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Binge Drinking

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NEWS
December 30, 2007 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Brick calls it "the hangover circuit. " It happens November through New Year's Eve, when the Solebury scientist and researcher starts getting calls from people wanting to know the skinny on that nauseating, head-throbbing, hand-shaking experience. Why do sufferers see rooms that spin, get headaches that are mind-numbing, and maybe even wake up next to people they don't remember? After 30 years of studying the effects of drugs and alcohol, Brick has become a go-to guy. This year, he decided to write it all down in The Doctor's Hangover Handbook: The Intelligent Person's Guide to Curious and Scientific Facts About Alcohol and Hangovers.
NEWS
April 24, 2008
The death of a 15-year-old Philadelphia girl who police say had spent hours knocking back cups of hard liquor with friends is yet another sad lesson on the dangers of binge drinking among teenagers. About 90 percent of the alcohol consumed by youths under the age of 21 in the United States is in the form of binge drinking, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fewer young people are drinking, but those who do drink do so at dangerously high levels.
NEWS
September 13, 2003 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Binge drinking is more common at colleges where nearby bars and liquor stores offer specials such as two-for-one drinks and discounted cases of beer, according to a study released yesterday in Philadelphia. The study of 118 colleges nationwide found that about 48 percent of students in college communities where alcohol was heavily marketed reported engaging in binge drinking, compared with about 39 percent of students at colleges where there was less promoting, advertising and discounting of alcohol at local establishments.
NEWS
August 7, 2007
Getting a handle on binge drinking at the nation's colleges and universities is a year-in, year-out challenge for school officials. Rarely, but tragically, their effort to deter unsafe drinking is met by the worst defeat - a student's death. Rider University faced such a calamity this past semester when an 18-year-old freshman died following a fraternity pledge initiation event. Gary DeVercelly of Long Beach, Calif., had a blood alcohol level more than five times the legal limit.
NEWS
March 3, 2005 | By Marybeth T. Hagan
Reading fiction is usually a great escape for me. But Tom Wolfe's book I am Charlotte Simmons plopped me right back into the real world of parental worries. Wolfe, a master of social commentary, holds nothing back in his 676-page novel about the alcoholic extracurricular activities of foul-mouthed students at an imaginary Ivy League university in Chester. For this mother of one college student and two soon to follow, the book read like a genre I generally avoid - the horror story.
NEWS
April 28, 2000 | By Melanie Burney, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rasheed Daniel could time his freshman charges at Rowan University like clockwork: After a night of drinking, the intoxicated brood would stumble into the dorm at 2 a.m. When the ritual was repeated every weekend, Daniel, a residence hall adviser, knew the underclassmen under his supervision had a problem with binge drinking. "They would walk into the cafe the next day and say, 'Dude, what happened to me last night?' " said Daniel, 21, of Clayton. "It was a big joke. But it's not funny.
NEWS
August 22, 1999 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At Penn State, where classes start this week, students soon will see posters giving them a reality check about drinking. "Most PSU students drink two or fewer nights during a typical week," some posters will say. At La Salle University, some freshmen can win dollar bills and refrigerator magnets if they know the correct campus statistics for alcohol use when the question pops up in class. And Temple University will plaster residence halls, campus kiosks, classroom walls, shuttle buses, bathroom stalls and cafeteria tables with pink elephants to alert students to "get the facts" about alcohol use at the school.
NEWS
July 23, 1996 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As vices go, drinking and drugs are not ordinarily associated with the animal kingdom. But alcohol has great appeal to some nonhuman creatures, especially a strain of mice being studied at Princeton University that will drink themselves into a stupor. "If you give them a bottle of alcohol and a bottle of water, they take 80 percent of their liquid from the alcohol bottle," said Princeton biologist Lee Silver. "They are constantly drunk. " Last month, Silver and his colleagues announced that they had closed in on two genes they believe are responsible for passing alcoholism down from one mouse generation to the next.
NEWS
May 5, 2002
Trying to fit in Students drink to fit in and to have something in common with others. College is a whole new atmosphere and everyone is starting over again from scratch to create a niche and reputation for themselves. They will do things that they are not used to just because other kids do it, including binge drinking. I don't think colleges can do much about it. Once students move into off-campus housing, there is very little, legally, that the school can do. It becomes the responsibility of local authorities, who may be distracted by more serious issues.
NEWS
December 31, 1994 | By OLIVER J. MORGAN
In 1988 college and university presidents around the country singled out students' "binge drinking" as one of the most serious problems at their schools and in all of higher education. So why, six years later, is student drinking still out of control on many of these very same campuses? Why is this threat to students' learning and development - not to mention our nation's ability to compete in the world - still so prevalent? It's easy to recite the old mantra: "This is a difficult problem, long in the making;' it needs patience.
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NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
A six-year campaign in Haddonfield to curb binge drinking among high school students by threatening to ban them from extracurricular activities could be at its end. New Jersey Education Commissioner Christopher Cerf is reviewing the affluent Camden County district's "24-7" policy after a state appellate court ruling last month struck down a similar policy at a North Jersey high school. The Haddonfield school board subsequently suspended its policy, which bars students charged with drug and alcohol offenses from representing the school publicly in activities such as athletics and school plays.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA - College-age drinkers average nine drinks when they get drunk, government health officials said yesterday. That statistic is part of a new report highlighting the dangers of binge-drinking, which usually means four to five drinks at a time. Overall, about one in six U.S. adults surveyed said they had binged on alcohol at least once in the previous month, though it was more than one in four for those ages 18 to 34. And that's likely an underestimate: Alcohol sales figures suggest people are buying a lot more alcohol than they say they are consuming.
NEWS
December 18, 2011
Dawn M. Meling is the deputy director of public affairs of the Commonwealth Foundation In high school, I threw the javelin in track and field, badly wanting to be recruited by a college athletics program. My father would joke that he never had to worry about high school boys and unwanted attention toward me because I could out-bench press almost every guy in my school. And that was my attitude too - nothing to worry about. So it was rather eye-opening when I got to college, taking part in rape awareness programs, learning that my javelin-throwing skills were no match for a "roofie" or inconspicuous predator.
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | LOS ANGELES TIME
LOS ANGELES - Drinking as few as three to six glasses of wine per week may increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer by 15 percent, according to an analysis by Harvard researchers. The study, published yesterday in the Journal of the American Medical Association , reaffirms that heavy alcohol use raises breast-cancer risk, and it adds that light drinking matters, too. Whether women should consider abstaining from even light alcohol consumption, however, is not easily answered, preventive- health experts said.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA - Drunken driving incidents have fallen 30 percent in the last five years, and last year were at their lowest mark in nearly two decades, according to a federal report. The decline may be due to the down economy: Other research suggests people are still drinking as heavily as in years past, so some may just be finding cheaper ways of imbibing than by going to bars, night clubs and restaurants. "One possibility is that people are drinking at home more and driving less after drinking," said Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
WASHINGTON - A new government survey says more Americans are smoking marijuana, but other notorious illegal drugs have fallen off. Nearly 7 percent of Americans aged 12 or older were illicit pot smokers in 2010, according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, released Thursday. That is three million more users than earlier in the decade. At the same time, meth use has plunged by about half and cocaine use - including crack - is down sharply in the last few years. The annual survey by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration also found declines from 2009 in tobacco use and binge drinking among teens.
NEWS
May 16, 2011
High selenium doses won't cut risk of cancer, study concludes You won't cut your cancer risk by taking high doses of selenium, a mineral that is essential for health but required only in tiny amounts. That's the conclusion of researchers at the University of Modena in Italy who reviewed 55 studies of selenium intake and various types of cancer. Although the mineral has healthful antioxidant properties, six rigorous studies in which participants took selenium supplements or a placebo found no benefit to extra selenium.
SPORTS
August 23, 2009
From: Gonzalez, John Last year, the NFL put out a fan code of conduct and encouraged people to inform on their fellow fans via secret texts to stadium security. This year, the NFL has targeted tailgating. According to USA Today, in addition to making recommendations about the serving sizes of beer inside stadiums, the league has asked all 32 teams to prevent tailgating from starting more than three hours before kickoff. That sound you hear is the gasp of every Eagles fan who likes to show up for a Monday Night Football game around dawn.
NEWS
September 7, 2008
No solution There has been a growing debate both locally and nationally about the legal drinking age, binge drinking, and college presidents signing on to a movement called the Amethyst Initiative. Mothers Against Drunk Driving certainly does not have all the answers and feels a discussion on the topic is appropriate. But to suggest lowering the legal drinking age to 18 will curb binge drinking goes beyond reason. Certainly MADD is concerned about increased DUI crashes, but even more important are the health issues surrounding childhood drinking and the addictive nature of alcohol.
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