's obvious that the Detroit-based, Chuck Muer chain wants its West Conshohocken link - number 20 - to do very well. Two recent review meals at the restaurant showed consummate concern with pleasing patrons. A new, lightened and brightened interior, sunny as a beach house, has replaced the no-fun decor of the previous seafood restaurant on the site.
NEWS
May 25, 2003 | By Sylvia A. Earle
This summer, 180 million Americans will travel to the seashore. Most go to relax. Many will dine on the local residents: crabs, oysters, fish, shrimp. But few are aware that the ocean is in deep trouble. Fewer still are aware that trouble for the ocean means trouble for us. A new study published in Nature magazine underscores just how bad things are. It finds that only 10 percent of previous stocks of large, predatory fish - tuna, swordfish, marlin, cod, halibut, skates and flounder - survive in the seas.
NEWS
May 16, 1986 | By KITTY CAPARELLA and KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writers (Staff writers Scott Flander, Vince Kasper and John F. Morrison contributed to this report.)
FBI agents stepped onto the deck of a 25-foot fishing boat at an expensive bayside development in Virginia Beach, Va., yesterday and an 18-month hunt was over. They put the cuffs on Dr. Lawrence William Lavin, the fast-living Philadelphia dentist who left town in November 1984 after being identified as the boss of a multimillion-dollar cocaine racket that allegedly catered to wealthy "yuppies" like himself. Agents said the 31-year-old Lavin had been living under an assumed name in waterfront elegance in a colonial-style home that neighbors said is worth about $225,000, complete with swimming pool and hot tub. He apparently bought the home in an exclusive neighborhood called Middle Plantation, on Lynnhaven Inlet, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, soon after his disappearance from Philadelphia.
SPORTS
April 8, 1990 | By Matt Golas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The scream of line stripping off the heavy-duty spinning reel broke the tranquility of the early-morning cruise. Doug Blank jumped off his transom perch, yanked the rod from its holder and passed the works to a wide-eyed tyro in the fighting chair. Something Big had inhaled the bait. Something Big wasn't happy with this new association. It took eight seconds for 250 yards of line to peel off the reel, course through the bent-over rod and disappear into the drink. Just a free meal for Something Big. "Welcome to The Hump," Steve Phillips shouted from the tuna tower of his 38-foot Hatteras.
FOOD
August 25, 1991 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
There's no getting around it - a big fish is an intimidating item. A 12- pound turkey just looks like Thanksgiving and a bunch of sandwiches, but a 12-pound bluefish looks like final exams at cooking school. Looks, however, are deceptive. Cooking a large fish is easy - if you have a large barbecue grill - and there are many rewards. The most important payoff is deliciousness. There's far less danger of dryness when you cook a large fish whole, and the slight flavor of smoke is a definite plus.
SPORTS
August 2, 1992 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They had seen schools of blues, a couple of sharks, a couple of dolphins. Five hours into the fishing trip, with noon still an hour away, they got their first hit. "Reel hard, man," the captain, Ron Rookstool, yelled from the tuna tower on this 36-foot, single-engine fishing boat. There was kill in his voice. He smelled meat. Everybody - the four paying fishermen, the captain, his mate - knew there was a big fish at the end of the line. The journey was made in search of big fish.
SPORTS
August 16, 1986 | By Ben Callaway, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nation's most successful bass anglers are having very little success with large fish in the 16th BASS Masters Classic tournament. The 41 finalists in the event, the annual "World Series" of BASS (Bass Anglers Sportsman Society), are finding lunker largemouth hard to come by. Jerry Rhyne, a seasoned tournament pro from Denver, N.C., moved into first place yesterday after being in second after Thursday's opening day. Rhyne had five fish weighing a total of 6 pounds, 14 ounces, giving him a two-day total of 12 fish weighing 16-8.
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NEWS
February 19, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Mary Ciammetti teared up in her Conshohocken living room as she showed the video of her youngest son. It's been a little more than a year since he died of alcohol poisoning, despite his Temple University roommates' frantic attempts to save him with CPR. There was Christian Ciammetti having a bath in the kitchen sink at 16 months, then wearing a suit at First Communion. In his high school football uniform, with his girlfriend, at graduation, on skis, posing with a big fish he'd reeled in. Then the music - Avicii's "Wake Me Up" - stopped, and the images played silently: A refrigerator with empty liquor bottles and a red Solo cup. An unmade bed. A hospital room, with Christian tethered to a mesh of tubes and IVs. And finally, Christian lying in a casket in a red flannel shirt, dead at 20. He had been a junior, a young man with dyslexia who shined through his major, landscape architecture.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
'I can never remember whether it snowed for six days and six nights when I was twelve or whether it snowed for twelve days and twelve nights when I was six. " So Dylan Thomas evokes a long-gone world in his gorgeous and nostalgic prose poem "A Child's Christmas in Wales. " His childhood memories of Christmases are filled with snow and scary adventures and sleeping uncles and candy cigarettes and green-eyed cats. Lantern Theater's artistic director, Charles McMahon, adapted the poem for the stage with cocreator Sebastienne Mundheim, who also directed and designed the production.
NEWS
October 27, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
In his date with the big fish, the title character in Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea muses: "Why did they make birds so delicate and fine as those sea swallows when the ocean can be so cruel?" Many a conductor has sketched the title character in Debussy's La Mer mainly as a benign beauty, and there is plenty in the score to support that. But from the opening moments of the piece Thursday night, Rafael Fr├╝hbeck de Burgos, age 80, turned the Philadelphia Orchestra's gaze to a more varied and complex interpretation.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
J.C. Chandor has only two films under his belt, but already the North Jersey-born writer/director, 39, has staked out his territory. He makes involving, experiential movies about imperiled men who rise to action when the bottom falls out. His rookie effort, Margin Call (2011), focused on Wall Street risk managers who learn that the mortgage-backed securities they sell are toxic and will bring down their firm within the next trading cycle. In his sophomore film, All Is Lost , a pleasure sailor (Robert Redford)
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrick J. Rowan Jr., 64, of Oaklyn, a longtime teacher and administrator at Paul VI Catholic High School in Haddon Township, died Friday, Nov. 23, of a blood disease at his home. Mr. Rowan was born in Gloucester City and graduated from Gloucester Catholic High School in 1966. He earned a bachelor's degree in psychology from Villanova University in 1970 and a master's degree in education from Glassboro State College in 1976. Mr. Rowan's passion was teaching psychology to high school students.
SPORTS
October 22, 2012
Kurt Coleman Safety Northmont High School Clayton, Ohio When Kurt Coleman was a sophomore at Northmont High School, varsity football coach Collin Abels told him: "Sophomores can play varsity football, but not if they act like sophomores. " Abels could see the abilities the young athlete possessed, but also recognized that he was veering off in the wrong direction. "Like a lot of kids, you could see how he was struggling," Abels says. "Not anything unlawful, just hanging out with the wrong people.
NEWS
August 18, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anglers will be casting their lines in the Delaware River on Saturday hoping to land the biggest catfish - and cash. Cabela's King Kat Tournament Trail is based starting today at the PPL Park and Boat Ramp in Chester. Registration is at Harrah's Casino. Organizers are expecting more than 50 boats to compete. About $5,000 in cash prizes will be distributed to the top 15 percent of the field. Product prizes will also be awarded and there will be giveaways to the crowd. The event is open to the public.
NEWS
August 18, 2012
Anglers will be casting their lines in the Delaware River on Saturday hoping to land the biggest catfish - and cash. Cabela's King Kat Tournament Trail is based at the PPL Park and Boat Ramp in Chester. Registration for the event, which is open to the public, is at Harrah's Casino; fishing hours are 6:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Organizers expect more than 50 boats to compete. About $5,000 in cash prizes will be distributed to the top 15 percent of the field. Product prizes will also be awarded, as well as giveaways to the crowd.
SPORTS
December 8, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
FOR THE SECOND time in 3 days, the Miami Marlins walked up to the winter meetings podium to introduce a high-priced free agent while working doggedly behind the scenes to bring more sparkling stars to baseball's newest ballpark. The Marlins, dominating the market under art dealer-owner Jeffrey Loria, increased their spending spree to $191 million in less than a week, agreeing yesterday to a 4-year, $58 million contract with lefthander Mark Buehrle just hours after finalizing a deal with All-Star shortstop Jose Reyes.
NEWS
June 13, 2011
Investigators are trying to determine what killed as many as 1,000 fish in Ridley Park Lake over the weekend. The dead fish were reported Saturday evening at the Delaware County lake. Police and state agencies including the Department of Environmental Protection and the Fish and Boat Commission were at the scene. Initial water tests did not immediately point to a cause, DEP spokeswoman Deborah Fries said Sunday night. She said water samples had been sent to a lab in Harrisburg for more testing.
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