CollectionsBig Time
IN THE NEWS

Big Time

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 25, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MYRNA LUDWIG
Remember when the circus came to town? It was only days ago. The Clyde Beatty-Cole Brothers Circus, with lion tamers and tall clowns, appeared at Crestmont Park in Willow Grove Wednesday through Friday.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | DAVID MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
Class No. 323 graduated from the Police Academy at the Mann Music Center yesterday morning. Among the 95 graduates was Officer Gary Capuano (above), who looks towards crowd gathered for the ceremony. Another new grad, Officer Joseph P. Murphy (left), poses with sons Joey, 7, and Joshua, 4.
NEWS
July 8, 1988 | By RICK SELVIN, Daily News Staff Writer
Camden's exciting new Showplace at 1300 Admiral Wilson Blvd. has been bringing big names to the area for a couple of months already. Now it's expanding on its "big" policy, with some giant men and women in another field - wrestling. Talk about huge: How about 7-foot-7 Silo Sam? And D.C. "Mad Dog" Drake, a brute of a guy who's also the Camden-based National Wrestling Federation champ. The big event this week - possibly the kickoff to a monthly series of battles at the new venue - is a Tuesday night mega-card that will be taped for international TV release (NWF matches already are televised in Pittsburgh, Phoenix, Chicago, L.A. and the Baltimore-Washington area)
SPORTS
November 28, 1997 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
When the players arrive in the visiting hockey locker room, probably as big as some gyms they have played in, coach George White says: "This has carpeting. That's the only difference from ours. " The Ursinus team came to the CoreStates Center Wednesday afternoon to play a basketball game with Catholic University. Mostly, it came for the experience. White, the fourth-year coach who graduated from Holy Ghost Prep and then, in 1983, from Harvard, invited the Daily News to share the day. White played in the Palestra and Boston Garden.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1988 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
How do you know when you've hit the big time? For the various incarnations of Tom Waits, the clues come in dribs and drabs. The first Waits to appear in the concert film Big Time is a drifter working as a ticket-taker and an usher in the theater. For him, the big time means just breathing the air of show business. Marked by a pencil-thin mustache and a collection of watches for sale on his right arm, he drifts off while pitching cards into a top hat or sitting behind the booth, and his hallucinations of song-stylist stardom bring us to another Waits - the gravel-voiced band leader.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2000 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Vaudeville faded from the nation's stages about 70 years ago, a victim of the new media of movies and television. Watching The Big Time: Vaudeville For The Holidays at the Adrienne, you wonder why something as much fun as vaudeville should have disappeared. This collection of original vaudeville comedy and music, fielded by 1812 Productions, is terrific entertainment. Conceived and directed by Jen Childs, 1812's co-artistic director, it's a smartly put together, exuberantly performed tribute to the vanished form.
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | By Ed Finkel, Special to The Inquirer
They are sales managers, financial consultants, doctors, lawyers and graduate students. They only moonlight as professional athletes. Players on the Philadelphia Wings indoor lacrosse team, it's safe to say, have much more in common with ordinary people than with high-salaried baseball, football and basketball stars. Like actors, comedians or rock-and-rollers that have yet to hit the big time, they hold day jobs to get by and generally aren't recognized on the street. But as they step onto the field at 2 p.m. Sunday for their third contest of the 1990 season - after winning their first two games last month in defense of the Major Indoor Lacrosse League title - the Wings, like struggling musicians, actors or comics, are hopeful of better days to come.
SPORTS
July 14, 1991 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 76ers yesterday opened their rookie and free-agent camp, the annual showcase for dream-seekers and young men almost good enough to play in the NBA. There was the usual complement of that sort - rookies not drafted and players who have toiled a season or two in the bush leagues of professional basketball. But the attention at this camp is rigidly fixed on three men who have been in the NBA and are trying to make their way back. Their paths have been blocked for a variety of reasons, but each looks to the 1991-92 season and envisions spending it in a Philadelphia 76ers uniform.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Diddy to open a school Sean "Diddy" Combs doesn't seem to do anything in half-measures. When the Harlem-born hip-hop artist-producer and entrepreneur decided to give something back to his hometown, he wasn't talking about distributing a dozen free sneakers or donating a couple of computers to the local school. No, Diddy is donating an entire school. Diddy, 46, has announced that this fall, he will open the Capital Preparatory Harlem Charter School. Set to serve grades 6 and 7 in its first year, the school will expand a grade a year until it's a 6-12 school.
SPORTS
March 22, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
With 30 seconds to go and Villanova's second-round hurdle in the NCAA tournament successfully cleared on Sunday, senior guard Ryan Arcidiacono walked off the Barclays Center court to the bench and was caught in an extended hug by his coach, Jay Wright, who thumped him on the back several times. "I just told him, 'This is your team. You're why we're here,' " Wright said. "He's one of the best. I think you can really say he's one of the best of all time. " Arcidiacono played his usual quietly spectacular game in the Wildcats' 87-68 victory over Iowa, a win that carried them into the Sweet 16 for the first time since their Final Four team of 2009 did it. Sunday's performance also ended a run of three straight crashes in the second round as a No. 1 or No. 2 seed in 2010, 2014 and 2015.
SPORTS
March 19, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Columnist
NEW YORK - Temple is the other Big Five school that will play here at the Barclay's Center in Brooklyn on Friday afternoon and it's probably fitting that the Owls will play after Villanova. The Wildcats, after all, did spend three weeks as the No. 1 team in the nation and have spent the last decade as the No. 1 college team in our area. For their part, the 10th-seeded Owls, unranked from start to finish this season, are happy to be here and eager to take on seventh-seeded Iowa. We know that because coach Fran Dunphy opened his media availability Thursday by telling us exactly that.
SPORTS
March 17, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Staff Writer
The first dunk made the statement. The second one stamped an exclamation point at the end. St. Augustine Prep was so dominant Saturday night in a 83-50 victory over Don Bosco Prep in the Non-Public A state title game that few individual moments stood out. Well, except for senior guard Sa'eed Nelson's 50-footer at the halftime buzzer that sent the Hermits into the locker room at Toms River North with a 49-23 edge. But before Nelson made his miracle shot, and before the Hermits spent most of the second half guarding an insurmountable lead, junior Justyn Mutts rocked the Pine Belt Arena with a pair of dunks.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | Vance Lehmkuhl
THANKS to hipster vegans, almond milk is suddenly a thing: Almonds, a "thirsty crop," are draining California's water and increasing the drought, all for a product that's only 2 percent nuts. Right? Hang on: Actually, almond milk was a thing back in the middle ages, used widely because it didn't spoil as quickly as cow's milk, and because for many, almonds were easier to get than cows. And the $900 million spent on almond milk last year, making it the declining dairy industry's top competitor, came from a much larger crowd than vegans and/or hipsters.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015
CHARLIE WILSON first came to prominence in the late 1970s as the frontman for the Gap Band, formed by Wilson and his brothers, Robert and Lonnie, in 1967 in their hometown of Tulsa, Okla. The siblings came by their musicality as the sons of a Pentecostal minister who insisted that his children learn to play various instruments. The band originally bore the name Greenwood, Archer and Pine Street Band, which was subsequently shortened to the G.A.P. Street Band. A printing error on an advertisement for a gig identified the unit as "The Gap Band," and the brothers claimed the name.
SPORTS
May 21, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
The new hockey coach is under an enormous amount of pressure. He is taking over a team that has a long tradition of winning and is used to selling out its state-of-the-art building. The new coach's fan base is also craving a long overdue championship. "A ton" of pressure, Brad Berry admitted Tuesday during a telephone interview from North Dakota. "The standards and expectations are very high, but I don't think I'd want it any other way. " You may not have heard of Berry before, but he is quite familiar with Dave Hakstol, the new hockey coach who grabbed the local headlines when he was hired by the Flyers on Monday.
SPORTS
March 12, 2015 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, Daily News Staff Writer barkowe@phillynews.com
GIVE Boise State some credit for an impressive rebound, Larry Krystkowiak the award for traveler of the year, and how on earth did former NFL quarterback Jeff George and the Toronto Maple Leafs get into a report about college basketball conference tournaments? Must be the Madness of March. Atlantic 10 At Brooklyn, N.Y. FIRST ROUND/Today 12-Fordham vs. 13-George Mason, 6:30 11-Duquesne vs. 14-Saint Louis, 9 SECOND ROUND/Tomorrow 8-Massachusetts vs. 9-La Salle, 12 5-VCU vs. Fordham/George Mason, 2:30 7-St.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Cellist Oliver Aldort remembers being struck by a particular quality of the Boston Symphony Orchestra while playing in the ensemble as a 17-year-old student at the Tanglewood Institute. "I had been used to a conservatory orchestra in which everyone is young and there is a constant turnover of players," he says, "and I had been used to the fact that so often the conductor will give the downbeat and there will be a lot of hesitation. . . . With the BSO, the orchestra had such a unified sense of rhythm as an ensemble - it was the easiest thing to play with.
SPORTS
December 16, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Jeremy Maclin caught the ball and turned around with an airplane strip's worth of green in front of him, and the ground at Lincoln Financial Field seemed to tilt, as if he were suddenly running downhill. Maclin weaved to the middle of the field and back toward the sideline, his fellow wide receiver Jordan Matthews running interference for him throughout the 72-yard journey, until Maclin's right elbow landed on the Cowboys' 1-yard line. The Eagles scored a touchdown on the next play. After spotting the Cowboys a 21-point lead, they trailed by four.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|