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Big Government

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NEWS
September 26, 1991 | By Karen Auge, Special to The Inquirer
Across the Delaware River, preparations for President Bush's motorcade were clogging traffic on Route 1, while a national press contingent began descending on East Brunswick, N.J., where the President was slated to speak at a Republican fund-raising event. Meanwhile, outside the skeleton of the once-mighty USX Corp. Fairless Works steel plant, Libertarian presidential candidate Andre Marrou stood, unrecognized, on the asphalt and occasionally had to pause to let huge trucks roar by as he outlined his campaign platform.
NEWS
March 20, 1995 | BY CAL THOMAS
People I know who have been addicted to drugs tell stories that are remarkably similar to our decades-old addiction to government. At first, they feel a rush of excitement - a high - but soon they lose control and must have the drugs to give their life meaning. Ultimately, they become completely dependent. For many, attempts to end drug dependency produce physical and emotional pain. But not trying to break the habit dooms the addict to an existence that falls far short of a life's potential.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Special to The Inquirer
Big government is alive and well and living in Pennsauken. Incumbent Democrats say the people like it that way. Republicans say it's time to cut back. Under the Democrats, Pennsauken has developed a net of rules and services like no other in South Jersey: If your leave your house unpainted, township workers will paint it, then bill you. If you can't afford to pay, they may do the job for free. If you bother the neighbors too often, township authorities can jail you for six months and fine you $1,000.
NEWS
October 16, 2000 | By David S. Broder
When Al Gore and George W. Bush debated on the Wake Forest campus Wednesday night, the 2000 election emerged more clearly than ever before as a choice between a liberal and a conservative. That is good news for Bush and a problem for Gore. The Washington Post-ABC News poll released on the eve of the debate showed that by a margin of 58 percent to 32 percent, registered voters said they preferred a smaller government with fewer services to a larger government offering more services.
NEWS
November 10, 1994 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU David Hess and Nolan Walters of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
Emboldened conservatives yesterday said they had the opportunity to reverse 60 years of reliance on big government that started with Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal but that now seems out of sync with the views of a skeptical public. And, savoring their election landslide, they pledged to reduce the government's reach into the lives of the citizenry. The leaders of that revolution, incoming Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R., Kan.) and incoming House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R., Ga.)
NEWS
February 20, 2005 | By James P. Pinkerton
Less than a decade ago, President Clinton declared that "the era of big government is over. " Clinton didn't mean it, of course. But now we know that the Republicans who cheered Clinton's words of Jan. 27, 1996, didn't really mean to end big government either. Back then, Clinton was proposing a federal budget of $1.64 trillion. President Bush's proposed budget spends $2.57 trillion. And that's not counting the costs of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, running about $80 billion a year.
NEWS
April 26, 1992
Bill Clinton came by our office last week to talk about the presidential campaign. It was more a courtesy call than a formal endorsement interview, because we had emphatically endorsed him three weeks earlier in the heat of the nasty New York primary. Still, we put him through his paces and emerged more convinced than ever that he should be the choice of Pennsylvania Democrats in Tuesday's primary. Even the doubters on the Editorial Board were impressed by what they heard. The "slick Willie" of campaign lore was nowhere to be found.
NEWS
October 7, 2001 | By Dick Polman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The war on terrorism is already reshaping the political landscape, playing havoc with traditional party agendas, and forcing politicians to adopt new priorities and muzzle their old ideological instincts. A Republican president, who as a candidate had inveighed against big government and declared that "I don't believe in command and control out of Washington, D.C.," has now endorsed a massive expansion of big-government spending and big-government authority. Many party activists are displeased.
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Across the land, liberal politicians are in retreat. Some face retirement at the hands of angry voters on Tuesday. Others hide their liberalism and run to the right to avoid the anti-liberal tide. Few argue for helping the less fortunate. Liberal Democratic control of Congress is in jeopardy. The Democratic Party faces the very real possibility of losing control of the Senate, where Democrats have ruled for eight years. And they could lose working control, if not actual control, of the House after a 40-year reign.
NEWS
January 14, 2012 | By Ben Feller, ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Seeking more power to shrink the government, President Obama on Friday suggested smashing six economic agencies into one, an election-year idea intended to halt bureaucratic nightmares and force Republicans to back him on one of their own favorite issues. "The government we have is not the government we need," Obama told business owners he'd gathered at the White House. Lawmakers seemed willing to at least consider his ideas. Sounding like a manager of a disorganized company, and looking like one by pointing to slides as he spoke, Obama asked Congress to give him a kind of reorganization power no president has had since Ronald Reagan.
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NEWS
January 20, 2015
AMID THE pomp of ceremony of Tom Wolf's inauguration as governor tomorrow, we are sure to hear soothing words from all parties about the need for compromise, about moving the state forward and about bipartisanship. The challenge - again for all involved - is how to make them real and not simply an exercise in hollow rhetoric, blown away by the winds of January almost as soon as they are uttered. Most of the political experts fear that we are in for another period of paralysis, with a Democratic governor and a Republican-controlled legislature caught in a freeze-frame of conflict over nearly every important issue.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Outside the dark-blue Lincoln Continental rolling between campaign stops along New Jersey's Route 1 on a late summer afternoon in 1994, the storm was gathering. In a few weeks, the American electorate would smite big government in a Republican deluge. In the backseat of the car, the "swamp dog" was off the chain, ready to fight. "See this widening project?" Democratic Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg said as the vehicle squeezed past orange cones, flashing yellow lights, and a concrete barrier.
NEWS
May 19, 2013 | By George Will
Leaving aside the seriousness of lawlessness, and the corruption of our civic culture by the professionally pious, this last week has been amusing. There was the spectacle of advocates of an ever-larger regulatory government expressing shock about such government's large capacity for misbehavior. And, entertainingly, the answer to the question "Will Barack Obama's scandals derail his second-term agenda?" was a question: What agenda? The scandals are interlocking and overlapping in ways that drain his authority.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | BY DOYLE McMANUS
HERE ARE three things the Obama administration has done that you probably didn't know about: Ever struggle with those accordion-style rubber sleeves on nozzles at the gas station? The sleeve - technically a "vapor recovery nozzle" - was required by the Environmental Protection Agency to keep gasoline vapors from leaking into the air. But most cars and trucks now have technology that does the job better, so last year, the EPA abolished the nozzle requirement. Because each sleeve-equipped nozzle can cost as much as $300, the change will save gas stations thousands of dollars.
NEWS
January 28, 2013
The media herd is stunned to discover that President Obama is a man of the left. After 699 teleprompted presidential speeches, the commentariat was apparently still oblivious. Until Monday's inaugural address, that is. Where has everyone been these four years? The only surprise is that Obama chose his second inaugural, generally an occasion for "malice toward none" ecumenism, to unveil so uncompromising a liberal manifesto. But the substance was no surprise. After all, Obama had unveiled his transformational agenda in his very first address to Congress, four years ago. It was, I wrote at the time, "the boldest social-democratic manifesto ever issued by a U.S. president.
NEWS
September 18, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Colwyn, on the edge of Philadelphia, is a tiny place with prodigious fiscal issues, a fractious government, and a police force that has captured national notoriety. Its surreal tax rates are among the highest in the nation, five times higher than those of some wealthier communities in the region. Not a single new home has been built in the borough in at least 15 years. At a time when public money has become ever-scarcer, local-government experts say Colwyn is the kind of town that raises an overwhelming question: What is a place with only 2,500 people doing with its own government?
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Scott Holleran
For four consecutive weekends, the most popular movie in America has been one depicting a government contest in which children kill children. The Hunger Games, based on a dystopian series of young-adult novels by Suzanne Collins, recently broke the $500 million mark in worldwide box office receipts. What gets people into movie theaters is hard to tell. But the film version of The Hunger Games is appealing to more than the books' chiefly young, female fan base, drawing boys and adults as well.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neglected tropical diseases - from sleeping sickness to river blindness - got unaccustomed attention Monday when the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and a global group of drug firms and government agencies announced a new partnership to knock out 17 diseases that harm 1.4 billion people in developing countries. The hope is to eliminate five neglected diseases and control five more by 2020, and then figure out the other seven, all from the list of neglected diseases kept by the World Health Organization, a partner in Monday's announcement.
NEWS
January 14, 2012 | By Ben Feller, ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Seeking more power to shrink the government, President Obama on Friday suggested smashing six economic agencies into one, an election-year idea intended to halt bureaucratic nightmares and force Republicans to back him on one of their own favorite issues. "The government we have is not the government we need," Obama told business owners he'd gathered at the White House. Lawmakers seemed willing to at least consider his ideas. Sounding like a manager of a disorganized company, and looking like one by pointing to slides as he spoke, Obama asked Congress to give him a kind of reorganization power no president has had since Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
December 16, 2011
Televise Supreme Court sessions I think it would be an excellent idea to televise U.S. Supreme Court sessions ("A case for TV in top court," Dec. 8). Having been present at a few sessions, I can highly recommend watching them. They are interesting, enlightening, and educational. Recently, the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania began televising sessions. I don't know what the response has been, but, if we can do it in our commonwealth, I see no reason to prevent its happening nationally.
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