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SPORTS
June 15, 2003 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Players such as Nick Price, Vijay Singh and Mark O'Meara, major champions all, will have experience to draw on as they pursue Jim Furyk in today's final round of the U.S. Open. Then there's Stephen Leaney, whose experience consists of, uh . . . just what, exactly? In his 11 years as a pro, probably the most pressure Leaney has had to withstand came during his three wins on the PGA European Tour. Or maybe it occurred in his attempts in the PGA Tour qualifying tournament, where he has missed getting his tour card by a single shot three times.
NEWS
October 7, 1988 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
On a Wednesday evening in September, Kay Boris of St. Clair, Pa., settled on her afghan-covered sofa to watch Win, Lose or Draw, her favorite television game show. During a commercial break, she started to call to her husband, who was doing the dishes in the kitchen. She never completed her sentence. Instead, she stared at the set as she heard her son James' name announced as the winner of a new $35,000 modular home. "I never, ever expected to win a house," she said. "I entered the contest hoping to win awnings for my house.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1991 | By Alissa Wolf, Special to The Inquirer
We all enjoyed playing with them in the bathtub as kids. (Some of us still do.) But this Sunday, a lot of people will get serious about rubber duckies. The Main Line and Philadelphia Jaycees are hoping that these ducks, participants in the first annual Greater Philadelphia Lucky Duck Race, will raise lots of money for Children's Choice, a private foster care agency. The fund-raising concept works like this: For $5 you rent a duck, or, rather, become its "foster parent.
NEWS
November 3, 1990 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Mario Lemieux's hockey stick, Dick Groat's baseball bat, footballs autographed by the Pittsburgh Steelers, and assorted caps, pennants and other sports paraphernalia. Sports fans would call them collectibles. Republican gubernatorial candidate Barbara Hafer would call them cash. Hafer might be far behind Gov. Casey in the money-raising department, but that doesn't mean she's given up asking for a buck. At a $50-a-head fund-raising event here recently, Hafer supporters auctioned off a bunch of sports-related items.
SPORTS
August 24, 1986 | By Alex Rosen, Special to The Inquirer
The fall and winter bowling season is about to roll around, and with it comes an assortment of questions for lane managers concerning schedules, equipment and how to form teams. Before the deluge arrives, though, some managers, such as Nick Francis Jr. of the Ridley Bowl, make sure to take time to forge through any mail that has piled up on their desks. Some of those letters will contain information concerning tournaments, which are an important phase of the sport. "Here's one that looks interesting," Francis said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1990 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Miracle on 34th Street makes a cameo appearance in the new John Hughes movie, Home Alone. So does that other heart-tugging chestnut, It's a Wonderful Life. The quick glimpses of these two yuletide classics - Kriss Kringle's cheery mug flickers on a TV set in one scene, Jimmy Stewart's impassioned yammerings are dubbed in French in another - are no accident. The prolific Hughes, who wrote and produced Home Alone, and his protege Chris Columbus, who directed, are aiming for a classic of their own. That's right, from the guys who brought you Uncle Buck and Adventures in Babysitting comes a sort of prepubescent Frank Capra's National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, a screwball farce spiked with feel-good symbology: the church, the family, the home.
SPORTS
June 11, 2010
For a poker player, there's no surer way to lose a pile of chips than to hold terrific cards that turn out to be second-best. It's known as the dreaded bad beat , and every card player can regale you with a bad-beat story or two, or a dozen. However, there are rare exceptions when a bad-beat jackpot turns the misery of being second-best into the score of a lifetime. Such special bonuses reward the loser in a showdown of great hands. On Sunday, an 84-year old King of Prussia man pocketed a little more than $336,000 when his four sevens were bested by an opponent's quad aces at the Trump Taj Mahal in Atlantic City.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | By Amy Zurzola, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Nobody waved a checkered flag or yelled, "Gentlemen, start your engines," but the competition was fierce at this Grand Prix. Mark Hart and David Dinn watched as their dream machines, fresh off the assembly line, roared out of the starting gate. Axle to axle, they rolled on until Mark's nifty blue flatbed with green accents - nicknamed Chainsaw - nudged ahead. With the crowd cheering Mark wildly as he was declared the victor, his mother stepped forward with a congratulatory peck on the cheek.
NEWS
June 6, 2005 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The Knights of the Very Very Round Table, who have proved that there is more to be had from jesting than jousting, took the big prize as best musical at last night's Tony Awards. But the blockbuster spoof of Arthurian legend and just about everything else had to share the wealth with rival shows. While Spamalot speared the coveted big prize and brought awards to its director, Mike Nichols, and Sara Ramirez, who plays the Lady of the Lake, it had to share the stage with The Light in the Piazza.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2009 | By HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
PHILADELPHIA-raised filmmaker Lee Daniels, whose last film, "Shadowboxer," got slammed by critics, won a big prize at the Sundance Film Festival. "Push," his story of a young woman finding her way out of her nightmarish circumstances in 1980s Harlem, was chosen as best U.S. drama at the nation's top indie fest. At Saturday night's ceremony, presenter Joseph Gordon-Levitt, wearing a red Barack Obama T-shirt, cheered and gave Daniels a hug before presenting the audience award to his film, which stars Mo'Nique, Mariah Carey and Paula Patton, alongside newcomer Gabourey Sidibe.
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NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
DON'T THINK OF it as a telecast. The Oscars are never just a telecast. Think of it as a fashion show, a stand-up set and a concert, with a healthy dose of Hollywood pomposity coating the entire proceedings. I don't take the Academy Awards all that seriously. But I love them anyway. It's cliche to call the Oscars the Super Bowl for the pop culture-obsessed set, but I watch the December movies and follow smaller awards shows as if they are the playoffs, setting up for the big game that will occur this Sunday on ABC. My Oscars day starts several hours before the show begins and involves a lot of alcohol.
SPORTS
November 27, 2012
WITH THE Eagles at 3-7 heading into Monday night's game against Carolina, the Sixers deep-sixed by the indefinite loss of their franchise big man, and the Flyers' season nonexistent, the closest thing we have to a pro sport these days is the discussion about who the next Eagles head coach should be. Should he be an up-and-comer or a retread? Should he come from college or the pros? And the one that gets the most play: Should he be from the defensive side of the ball or the offensive side?
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Mitt Romney faced the usual nagging questions Wednesday: Why does he have a hard time connecting with very conservative and working-class voters in the Republican presidential race? What will it take for him to shut down relatively weak opposition? Yet even as pundits asked those questions, and Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich vowed to fight on after Super Tuesday, the harsh math of delegate allocation suggested that Romney's rivals have little hope of overcoming his huge lead in the currency of the GOP nomination: voting delegates to the national convention in Tampa, Fla. Romney's campaign argued that he had taken a big step toward an inevitable claim on the nomination after winning six of the 10 states that voted on Super Tuesday - including a come-from-behind victory in the big prize of Ohio - and capturing the majority of the delegates at stake.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
Mitt Romney faced the usual nagging questions Wednesday: Why does he have a hard time connecting with very conservative and working-class voters in the Republican presidential race? What will it take for him to shut down relatively weak opposition? Yet even as pundits asked those questions, and Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich vowed to fight on after Super Tuesday, the harsh math of delegate allocation suggested that Romney's rivals have little hope of overcoming his huge lead in the currency of the GOP nomination: voting delegates to the national convention in Tampa, Fla. Romney's campaign argued that he had taken a big step toward an inevitable claim on the nomination after winning six of the 10 states that voted on Super Tuesday - including a come-from-behind victory in the big prize of Ohio - and capturing the majority of the delegates at stake.
SPORTS
July 9, 2010 | By Bill Ordine, For The Inquirer
LAS VEGAS - Recession? What recession? Apparently not in the poker world. Unemployment remains high, and the fragile stock market seesaws unpredictably, but at the World Series of Poker going on here, the clock has been turned back to the go-go days of free-flowing cash. There were 7,319 entrants in this year's WSOP Main Event, the No-limit Hold 'em World Championship that costs $10,000 to enter and began Monday. That participation is the second-largest ever behind the record set in 2006 at 8,773.
SPORTS
June 11, 2010
For a poker player, there's no surer way to lose a pile of chips than to hold terrific cards that turn out to be second-best. It's known as the dreaded bad beat , and every card player can regale you with a bad-beat story or two, or a dozen. However, there are rare exceptions when a bad-beat jackpot turns the misery of being second-best into the score of a lifetime. Such special bonuses reward the loser in a showdown of great hands. On Sunday, an 84-year old King of Prussia man pocketed a little more than $336,000 when his four sevens were bested by an opponent's quad aces at the Trump Taj Mahal in Atlantic City.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2009 | By HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
PHILADELPHIA-raised filmmaker Lee Daniels, whose last film, "Shadowboxer," got slammed by critics, won a big prize at the Sundance Film Festival. "Push," his story of a young woman finding her way out of her nightmarish circumstances in 1980s Harlem, was chosen as best U.S. drama at the nation's top indie fest. At Saturday night's ceremony, presenter Joseph Gordon-Levitt, wearing a red Barack Obama T-shirt, cheered and gave Daniels a hug before presenting the audience award to his film, which stars Mo'Nique, Mariah Carey and Paula Patton, alongside newcomer Gabourey Sidibe.
LIVING
September 10, 2008 | By Natalie Pompilio FOR THE INQUIRER
The Philly Cheesestakers' meeting started with a roll call. But instead of names, it featured wins. Two Crate & Barrel gift cards. Four tickets to a Phillies game. Boxes of chocolates from Dove. A pair of underwear from Hanes' "Wedge Free Wednesday. " Melanie Liller - who six years ago founded this group devoted to entering sweepstakes - went last. Her wins? Six packs of Sun Chips, a $5 Starbucks gift certificate - and a $4,000 grand prize from Twizzlers that included a TV, Wii and a new sofa.
NEWS
July 2, 2008 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"WIN UP TO $1,000,000! WIN UP TO 25 TIMES!" proclaims Jack of Spades, a $10 scratch-off ticket sold in New Jersey. Problem is: The $5,000 second prize is the biggest payout left. Here's a good bet: Many instant-lottery players across the country don't realize they have no chance to win the top prize for some games. Because it's already gone. But some states, such as New Jersey, keep selling such tickets - even though critics, plaintiffs, and even other state lotteries, such as Pennsylvania's, oppose the practice as unfair to consumers.
NEWS
June 11, 2008 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once again, Pennsylvania finds itself in the crosshairs of presidential politics, marked as a target on Republican and Democratic maps. Both parties' presumptive nominees are visiting the state this week, in what amount to the opening days of the general-election campaign. Arizona Sen. John McCain, the GOP candidate, plans a town-hall meeting this morning at the National Constitution Center. Illinois Sen. Barack Obama, fresh from clinching the Democratic nomination, is scheduled to hold a fund-raiser Friday evening at Sheraton Philadelphia City Center Hotel.
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