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Big Love

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2003 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The striking set that greets the Wilma Theater audience before Big Love even begins gives notice that the play takes place in a different world. Three very large, Dal?-esque sculptures decorate the curtainless stage: the truncated torso of a naked woman; a tilted, elongated classical column mimicking a lipstick that paints a pair of bodyless lips; and a brawny hand holding an ovoid from which sprouts a flower. A weary woman trudges onto the stage. She's wearing a bedraggled wedding dress that she immediately shucks and, oblivious to whether or not she is being observed, steps naked into a pool of water built into one of the sculptures.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2009 | By HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
YOU CAN put Tattle face-up on the dining room table today. There are no Tiger Woods stories. Our favorite Allentown actress, Amanda Seyfried ("Mamma Mia" and the upcoming "Dear John" and "Chloe"), will be leaving the HBO series "Big Love" to become a full-time movie star. "She's been exploring her movie career for a couple of years now, and we've been giving her a lot of room to do that," "Big Love" creator Will Scheffer told TV Guide. "I know having a commitment to a show for six months definitely cuts into her ability to pursue that career.
NEWS
May 8, 2006 | By DEBORAH LEAVY
CONSERVATIVES like syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer are shaking the bars of their cages, ranting that a TV show featuring a polygamous family proves that they were right all along - that if gay marriage gained acceptance, polygamy would be next. "With the sweetly titled HBO series 'Big Love,' polygamy comes out of the closet," fulminates Krauthammer. Though having one man married to three women does add a twist to this comic soap opera, the show is hardly an advertisement for this particular alternative lifestyle.
NEWS
May 8, 2006 | By MARCIANNE WATERS
I CAN'T LOOK away. I want to. In fact, I want to walk away. But, I can't. A train wreck? Open-brain surgery on the Discovery Channel? Another "Who's Your Daddy?" brawl on Jerry Springer? No, that's not it. Although "it" does involve a TV and some brawling, of a sort. It is HBO's new series "Big Love. " I guess the "big" in "Big Love" refers to the polygamous union of Bill and Barb and Nicolette and Margene. Or maybe it describes the "love" among and between the three wives.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's hard to imagine a man with four wives and 28 children craving company so badly that he takes on a mistress. But that's the premise of Brady Udall's uproarious new novel, The Lonely Polygamist (W.W. Norton, $26.95). "It seems absurd," the author says on the phone from his home in Boise, Idaho. "I got the idea when I was talking to some polygamist. He told me one of his friends was having an affair. I thought, 'Why would you have an affair if you were a polygamist?' But it's not always about sex. It can be an escape.
NEWS
March 20, 2006 | By Charles Krauthammer
And now, polygamy. With the sweetly titled HBO series Big Love, polygamy comes out of the closet. Under the headline "Polygamists, Unite!" Newsweek informs us of "polygamy activists emerging in the wake of the gay-marriage movement. " Says one evangelical Christian big lover: "Polygamy rights is the next civil-rights battle. " Polygamy used to be stereotyped as the province of secretive Mormons, primitive Africans and profligate Arabs. With Big Love, it moves to suburbia as a mere alternative lifestyle.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Syncopated thunder? A mad chorus of jackhammers? The thump and thwack of a monolithic machine? Walk the Line, James Mangold's blazing biography of American music legend Johnny Cash, begins with a mysterious, momentous sound. At first it's off in the distance, but as the camera glides across the central California landscape to the imposing stone walls of a correctional facility, the noise grows closer, louder, frenzied. And then, finally, the source is revealed: a wild assembly of inmates in Folsom Prison stomping and clapping impatiently, even menacingly, waiting for the Man in Black to come out and play them some tunes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1992 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Ry Cooder isn't known for his spiritual leanings, but he wants to make it clear that a higher power prevented his reunion with John Hiatt, Nick Lowe and Jim Keltner in the late '80s. And he's glad it did. He and the others had first assembled to accompany Hiatt on Bring the Family, the 1987 album that brought that singer-songwriter-guitarist back from alcoholism and subsequently jump-started his career. Crew members knew then that their effortless group dynamic was the genuine juice: Reviewers hailed them as a "dream band," and observed that Hiatt's songs had become more focused.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1999 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER
If you're good enough, you don't have to play your good songs, or at least your best ones. Bob Dylan can pull that off. But if you've made only two albums and neither has exactly conquered the radio, then it's probably not time to explore your deep catalog. Yet that's what Patty Griffin did Friday night at the Painted Bride. She ignored her hits ("One Big Love," "Mad Mission") and played only five cuts from her latest CD, Flaming Red (A&M). Three of her 16 songs were unreleased originals, four were covers.
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NEWS
September 18, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE SERVICES
NEW YORK - An actor who for two decades played a scheming patriarch on the daytime drama "General Hospital" has died in Los Angeles. ABC says John Ingle was 84. The series' executive producer, Frank Valenti, announced the news via Twitter, writing: "With great sadness, I share the news of John Ingle's passing. We love him and will miss him. John will always be a part of the GH family. " Ingle took over the role as the ruthless Edward Quartermaine in 1993 and made his final appearance in an episode airing last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | Ellen Gray
TRUE BLOOD. 9 p.m. Sunday, HBO.   I'd like TO SAY you can't get "True Blood" from a stone, but as HBO's vampire drama enters its fifth season Sunday, I'm pretty sure that's exactly what it is doing.   Silly doesn't even begin to describe most of what goes on in the first few episodes, which include a veiled shout-out to former New Jersey Gov. Jim McGreevey, an enormous wink involving the folk standard "Turn! Turn! Turn!" and, as always, an unruly number of subplots.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2011
SISTERHOOD, IT turns out, really is powerful. And if you're still waiting to see how HBO's "Big Love" ended, that's all I'm going to say about Sunday's series finale, "Where Men and Mountains Meet," until you've turned the page or clicked through to another story. Consider yourself warned. Sap that I am, I teared up during the final minutes of what for five seasons was easily one of television's most original dramas, a show that sounded like a bad joke when I first heard that Bill Paxton would play a suburban polygamist in a show for HBO (and that actor Tom Hanks, of all people, would be one of its producers)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2010 | By CHUCK BARNEY, Contra Costa Times
NIKITA 9 p.m. Thursday, Channel 57. Since "Nikita," the CW's killer reboot, premiered last month, all eyes have been on its fierce and gorgeous leading lady, Maggie Q. But the show's other butt-kicking female is also seizing America's attention. She's Lyndsy Fonseca, a 23-year-old Oakland, Calif., native, who launched her acting career at the tender age of 13 on the soap opera "The Young and the Restless. " Fonseca plays Alex, a troubled teen with a violent history who has been recruited by a shadowy government agency called Division.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
IN A CASE of life imitating art, TLC has taken the success of HBO's fictional "Big Love" and launched "Sister Wives," a reality show about a real polygamist and his family. The show is set in Utah. Duh! After only one episode, it's already making headlines, and not because 41-year-old ad salesman Kody Brown has four wives, 13 children and three stepchildren. No, it's because the show caught the attention of Utah law enforcement and triggered a bigamy investigation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's hard to imagine a man with four wives and 28 children craving company so badly that he takes on a mistress. But that's the premise of Brady Udall's uproarious new novel, The Lonely Polygamist (W.W. Norton, $26.95). "It seems absurd," the author says on the phone from his home in Boise, Idaho. "I got the idea when I was talking to some polygamist. He told me one of his friends was having an affair. I thought, 'Why would you have an affair if you were a polygamist?' But it's not always about sex. It can be an escape.
NEWS
April 23, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Begonias are way underrated. But how can you love what you don't even know? The garden-industrial complex dictates that you won't find wall-to-wall begonias in stores and garden centers. You have to discover them on your own at plant sales, specialty nurseries, and flower shows. Only then will you understand the reaction of Lucy Kuder of Moorestown, when she encountered a flush of begonias 20 years ago at a Boston plant sale. "I was flabbergasted," she says. What is it that so instantly captivates these "begoniacs," as some fans call themselves?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2009 | By HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
YOU CAN put Tattle face-up on the dining room table today. There are no Tiger Woods stories. Our favorite Allentown actress, Amanda Seyfried ("Mamma Mia" and the upcoming "Dear John" and "Chloe"), will be leaving the HBO series "Big Love" to become a full-time movie star. "She's been exploring her movie career for a couple of years now, and we've been giving her a lot of room to do that," "Big Love" creator Will Scheffer told TV Guide. "I know having a commitment to a show for six months definitely cuts into her ability to pursue that career.
NEWS
June 26, 2009 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
The year was 1970, I think. My best friends, Sherry and Denise, and I excitedly flipped through Soul, the monthly newsletter put out by the R&B station in the San Francisco Bay area. In our young, impressionable eyes, Soul was the equivalent of People magazine. Under the headline "Groups To Watch," there was a picture of five good-looking boys, the youngest doe-eyed and caramel-colored with cutest pug nose you'd ever want to see. The one named Michael, who stole the show every time.
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