CollectionsBig Pharma
IN THE NEWS

Big Pharma

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 16, 2005 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Reynold Panettieri Jr. is sitting pretty, flush with drug-company money for his research on asthma at the University of Pennsylvania. Edward Garvey, on the other hand, is miffed, having lost his pharmaceutical marketing job in New Jersey because of corporate cost cutting. These are the clashing realities of the global pharmaceutical business today, with the Philadelphia region one of its hubs. Companies are gambling ever bigger sums of money on blockbuster products, with painful consequences when they falter.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
BioClinica Inc. is a bit unusual these days in the region's pharmaceutical industry. It is hiring. The company creates computer software to read and measure images, such as brain scans of tumors, and to digest the huge amounts of data related to clinical studies that drug companies sponsor. The company had 522 employees at the end of 2011 and hopes to add 55 by year's end, with most of the current job listings pegged for headquarters in Newtown, Bucks County, and its site in Audubon, Montgomery County.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Big Pharma has been shedding all sorts of assets in recent years - human as well as intellectual property. While that poses big risks for an area like Philadelphia that is home to so many large pharmaceutical companies, it can be an opportunity for new company formation. An announcement last week involving brand-name GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. and no-name AltheRx Inc. shows how. Backed by a single, unidentified private investor, AltheRx acquired solabegron, a compound that GlaxoSmithKline had been studying as a treatment for overactive bladder in women and irritable-bowel syndrome.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2005 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the spring of 1999, Osagie Imasogie had an idea for a new kind of venture-capital firm. Instead of investing cash in promising young companies, the "currency" would be the drug compounds and technologies that big pharmaceutical companies had abandoned. That intellectual property may or may not be the next Viagra or Lipitor, but it could be of great interest to a smaller biotechnology firm. A longtime pharmaceutical executive, Imasogie talked over his idea with a friend, Tachi Yamada, at SmithKline Beecham, where Imasogie had formerly worked.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2005 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's the 900-pound gorilla of all science fairs, a giant four-day schmoozefest for the biotechnology industry, and a Who's Who of pharmaceutical and biotech luminaries from around the country and world. The Biotechnology Industry Organization's annual convention is coming to Philadelphia in June, bringing with it 18,000 people. During the four-day conference, which opens June 19, delegates will ponder the fate of embryonic stem cell research, drug safety and the FDA's role, and whether protein-based biotech drugs can be safe and effective if made by lower-cost generic-drug makers.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2008 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For decades, investors turned to big pharmaceutical companies to ease the pain of a tumultuous stock market. Shares in Merck & Co. Inc., GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. and Wyeth buffered any body blows the Dow Jones industrial average delivered. Those days are long gone. In recent years, Big Pharma - usually defined as the multinational companies with sprawling tentacles in drug research, development, manufacturing and marketing, as opposed to smaller firms usually concentrated on research - has been staring down $115 billion worth of drug-patent expirations.
NEWS
June 20, 2005 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For big drug companies in Philadelphia and around the world scrambling for profitable new products, biotechnology may look like a savior. But there are many routes to salvation. As the biotech industry convenes in Philadelphia this week, the hot topic may not be science but finance. At stake may be Big Pharma's domination of the business. "How are we going to take full advantage of biotechs, and how are they going to take full advantage of us?" asked Tadataka Yamada, the Upper Merion-based research chief of GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.
NEWS
November 24, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a key element missing from the ads, the trailers, and most of the hype and hoo-ha for Love & Other Drugs , and I feel duty-bound to point it out: early-onset Parkinson's disease. At the heart of this raunchy romantic comedy set in the mid-'90s, with Jake Gyllenhaal as a Big Pharma salesman hawking the wonder drug Viagra to a happy, horny throng, is a Love Story -like bummer. Anne Hathaway's character, a photographer, a barista, a woman who wants sex without attachment, is in the first stages of the degenerative disorder.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scientists and other research workers at GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.'s King of Prussia and Collegeville facilities are getting their pink slips this week. The British drugmaker, which has a U.S. headquarters in Philadelphia, is cutting 2 percent of its 17,000 global research-and-development employees, or about 350, with about half of them from this region and from the other U.S. headquarters in Research Triangle Park, N.C., spokeswoman Melinda Stubbee said yesterday. The rest of the cuts will come from facilities in the United Kingdom and Italy.
NEWS
June 11, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scientists and other research workers at GlaxoSmithKline PLC's King of Prussia and Collegeville facilities are getting their pink slips this week. The British drugmaker, which has a U.S. headquarters in Philadelphia, is cutting 2 percent of its 17,000 global research and development employees, or about 350, with about half of them in this region and at the other U.S. headquarters in Research Triangle Park, N.C., spokeswoman Melinda Stubbee said....
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 9, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
For 50 years, the University City Science Center has been where scientists and start-ups have toiled to build the next generation of Philadelphia-area companies. But to hear science center president and CEO Stephen S. Tang , what would really help nurture that entrepreneurial soup would be if a big life-sciences company were to put its headquarters or research operations in West Philadelphia. Given that several of the biggest drug companies locally have already made long-term commitments elsewhere, there is nothing on the horizon presently.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
A Philadelphia foot doctor was named one of a few dozen physicians across the nation who have earned more than $200,000 in lucrative parttime speaking and consulting work for drug companies. Dr. Warren S. Joseph, of Huntingdon Valley, was No. 5 on ProPublica's list of "Top Earners," one of a handful of doctors who grossed more than $500,000 from the pharmaceutical giants. ProPublica is a nonprofit news organization devoted to investigative journalism . The list of doctors is the latest in their series, Dollars for Docs . Joseph practices podiatry at Roxborough Memorial Hospital.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2012 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pfizer is intent on shedding noncore businesses. AstraZeneca is intent on adding any small company that might bring revenue. Such were underlying motivations for billion-dollar deals announced Monday by the two pharmaceutical giants, both of which have operations in the Philadelphia region. Pfizer Inc. sold its infant nutrition division to Nestle SA for $11.85 billion while AstraZeneca P.L.C. spent $1.26 billion to buy San Diego-based Ardea Biosciences Inc., which has a promising, but not-yet-ready, medicine for gout.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neglected tropical diseases - from sleeping sickness to river blindness - got unaccustomed attention Monday when the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and a global group of drug firms and government agencies announced a new partnership to knock out 17 diseases that harm 1.4 billion people in developing countries. The hope is to eliminate five neglected diseases and control five more by 2020, and then figure out the other seven, all from the list of neglected diseases kept by the World Health Organization, a partner in Monday's announcement.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
BioClinica Inc. is a bit unusual these days in the region's pharmaceutical industry. It is hiring. The company creates computer software to read and measure images, such as brain scans of tumors, and to digest the huge amounts of data related to clinical studies that drug companies sponsor. The company had 522 employees at the end of 2011 and hopes to add 55 by year's end, with most of the current job listings pegged for headquarters in Newtown, Bucks County, and its site in Audubon, Montgomery County.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Big Pharma cuts jobs, will a rising generation of smaller drug companies fill the holes in corporate Philadelphia? "Downsizing" has left "a highly skilled workforce" looking for management, capital, and new opportunities, said John Gattuso , Philadelphia regional director for business landlord Liberty Property Trust . Four-year-old Iroko Pharmaceuticals L.L.C. is among the firms that has been growing, not cutting. Founded by ex- GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe the 15 women chatting over coffee at the Wegmans supermarket cafe in Malvern should start their own pharmaceutical firm. They have the brain power, if not the capital. A scientist who spent 19 years in drug development sat a few tables away from a coordinator of clinical trials. A few managed pharmaceutical finances, and one administered a $2.7 billion global research and development budget. One handled drug pricing and another edited marketing materials. The former human resources person squeezed in next to the woman who once worked in supply logistics.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
If the United States is going to "win the future," what role should the government play in supporting research and development? That was the topic of a speech by Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke on Monday at a conference about jobs and economic growth at Georgetown University . While every word uttered by Bernanke right now is being scrutinized for hints of when the central bank may begin tightening monetary policy, this...
BUSINESS
April 1, 2011
The good news is that some pharmaceutical companies now disclose payments they make to doctors for speaking engagements or consulting and to researchers, hospitals, and other medical institutions for clinical studies. The bad news is that each company discloses the information differently. That will change as part of the overhaul of the nation's health insurance system, but we won't see the results of that until 2013. For now, we'll need to make do with nonstandard disclosures, such as those released by GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Big Pharma has been shedding all sorts of assets in recent years - human as well as intellectual property. While that poses big risks for an area like Philadelphia that is home to so many large pharmaceutical companies, it can be an opportunity for new company formation. An announcement last week involving brand-name GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. and no-name AltheRx Inc. shows how. Backed by a single, unidentified private investor, AltheRx acquired solabegron, a compound that GlaxoSmithKline had been studying as a treatment for overactive bladder in women and irritable-bowel syndrome.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|