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Big Payoff

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NEWS
March 26, 1986 | By Julia Cass, Inquirer Staff Writer
In early 1984, Barry Ginsberg got the call he'd been waiting for. "Get ready to go to London," he was told. "The trust is ready to be disbursed. " By that point, Ginsberg, a Philadelphia lawyer, and 11 friends had invested close to $2 million - "give or take a couple hundred thousand" - over three years in the Oman Ghana Trust Fund. And now, finally, it was time for the investment to pay off. Ginsberg had been awaiting this phone call anxiously - so much so that he didn't take vacations or even go to concerts for fear he'd miss the moment.
NEWS
June 28, 1990
You have to wonder why a bunch of guys in plaid shirts with chainsaws are so much more important than thousands of shipyard workers, steelworkers and auto workers. Our government certainly thinks they are. When those heavy industries went south (sometimes in more ways than one), the government acted as if it were somehow those workers' fault. Their getting paid interfered with management's right to be incompetent. At best, they were considered victims of economic circumstances beyond anyone's control or ability to help.
NEWS
August 14, 1999 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Antonio Romero Jr., a Pennsylvania State Police trooper for nearly 11 years, had been putting handcuffs on suspected drug dealers for some time now. Yesterday, Romero was the one wearing handcuffs in a federal courtroom in Philadelphia. Federal authorities say Romero, 32, of Leithgow Street near George, stole marijuana that was supposed to be taken to a state police evidence room, and resold the drug through a cousin. Romero also allegedly allowed a major Colombian cocaine dealer to escape from State Police custody last year in expectation of a big payoff.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
A doom-laden Spanish thriller about the ghostly goings-on of castoff children, The Orphanage isn't as scary as Guillermo Del Toro's similarly themed The Devil's Backbone . But Del Toro has lent his name to The Orphanage anyway, "presenting" it in the manner of Martin Scorsese or Steven Spielberg, in hopes that the Pan's Labyrinth maestro's name will lure the crowds. Directed by Juan Antonio Bayona, The Orphanage stars Belen Rueda (from The Sea Inside )
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | By JEFF GREENFIELD
As America struggles with its Great Tax Hangover, as customers are peeled off the walls of H&R Block offices in shopping malls across the land, as emergency service paramedics cart the last remaining basket cases out of regional post offices, it is time once again to offer to America an idea whose time has come: a national tax lottery. Let us look at a few, apparently disconnected, facts and see how they fit together: Item: Tens of billions of dollars a year in taxes due to the U.S. government go uncollected because it is simply too easy to cheat the government.
SPORTS
July 22, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
A LOT OF PEOPLE say they believe their children will be successful. Rory McIlroy's father put his money where his mouth is, and it reportedly paid off big. According to Andrew Cotter, a reporter who works for the BBC, McIlroy's father, Gerry, and three friends made a legal wager 10 years ago that Rory would win the British Open by the time he turned 26. Gerry and his mates, reported Cotter, collectively wagered 400 pounds. At 500-1 odds! When Rory won the Open yesterday at age 25, he dedicated the victory to his mother, Rosie, who watched him win a major in person for the first time.
NEWS
November 3, 1999 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Yesterday was Judgment Day for some important people in this city. Particularly John White Jr. By turning his back on his own party in the race for mayor, and giving his blessing to the Republican instead of the Democrat, White was gambling with his political future. And with yesterday's win by Democrat John Street - the man he spurned - White's own power and prestige in Philadelphia may have been seriously damaged. White, after losing in the Democratic primary to Street, promptly turned around and endorsed Republican Sam Katz.
NEWS
November 3, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Greg Gibson wrote the book on remodeling. Then he illustrated it with photographs of his Main Line clients' projects, from muddy-boot stage to finished addition or deck. If there is one lesson the architect figures homeowners contemplating a major "redo," as he calls a remodeling job, should follow, it's this: Start with a sound plan, preferably prepared by an architect. Rule two? Work with the remodeling team to modify that plan when dreams outrun dollars. "You learn after doing this for a while, builders will line up, they'll put their hands over their hearts and they'll say, 'This is a fair price.
NEWS
July 27, 1992 | BY ZACHARY STALBERG
You're sweet. Sure, you can be rough at times. One letter I just got described my column as "guilty drivel. " Another called us racists for using the term "eenie, meenie, miney, mo. " And in the mail too were the usual death threats from my co-workers. But when it comes to babies, you're all heart. A few weeks ago, I asked you to help Deb and me name the baby boy we're expecting in a couple weeks. Given this newspaper's long history of anything-goes, it is hard to record a first here.
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | By Charlie Frush, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Instead of playing the lottery or the slots, sporting types may wish to peel a few dollars off their bankrolls the next four days for a competition that offers a big payoff - possibly - and some exercise - definitely. The Bancroft organization's second annual hole-in-one shootout will open today at noon at the Greens on Route 130 in Delran, and if a lucky person scores an ace in the finals, the payoff will be $1 million. Holes-in-one being as improbable as they are, anyone who can grip a club probably has a chance in the contest, which costs $1 a ball and benefits Bancroft, a private, nonprofit organization for those with developmental disabilities and head injuries.
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BUSINESS
July 29, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Jeff Long could torture himself with "what ifs. " Especially: What if that financial backer had come through with the $250,000 Long needed to sustain his ticket-outsourcing business for college sports events until critical mass was achieved? But after that potential investor bailed, a fortuitous thing happened to Long, of Thornton, Delaware County. A neighbor convinced him to come watch his son play for Malvern Prep in a lacrosse playoff game against La Salle College High School.
SPORTS
July 22, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
A LOT OF PEOPLE say they believe their children will be successful. Rory McIlroy's father put his money where his mouth is, and it reportedly paid off big. According to Andrew Cotter, a reporter who works for the BBC, McIlroy's father, Gerry, and three friends made a legal wager 10 years ago that Rory would win the British Open by the time he turned 26. Gerry and his mates, reported Cotter, collectively wagered 400 pounds. At 500-1 odds! When Rory won the Open yesterday at age 25, he dedicated the victory to his mother, Rosie, who watched him win a major in person for the first time.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Internet gambling has generated a $50.3 million payoff for lawyers, lobbyists, and other professionals since mid-2009, according to disclosures posted Friday by the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement. The disclosures came just days before New Jersey publishes its first revenue report for online gambling, which started in late November and has been closely watched by gambling interests because New Jersey is the first major U.S. market to legalize online poker and casino gambling.
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - A decade ago, Jon S. Corzine was a freshman U.S. senator whose financial expertise earned him a spot on the Senate Banking Committee, where he could grill those called to testify before Congress. On Thursday, Corzine was in the uncomfortable position of sitting in the witness seat, explaining to members of the House Agriculture Committee what had happened to $1.2 billion that farmers invested in his now-bankrupt financial firm, MF Global. Corzine, 64, New Jersey's former governor, looking drawn and somber through more than two hours of questioning, had a simple yet confounding answer: I don't know.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2011
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You are skilled at the art of persuasion. You know to plant an idea in someone's head and let it take root and grow. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You'll make a startling statement to get everyone's attention. What you say is probably true, but that's beside the point. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You're on an information-gathering mission of sorts. Keep your questions unstructured and open, and people will tell you the most unusual facts. CANCER (June 22-July 22)
NEWS
April 29, 2011
If you've ever had a fantasy about chucking it all to become a farmer, here's the book for you: SPIN-Farming Basics: How to Grow Commercially on Under an Acre , by Wally Satzewich and Roxanne Christensen. It may convince you that your dream can be converted to a moneymaking business plan with a smaller investment, and on far less land than a conventional farm. SPIN stands for "small plot intensive," and it's touted by creator Satzewich, a Canadian, as a new way to farm for city or suburban folks who may have only a thousand square feet of growing space and little or no gardening, let along farming, experience.
SPORTS
April 13, 2011
WASHINGTON - The overspecialized, travel-teamed, AAU-ification of sports is our current American reality. Seeing as how the players have never been better, in everything, it is hard to argue with the results. At the same time, though, it seems almost quaint to hear Wilson Valdez tell his story. It is so different. He grew up in the Dominican Republic, in a placed called Nizao. "We were really poor," he said. "We were glad we had something to eat every day. That was the only thing that mattered, that we had something to eat. " Valdez, sitting in a major league clubhouse, talked easily about how he appreciates the contrast from then to now. He continues to fill in for Chase Utley at second base for the Phillies.
NEWS
September 24, 2010 | By CHUCK DARROW & REGINA MEDINA, darrowc@phillynews.com 215-313-3134
DEIDRE JONES may not be in the same league as legendary gamblers Arnold Rothstein and Nick "The Greek" Dandolos, but the Delaware County woman did carve out a little piece of gaming history yesterday afternoon as she appeared to be the first person ever legally dealt a hand of blackjack in Philadelphia. Jones, who bet a black, pink and lime-green $100 chip at a $25-minimum table, was one of the hundreds of people who jammed the SugarHouse Casino on the Delaware River almost five years after plans to build it were first announced.
LIVING
November 14, 2008 | By Claire Whitcomb FOR THE INQUIRER
Imagine a white room with white floors and an eye-catching mix of contemporary and antique furniture. This is Darryl Carter's world. It's a place that can be defined either as new modern or "The New Traditional," to echo the title of Carter's recent book (Clarkson Potter, $45). Either way, the spare background and the eclectic furnishings combine past and present in a way that's very of the moment. Carter is an accidental, and very successful, decorator. He started out as a lawyer but found himself sought by a different sort of client when his Washington apartment landed on the cover of Metropolitan Home magazine.
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