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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1995 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The City Rhythm Orchestra will play just about any type of music. Classic rock, Motown - it all depends on the gig. But what this group does best, what it was really formed to play, is big-band jazz. City Rhythm, which has a regular job Friday and Sunday nights at Frederick's on Front Street, was established in 1985 by saxophonists Pete Spina and Nick Vallerio, who had performed for several years in an assortment of other bands. "Nick and I both have always enjoyed the big-band sound," Spina said this week.
NEWS
June 16, 1993 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Is there such a thing as sound that's "too good" for most people's ears . . . or senses? While many filmgoers taking in "Jurassic Park" have proclaimed it the most exciting sensory experience since the San Francisco earthquake, others have found the film's ultra-dynamic sound treatment too much to bear. "The rumbling noises of the dinosaurs is deafening and the dialogue so quiet you sometimes can't hear what they're saying," complained one spectator who saw the film from the rear of a theater featuring the six-channel Digital Theater Sound system, newly installed just for this film.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2001 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
Besides being a junior - his father is jazz and Latin saxophonist Louis Vega Sr. - there's nothing little about "Little Louie" Vega. He's a man of big ambitions, big collaborations, and a big sound. Out of the boogie-down Bronx, Vega has jazzed up the 4/4 thump of house with Latin and Afro rhythms, a sound that has possessed the salsa-inept to try to twist those hips with Latin flair. And tonight he spins the hypnotic sound at Fluid. Whether alone or as half of the duo Masters at Work - his partner is Kenny "Dope" Gonzalez - Vega has produced projects that demand notice.
NEWS
December 6, 1994 | BY VANESSA HABERSHAW
Food and music have often been used to transcend the diversities between races and cultures. This winning combination was put to full force when members of the Philadelphia Orchestra were invited to our school to share Philly Fare (hoagies, soft pretzels and Tastykakes) and their experiences as budding musicians during their public school days. The recent cuts and restoration of music teacher positions made me pause and review how important the music program at my high school was for me. The first time I heard the Philadelphia Orchestra was courtesy of the free tickets given to local high schools for the Friday afternoon performances (this practice still exists)
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The wonder of Vivaldi and Telemann is not that they wrote so much but that their music ranged so widely with such limited means. It was that range that formed the basis for Philomel's weekend programs in which flutes and bassoon joined the ensemble of early stringed instruments. Guest flutist Shelley Gruskin joined ensemble leader Elissa Berardi in Concertos for two flutes and varied ensembles. They demonstrated that the performers play a role in the distinctions and shadings that the music develops.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1999 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
To the surprisingly young crowd that filled the Tower Theater Monday night for the first of two sold-out shows, you'd think the Indigo Girls would be an anomaly. The duo - the saltier, Patti Smith-lite Amy Ray and the softer, gentler Emily Saliers - weave an intricate pattern of acoustic and electric sounds, and speak of adult themes. So it seems odd that they drew such an audience in a marketplace devoted to hip-hop, thrash funk and dance pop. But in raffish live performance, the Indigos' varied points of conflict are boiled down to a predominant theme: freedom and self-reliance at any cost.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
If you combed through the piano recital programs of the coming year and put the most forbidding pieces into one concert, you'd have Ieva Jokubaviciute's recital Thursday at Settlement Music School. In the program, titled " New Century, New Paths" and presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, this fully matured Lithuanian pianist skillfully guided one's ears through Debussy, Schoenberg, Scriabin, Janacek, and Berg in performances that confidently created a trajectory from which all the composers benefited.
NEWS
September 10, 2002 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Despite their juicy, emotive songs, it's uncertain what modern soul's finest singers - Gerald Levert, Angie Stone and Luther Vandross - have to do with hamburger-dom. Burger King's sold-out BK Got Music show at the First Union Center on Sunday was delicious. But it was hotter and more satisfying, sonically and spiritually, than a sackful of char-broiled anything - no preservatives or fat, despite the fact that three of its participants made proud reference to being horizontally challenged.
NEWS
October 19, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
The first time the duo called Cults came through town, for their eponymous 2011 debut, Madeline Follin and Brian Oblivion talked up the influences that made up their fuzztoned, girl-groupy death-pop. Just about to start a tour that would take up most of the next two years, the duo spoke of Lesley Gore and My Bloody Valentine. Now we have Static, their sophomore effort. It's bolder, scratchier (hence the title), and touched by the cinematic sweep of blaxploitation sound tracks and deep, throbbing rhythms.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was late last summer when Larry Kirwan first thought about bringing the saga of Black 47 to a close. "We were coming back from a gig in Buffalo, and I remember thinking, 'Wow, the band sounded really good,' " the frontman for the Celtic-rock sextet said from his home in New York. "And I thought, 'This would be a good time to call it a day - go out when you're sounding really good rather than for other reasons.' . . . Everyone in the band was down with it. It feels like a great time" to finish.
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NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
If you're going to have a big arena-rock sound at this point in pop music's history, and you're not actually on an arena-size stage, you'd better have a way to sound big. The four brothers from South Africa who make up Kongos had to do that several ways at Electric Factory on Thursday night. First, these smooth-singing sons of South African vocalist-songwriter John Kongos - guitarist Daniel, bassist Dylan, drummer Jesse, and keyboardist and accordionist Johnny - had brotherhood. Their rich, high harmonies, on the pugnacious "I'm Only Joking" surely came from years spent sharing bedrooms and bathrooms, to say nothing of studios and stages.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was late last summer when Larry Kirwan first thought about bringing the saga of Black 47 to a close. "We were coming back from a gig in Buffalo, and I remember thinking, 'Wow, the band sounded really good,' " the frontman for the Celtic-rock sextet said from his home in New York. "And I thought, 'This would be a good time to call it a day - go out when you're sounding really good rather than for other reasons.' . . . Everyone in the band was down with it. It feels like a great time" to finish.
NEWS
October 19, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
The first time the duo called Cults came through town, for their eponymous 2011 debut, Madeline Follin and Brian Oblivion talked up the influences that made up their fuzztoned, girl-groupy death-pop. Just about to start a tour that would take up most of the next two years, the duo spoke of Lesley Gore and My Bloody Valentine. Now we have Static, their sophomore effort. It's bolder, scratchier (hence the title), and touched by the cinematic sweep of blaxploitation sound tracks and deep, throbbing rhythms.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
If you combed through the piano recital programs of the coming year and put the most forbidding pieces into one concert, you'd have Ieva Jokubaviciute's recital Thursday at Settlement Music School. In the program, titled " New Century, New Paths" and presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, this fully matured Lithuanian pianist skillfully guided one's ears through Debussy, Schoenberg, Scriabin, Janacek, and Berg in performances that confidently created a trajectory from which all the composers benefited.
NEWS
September 25, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Since Joni Mitchell is the archetypal female singer-songwriter and a restless musical adventurer, her influence knows no bounds. You might not hear the author of "You Turn Me On I'm a Radio" on the radio all that much, but her impact on everyone from Sarah McLachlan to Feist to Led Zeppelin (which is said to have written "Goin' to California" about her), has been enormous. That much is apparent of late, starting with A Tribute to Joni Mitchell, which came out in the spring and was highlighted by Prince's shimmering "A Case of You. " Two other projects with Mitchell's name on them arrive today.
NEWS
January 29, 2007 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
A good big band is a wonderful thing to hear. A good arranger writes charts that magnify each section's and each musician's strengths and diminishes their weaknesses. More often than not, the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra, based at the New York club with that name, fits that description. It played two sets at the Art Museum on Friday night, and the orchestra provided the packed foyer a glimpse into a style too seldom heard in today's music. The group, one of the few consistently working big bands in today's jazz, is the direct descendant ? the ghost band, really ? of the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra, which rolled on from 1965 till 1990, when drummer Lewis died.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Syncopated thunder? A mad chorus of jackhammers? The thump and thwack of a monolithic machine? Walk the Line, James Mangold's blazing biography of American music legend Johnny Cash, begins with a mysterious, momentous sound. At first it's off in the distance, but as the camera glides across the central California landscape to the imposing stone walls of a correctional facility, the noise grows closer, louder, frenzied. And then, finally, the source is revealed: a wild assembly of inmates in Folsom Prison stomping and clapping impatiently, even menacingly, waiting for the Man in Black to come out and play them some tunes.
NEWS
September 6, 2005 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
I can barely stand to watch any more of the nightmare that has descended upon my old home in New Orleans. But like the friends who now e-mail me from their diaspora in Houston, Memphis and Maringouin, La., I cannot pull my eyes away from the television and streaming video and pictures on the Internet. It isn't the spectacle of apocalypse that draws me. My eyes keep straining to spot a glimmer beneath the floodwaters and heavy fire clouds of some remnant of the beautiful Crescent City as I last left it. I try to conjure up the smell of sweet olive trees and jasmine blooming outside my door in Riverbend.
NEWS
March 7, 2005 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
After 24 years as silly ambassadors of hair rawk and home video sex-capades, M?tley Cr?e deserves respect. As the cornstarch in the roux of debauched '80s metal, the Cr?e added thickness to a genre about to go pop while providing the necessary sweeteners to push it there. Yet, by decade's end, M?tley's calling cards - excess, power ballads, Lycra tights - had been revoked. Fans of the sweet, the sour and the spandex - themselves in a land-of-the-lost where teased hair-don'ts rule - sold out the Spectrum Friday night.
NEWS
January 10, 2005 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Something was amiss at the Troc Friday for Was (Not Was), the newly reformed kitchen-sink art-funkers renowned for biting, sarcastic lyrics. There were no people, no noise. Instead, Detroit's fusion of Steely Dan to Sun Ra was relegated to the upstairs Balcony due to poor sales. Rather than be down, a tightly packed older crowd and the elders of bizarre R&B connected for a thrill ride of free-associative disco-jazz. Led by faux bros David Was (Weiss, lyricist/flutist)
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