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Billy Hunter

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June 16, 2005 | By David Aldridge INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Billy Hunter, the executive director of the National Basketball Players Association, said yesterday that he would try to jump-start the stalled talks between the union and the NBA by contacting commissioner David Stern today. "I'm going to call David one more time between now and June 30," Hunter said in a news conference, referring to the expiration date of the collective-bargaining agreement between the teams and their players. Stern said Sunday that he anticipates a lockout beginning July 1, and that owners would remove their offer to the players from the table at that time.
SPORTS
June 28, 1998 | By Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As NBA commissioner David Stern looks out over Fifth Avenue, he can't help but hear the ominous rumblings coming from the Broadway office of Billy Hunter, the head of the players' union. Hunter's words have venom in them, and if, as expected, labor unrest comes to the NBA this week, Stern and the league will be up against a formidable adversary. Hunter has the backing of the players. He is used to competing on a larger stage, and he is not afraid of a fight. As a former district attorney in northern California, Hunter was a prosecutor in the Jim Jones case in the late 1970s, when a cult of 914 people died in the jungles of Guyana.
SPORTS
June 6, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, STAFF WRITER
On a summer night in 1955, Carmine Calzonetti walked around the corner from his family's home on Washington Terrace in Audubon to the baseball field next to the basketball courts and across the street from the high school. He wanted to see this pitcher from Delaware Township Little League. "I knew his name," Calzonetti said. "He was in the paper all the time for throwing no-hitters. " The pitcher was Billy Hunter. Later that summer, he would lead Delaware Township, which soon would be renamed Cherry Hill, to the first of two consecutive appearances in the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa. Flash forward 61 years.
SPORTS
November 14, 1998 | By Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After waiting two days for a phone call from Billy Hunter, executive director of the National Basketball Players Association, the league received one yesterday. But the caller was not Hunter. The call came from Jeffrey Kessler, an attorney with the law firm Weil & Gotshal, which has been retained by the players' union for the lockout negotiations. On Wednesday, union members said Hunter would contact NBA officials to set up another meeting. But according to the league, Kessler called yesterday to inform the league that further negotiations would not take place until the union was presented with something worth discussing.
SPORTS
June 21, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Lawyers for the NBA and its players union will meet today in New York as the two sides are on the verge of agreeing in principle to a 6-year collective bargaining agreement that could prevent a lockout, the New York Times News Service reported. Two people familiar with the negotiations, who requested anonymity because the details of the deal have not been finalized, said there were only a few remaining issues and that a deal could be wrapped up within the next 24 to 72 hours. Meanwhile, ESPN.
SPORTS
September 14, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
THE START of the NBA season was thrown into doubt yesterday after players and owners remained divided over the salary-cap structure at a key labor meeting. Tentative plans to talk again today were scrapped, and no further sessions were scheduled. Union executive director Billy Hunter said players were prepared to make a "significant" financial move, but found owners unwilling to budge off their positions. Commissioner David Stern and deputy commissioner Adam Silver countered that the union insisted the current cap remain exactly as is before they would agree to any further discussions.
SPORTS
November 4, 2011 | By Kate Fagan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The NBA and the players union will return to the bargaining table Saturday. That meeting will be the first after more than a week layoff. Last Friday, after three days and more than 30 hours of negotiating, union chief Billy Hunter held firm that the union would not accept less than 52 percent of the split of basketball revenue. Hunter's resolve on that split ended a productive string of sessions. Many believed those meetings would be the final push in the two sides' agreeing upon the league's next collective bargaining agreement.
SPORTS
January 3, 1999 | By Stephen A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The agent for Grant Hill yesterday denied that the Detroit Pistons star was one of more than 20 NBA players who had sought the help of Isiah Thomas to force the leadership of the National Basketball Players Association to permit a vote on the owners' supposedly final collective-bargaining offer. "I spoke to Grant this morning," said agent Lon Babby, reached at his Maryland home. "He said he hasn't talked to Isiah in months, as I suspected he had not. If Grant has something to say, he says it directly to the union, to me or directly to Billy Hunter [the director of the union]
SPORTS
December 1, 1998 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
This was to have been the second 1998-99 payday for NBA players. The day Patrick Ewing, the president of the National Basketball Players Association, was to have received a check for $1.54 million, the second of 12 installments on his $18.5 million salary from the New York Knicks. As Ewing missed a check in the midst of the league-imposed lockout, former union president Isiah Thomas suggested replacing Ewing and union executive director Billy Hunter at the bargaining table as an option.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By Kate Fagan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NEW YORK - Billy Hunter answered one last question Friday while gathering his bag and coat from the floor of an upscale Manhattan hotel. "Are there any circumstances under which the union would be willing to accept a split of 50-50?" Hunter, who had spent 30 hours in the last three days bargaining with the NBA on behalf of the league's locked-out players, answered quickly. "Not now," he said, and then he was gone. There's a lot of "not now" happening around the NBA. For instance, now that this round of labor negotiations has sputtered, the NBA will not play any games in November.
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SPORTS
June 6, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, STAFF WRITER
On a summer night in 1955, Carmine Calzonetti walked around the corner from his family's home on Washington Terrace in Audubon to the baseball field next to the basketball courts and across the street from the high school. He wanted to see this pitcher from Delaware Township Little League. "I knew his name," Calzonetti said. "He was in the paper all the time for throwing no-hitters. " The pitcher was Billy Hunter. Later that summer, he would lead Delaware Township, which soon would be renamed Cherry Hill, to the first of two consecutive appearances in the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa. Flash forward 61 years.
SPORTS
February 19, 2015 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
NEW YORK - About 10 months ago, new NBA commissioner Adam Silver made the overly optimistic statement that he had "no expectation" that the National Basketball Players Association would opt out of the 10-year collective bargaining agreement the two parties agreed to in 2011. "I think it's premature, frankly, for either side to be making determinations about how well this deal has or hasn't worked," Silver said last April, "and I think especially given that [the NBPA] leader hasn't even been installed yet, which is something that they, of course, are freely acknowledging.
SPORTS
February 17, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW ORLEANS - So close. Michael Carter-Williams and Orlando Magic guard Victor Oladipo were one-tenth of a second from becoming the Skills Challenge champions at NBA All-Star Saturday. Utah Jazz guard Trey Burke and Portland Trail Blazer guard Damian Lillard completed the course in 45.2 seconds in the final at Smoothie King Center. Meanwhile, the 76ers point guard and Oladipo had a time of 45.3. "It was tough," Carter-Williams said of losing by a slim margin. He was asked to name some of the things he could do in one-tenth of a second.
SPORTS
May 17, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
CARMELO ANTHONY scored 28 points to help the New York Knicks stay alive in the Eastern Conference semifinals with an 85-75 victory over the visiting Indiana Pacers in Game 5 last night. Reserves J.R. Smith and Chris Copeland each had 13 points for the Knicks, who trail 3-2 and will need a victory tomorrow in Indiana to force a seventh game in New York on Monday. They are trying to become the ninth NBA team to overcome a 3-1 deficit to win a series. Anthony, who didn't make a basket in the fourth quarter of either game in Indiana, made a jumper midway through the final quarter last night after Indiana closed within four points.
SPORTS
December 8, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
NBA PLAYERS have agreed to additional drug testing, adding offseason screening for performance-enhancing drugs only. Union executive director Billy Hunter sent a memo yesterday, obtained by the Associated Press , to players detailing these and other changes of a new labor deal and recommended they ratify the agreement. Less clear is a provision for human growth hormone testing. According to the memo, an NBA-NBPA joint committee would study the "possibility of an HGH testing program.
SPORTS
December 5, 2011 | DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORT
THE COUNTDOWN continues to the return of the NBA as the final steps are being put in place to end the lockout and start free agency and training camps this week. Here is a day-by-day breakdown of some of what you can expect:   Today *  NBA executives and coaches can start talking to players, including free agents, beginning at 10 a.m., ESPN.com reported. Teams also can give physicals to players, meaning free-agent visits will be allowed. However, no oral or written agreements can be reached with free agents, as has been the case since Wednesday.
NEWS
November 27, 2011 | By Kate Fagan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The NBA and representatives of what was formerly the National Basketball Players Association reached a tentative agreement early Saturday morning to end the league's 149-day lockout. The league expects to open the season with a tripleheader on Christmas Day. Despite missing almost eight weeks of the season, the NBA is aiming to squeeze in a 66-game season for each team, which would require extending the regular season by approximately two weeks and condensing the playoffs. A typical NBA season begins about Nov. 1 and includes 82 games.
SPORTS
November 15, 2011 | BY BOB COONEY, cooneyb@phillynews.com
NEW YORK - For now, the talk of Basketball Related Income can be put on hold. Forget, for a bit, about hard or flexible salary caps, about long-term contracts or system and spending restrictions. For that matter, you might want to forget about seeing professional basketball for what might be an extended amount of time, maybe even the entire 2011-12 season. Yesterday in a small, overcrowded meeting room on the second floor of the Westin Hotel in Times Square, union executive Billy Hunter and a group of about 50 players merrily entered.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Kate Fagan, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - The 2011-12 NBA season is in jeopardy. Although the season has been in doubt since the NBA locked out its 450 players on July 1, the National Basketball Players Association rejected the league's "final" proposal on Monday afternoon and announced it was dissolving the union in favor of legal action. The union's actions Monday, spurred by the NBA's proposal, significantly increased the possibility that there will be no 2011-12 season. "We have arrived at the conclusion that the collective-bargaining agreement has completely broken down," union chief Billy Hunter said.
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