CollectionsBilingual Education
IN THE NEWS

Bilingual Education

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 10, 2000 | By Nedra Lindsey, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Lindenwold School District is expected to begin its first bilingual-education program this fall. In New Jersey, any school with 20 or more non-English-speaking students who speak the same language in a four-year age or grade range must institute a bilingual program. Of the nearly 1,400 students in Lindenwold schools, about 45 students will be in the district's English as a Second Language program in the new school year. Of those ESL students, there will be 22 Spanish- speaking children who speak little or no English in kindergarten through second grade.
NEWS
March 23, 2000 | By Linda Chavez
Bilingual education has been on the ropes for the last few years, but Education Secretary Richard Riley hopes to revive the embattled program by creating a thousand new programs around the country that will teach Spanish to English-speakers as well as teaching English to Spanish-speakers. This approach, called dual-immersion, has been around for decades, but only recently has become a favorite among those looking for a way to save bilingual education from an onslaught of reforms that threaten to eliminate it altogether.
NEWS
March 11, 1999 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anahi Martinez stared intently at the worksheet. "Queen," the 6-year-old said softly, pointing to a picture of a woman wearing a crown. Then, retreating into the comfort of Spanish, she said "peine," and picked out a drawing of a comb. For a moment after her first-grade teacher, Andres Vazquez, told her in English to circle the objects whose names started with Q, Anahi looked confused. When he gently repeated the instructions in Spanish, however, she tilted her round face toward the paper and began to move her pencil around the queen.
NEWS
June 12, 1998 | By Pedro A. Ramos
I applaud your "The New Philadelphians" series and the common-sense approach in your editorial on bilingual education (June 9). I also want to clarify statements quoted out of context in Myung Oak Kim's story (June 8), which do not reflect my unyielding support for strong and effective bilingual education. Philadelphia has been working quietly on the cutting edge of bilingual education for several years. The Children Achieving agenda's focus on standards, educational results and accountability have reinvigorated bilingual education efforts and brought them into the "mainstream.
NEWS
August 20, 2004
I am appalled at Paul Newman's outrageous letter on the subject of bilingual education ("Stop giving immigrants a bilingual education," Aug. 17). Holding back a student for one or two years while teaching him "only English" is an insensitive and impractical proposition. A one-subject curriculum for two years? Any child who survives such cruel treatment will then be subject to ridicule from his peers for being two years older than the rest of his class. This is a throwback to the "separate but equal" mentality.
NEWS
June 12, 1998 | By Morris Thompson
The upper Manhattan sidewalk was an after-work stream of Gucci-Pucci types on that late-winter afternoon. The neighborhood, once regarded as part of Spanish Harlem, was in full yuppification. As I waited for a friend, I got to see what happened as the crush of affluent humanity encountered the group of Puerto Rican teen-age boys having a very loud, very agitated discussion - in Spanish - outside a bodega. Some passers-by clutched their briefcases or shielded their purses. Others crossed the street.
NEWS
August 17, 2004
For our nation's children to succeed in life they need a good foundation in English - reading and writing. The days when immigrants could arrive in America with only ambition and a strong back and be successful are almost a thing of the past. There are very few good-paying jobs available to those who do not know English. Philadelphia should eliminate all of its current programs for those students whose first language is not English ("Bilingual students get new attention," Aug. 12)
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | By Laura Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ana Carrion, who moved to Camden from Puerto Rico 42 years ago, remembers her troubles learning English in elementary school. She remembers the teachers who said, "Now, you're an American and you no longer speak Spanish," and how they called her Ann, not Ana. "I did learn," she says, "but I never felt terrific about myself. " Carrion, 44, now teaches English to students at Northeast Elementary School in largely Hispanic North Camden. Today, students who come from Puerto Rico spend an average of three years in classes taught in both their native language and English.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | By Linda Chavez
In 30 years of following education reform, I've never seen a story quite like this one. A year ago, California voters opted to end bilingual education programs in their state in favor of intensive English instruction for non-English speaking students. The bilingual education lobby screamed racism and predicted nothing but heartache and failure for the children, most of whom are Hispanic. Now, statewide test scores are in, and low and behold, immigrant kids made solid, if modest, gains across all subject areas.
NEWS
June 7, 1998 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In one fell swoop last week, California voters pulled the plug on bilingual education, pushing all 1.4 million of the state's students with limited English into English immersion programs. Under the newly passed Proposition 227, after one year of intensive English-language instruction, students will be moved into regular academic classes, whether they understand them or not. This is policy-making California style - the sledgehammer approach to fixing problems. Like many a California quick fix, most of those who voted for the initiative in Tuesday's primary were not the ones directly affected.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Milton Showell Jr., 90, superintendent of the Lakewood Township (N.J.) School District in the 1970s, died Monday, June 8, at CareOne Harmony Village in Moorestown, where he had lived for the last 31/2 years. Born in Miami, Mr. Showell graduated from Lakewood High School and worked in administration for a troop carrier unit of the Army Air Corps from 1942 to 1944. He earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1947 at what is now Rider University and a master's at Teachers College of Columbia University in 1948.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the number of immigrant students and others with English-learning needs grows, Philadelphia School District leaders vowed Monday evening not to cut resources for bilingual education and related services despite continuing budget woes. The School Reform Commission held a nonvoting session to discuss the district's efforts to improve programs for 13,000 "English-language learners," of whom 3,000 are immigrants. The district has budgeted about $35.6 million for around 300 teachers who specialize in English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)
NEWS
September 22, 2007 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Rendell plans to name a prominent Hispanic, former City Solicitor Kenneth I. Trujillo, to an open seat on the Philadelphia School Reform Commission, The Inquirer has learned. The appointment would be subject to confirmation by the state Senate. If confirmed, Trujillo, who heads the boards of both the Greater Philadelphia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and Congreso de Latinos Unidos Inc., would become the commission's first Latino member since it was formed in 2001, when the state took over the district.
NEWS
October 24, 2005 | By Fran Ferrara
Are our schools failing to make our immigrant students fluent in English? Is bilingual education to blame? One might wonder, having read newspaper accounts about problems South Jersey school districts are having meeting No Child Left Behind standards for English-language learners. I am a Spanish bilingual first-grade teacher in one such district. In the 2003-04 school year, we did not meet our goal of having 50 percent of our English-language learners advance at least one level in fluency on a proficiency test.
NEWS
June 28, 2005
Divisive history plan Re: "Nay to a naysayer on black history," Commentary Page, June 23: Rather than consider the arguments of those opposed to a requirement for a year-long course in African American history, Acel Moore relies on the tried and true practice of implying that those opposed to the requirement must also be opposed to civil rights. Why else does he drop the name of "Klansman Edgar Ray Killen," whose only link to Philadelphia is that his trial was in Philadelphia, Mississippi?
NEWS
August 20, 2004
I am appalled at Paul Newman's outrageous letter on the subject of bilingual education ("Stop giving immigrants a bilingual education," Aug. 17). Holding back a student for one or two years while teaching him "only English" is an insensitive and impractical proposition. A one-subject curriculum for two years? Any child who survives such cruel treatment will then be subject to ridicule from his peers for being two years older than the rest of his class. This is a throwback to the "separate but equal" mentality.
NEWS
August 17, 2004
For our nation's children to succeed in life they need a good foundation in English - reading and writing. The days when immigrants could arrive in America with only ambition and a strong back and be successful are almost a thing of the past. There are very few good-paying jobs available to those who do not know English. Philadelphia should eliminate all of its current programs for those students whose first language is not English ("Bilingual students get new attention," Aug. 12)
NEWS
August 17, 2003
Re: "California schemin,' " editorial, Aug. 10: You missed the real point of why this drive for recall is taking place. The governor and many of the politicians that have ruled the state over the last decade or so have brought this calamity on themselves. You take issue with the capping of property taxes and the banning of bilingual education. What do you think caused the people to take these steps? They got tired of the government inventing programs that cost huge amounts of money and do nothing but cause more problems for Californians.
NEWS
August 14, 2003 | By Mona Charen
The nation owes Arnold Schwarzenegger gratitude for pushing Kobe Bryant out of the headlines for the first time in weeks. Still, the concept of recalling a sitting governor for anything less than moral turpitude strikes this conservative as ill-advised. Liberals, you may have noticed, tend not to cling very hard to principle. They are outcome-oriented. If judicial activism brings them the results they desire, they're all for judicial activism (as in the case of the Florida Supreme Court rewriting the election law ex post facto in 2000)
NEWS
October 25, 2002 | By Linda Chavez
Someone set Rita Montero's Volvo on fire as it sat parked in front of her Denver home last week. Maybe it's just a coincidence that Montero is leading the effort in Colorado to replace failing bilingual education programs with English immersion classes. But she doesn't think so, and neither do I. Colorado and Massachusetts are the two states where ballot initiatives this year will offer voters the chance to eliminate bilingual education, as California did in 1998 and Arizona in 2000.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|