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SPORTS
May 15, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Columnist
CALL THIS THE week of flip-flops. First on Chip, and now this: I want the designated hitter in the National League. While doubling the potential trade partners for Ryan Howard seems motivation enough, I want it for the same reasons many of you don't. Uniformity. Collegiate baseball uses a designated hitter. High school baseball uses a designated hitter. Hell, American Legion even uses it. Congratulations to Little League for holding out, but then again, man, those pitchers can hit. More and more, the ones coming into the major leagues cannot.
SPORTS
May 13, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
ROGER GOODELL'S initial four-game suspension of Tom Brady yesterday is twice as long as his initial suspension of Ray Rice was. He can still argue that's because he didn't know as much initially about the Rice affair as he did in this. But the real truth is that 10 months ago Goodell believed that altering the appearance of your fiancee was half as bad as altering the appearance of a football. And back in July, it's pretty much how he was paid to think. Spygate, Bountygate, and now, Deflategate - when it came to messing with rules and outcomes, Goodell ruled then with an iron fist, and does again now. The other stuff?
SPORTS
May 8, 2015 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
IT'S NOT so much that they cheated, it's how they cheated. It's not so much that they protested, it's how they protested. They cheated with utter arrogance and disdain. They protested with utter arrogance and contempt. Again. For this, the NFL should excoriate them. Ted Wells spent almost 4 months compiling a 243-page report that, on its surface, exonerated coach Bill Belichick and owner Robert Kraft from culpability in the actual deflation process. There was no evidentiary proof of their knowledge, which, strictly speaking, affords them plausible deniability.
SPORTS
May 1, 2015 | By Les Bowen, Daily News Staff Writer
TONIGHT, CLOSURE. Live from Chicago's Auditorium Theatre, shortly after 8 p.m. EDT, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell will call the name of Marcus Mariota, either on behalf of the Eagles or some other team. When that blessed moment finally arrives, we can quit speculating on what the Birds might be willing to give to obtain him, or whether he possibly could slide past this or that quarterback-needy team and make the price more palatable. This time tomorrow, sports talk radio and social media will either be in a Mariota-fueled frenzy, with local outlets frantically dispatching reporters to Hawaii (Oh, gosh, such short notice, you're really asking a lot, but I guess I'll take one for the team . . . )
SPORTS
March 7, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Trying to figure out Chip Kelly's plan for the Eagles is like trying to put together a jigsaw puzzle whose 1,000 pieces have been strewn and hidden about the house. You have to know where to search just to find the pieces themselves, and it will take a while before you have any idea what the picture is supposed to look like. What follows, then, comes with all the requisite caveats. Given that Kelly hasn't publicly discussed his strategy and likely won't until the NFL owners' meetings later this month, all anyone can do is offer a theory about what's ahead.
SPORTS
February 6, 2015
I THINK WE ALL can agree that Chip Kelly is a pretty good football coach. He proved that at the University of Oregon and has proved it again in his first 2 years with the Eagles, resuscitating a four-win team and racking up back-to-back 10-6 seasons. What we don't yet know, but are about to find out, is what kind of talent evaluator Kelly is. Many people assume that a good coach also is a good judge of football flesh. But the two don't necessarily go hand in hand. They're two very different jobs, two very different talents.
SPORTS
February 4, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Too bad the product could not stand alone. Too bad the discussion after the Super Bowl was not only about Pete Carroll's inexplicable play call and Malcolm Butler's instinctual life-changing play. Too bad this NFL season and this Super Bowl were not just about football. Too bad several dark clouds still hover above the NFL shield and the team that won the league's biggest game on Sunday. Sorry, but it was impossible to watch Roger Goodell posing in front of the Vince Lombardi Trophy on Monday morning with New England quarterback Tom Brady and think of it merely as a pleasant photo op for the league's commissioner and the three-time Super Bowl MVP. Justice, in fact, was served when the inept commissioner was confronted by such an awkward conclusion to the most tumultuous season of his tenure.
SPORTS
February 4, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
GLENDALE, Ariz. - The interception that changed Malcolm Butler's life and entered Super Bowl history happened on a play that resulted in a reception during practice. Butler, a rookie cornerback for the New England Patriots, had prepared for the Seattle Seahawks' much-debated pass from the 1-yard line during the two weeks leading up the Patriots' 28-24 Super Bowl victory. He studied it and the Patriots practiced it. But in practice, reserve receiver Josh Boyce made the catch against Butler.
SPORTS
February 3, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
LAST YEAR, Twitter reported that a record 24.9 million tweets were sent during the Super Bowl. That number was expected to be topped last night as the whole world was seemingly atwitter during and after the Patriots' win over the Seahawks. Here are some of the more interesting tweets we came across: * Former running back and NFL Hall of Famer Emmitt Smith (@EmmittSmith22): "That was the worst play call I've seen in the history of football. " * Former NFL receiver Terrell Owens (@terrellowens)
SPORTS
February 3, 2015
GLENDALE, Ariz. - It seems silly, the Super Bowl measuring sticks we sometimes place on quarterbacks. Tom Brady came very close to losing in his third straight Super Bowl appearance Sunday night and the argument, by some, would have been that he didn't warrant mention as the greatest, especially in light of "Deflategate. " The Patriots of Bill Belichick and Brady faced their largest deficit ever in a Super Bowl and the Seahawks, with a 24-14 lead early in the fourth quarter, looked as if they could not be beaten.
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