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SPORTS
June 2, 2010
SEVERAL FANS have asked me via e-mail if I think the Phillies' epic team batting slump is a reflection of Charlie Manuel's normally robust lineup no longer getting signs relayed by bullpen coach Mick Billmeyer. Allegedly relayed, that is. My replies have been rooted in mid-20th century logic. How would a coach seated more than 400 feet from home plate be able to peer through binoculars at a sign typically flashed by pitcher to catcher just seconds before the delivery and then relay it to the bench?
NEWS
August 4, 1996 | By Jane R. Eisner, Editor of the Editorial Page
Roger Tory Peterson came into my life nearly 23 years ago, unexpectedly. It was my first year in college, and I was smitten by a red-bearded sophomore who finally, finally asked me to see a movie with him. But when the film was over, he high-tailed it back to his dorm room. Why? To get a good night's sleep, so that he could wake up at dawn and go bird-watching. Oh great, I thought. A bird-watcher? For a city girl like me? Little did I know then that the student enthralled with the wood thrush and the warbler would become the man of my dreams and the father of my children.
NEWS
October 27, 1995 | For The Inquirer / DAVID J. JACKSON
Hawk-watcher-in-training Lauren Johnson, 2, of Haverford, brandishes toilet-paper-tube binoculars at Militia Hill, Fort Washington State Park. Her mother, Sheryl (left), was helping with the annual count.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | By Jack McGuire, Daily News Staff Writer
A North Philadelphia man was arrested yesterday and charged with stealing a pair of binoculars from the balloonists who inadvertently landed in a vacant lot at 7th and Oxford streets Saturday, police said. Acting on a tip from the Daily News, police went to the home of James "Big Boy" Williams, 31, on Franklin Street near Master to charge him with the theft, police said. But Williams wasn't home, and Detective Sgts. Gerard Duffy and Shawn Trush returned to East Detectives headquarters, only to find Williams sitting there, being booked on unrelated robbery charges, police said.
NEWS
June 9, 1989 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Anyone blundering into Common Pleas Judge Marvin R. Halbert's courtroom yesterday might have wondered if the judge was conducting a seminar for peeping toms. One by one, members of a jury were stepping onto a chair and looking out a sixth-floor City Hall window with a pair of high-powered binoculars. "I could see the faces and lips of people far away," one juror said later. What judge and jury wanted to find out was whether Police Officer George Ondrejka really could see a drug deal going down at 150 yards with those binoculars, as he testified in the trial of Carlos Reyes, 20. Ondrejka said he saw Reyes sell more than three grams of cocaine to a 17- year-old New Jersey youth on 5th Street near Cecil B. Moore Avenue last Aug. 25. The officer said he was sitting in a police wagon more than a block away, watching the deal with his personal binoculars.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1990 | By Christopher Mumma, Special to The Inquirer
Wolfgang Harms looks over his company's main product M-22 binoculars for the Army - with a studied eye. He can't understand why the Army doesn't want more of them. "Everybody's been making a big fuss about the danger over chemical weapons in Saudi Arabia," said Harms, president of Pioneer Marketing & Research Inc., of Westmont. "I think that the laser problem is just as important. " There is very little danger of open, pitched battles featuring futuristic laser weapons in the Saudi desert any time soon.
SPORTS
May 14, 2010 | Staff and wire report
Major League Baseball commissioner Bud Selig said yesterday his staff will review allegations that the Phillies tried to steal signs in a game against the Colorado Rockies on Monday night. The Rockies lodged a formal complaint after Phillies bullpen coach Mick Billmeyer was caught by a television camera peering through binoculars from the bullpen bench at Coors Field during the second inning. The Rockies complained to Jerry Crawford, who called Phillies manager Charlie Manuel onto the field and told him to tell Billmeyer to stop using the binoculars.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The drug dealers around Paxon Street and Warrington Avenue must have thought it was the end of the world when a judge, a bunch of lawyers and other well-dressed men and women pulled up to their corner in a bus one day last week. But they needn't have worried. The caravan was in Southwest Philadelphia to help a jury decide the guilt or innocence of a man accused of making drug sales at the corner last September. The jurors opted for innocent after peering through the binoculars a police officer said he had used to identify the suspect.
NEWS
October 3, 1986 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer
There are big celestial doings today - a partial eclipse of the sun. How partial, you ask? At 3:17 p.m. as seen from Philadelphia, the moon will cover 67.7 percent of the sun's disk, according to the folks at the Franklin Institute. A solar eclipse occurs when the moon moves between the sun and the viewer's place on the earth. Today's eclipse will be total in the Atlantic Ocean, off the tip of Iceland, if you happen to be out that way. The partial eclipse will be visible from the contiguous United States, except the West Coast.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
James Williams, detectives said, admitted to having been "an opportunist" when the big hot-air balloon touched down on a vacant lot at Seventh and Oxford Streets Saturday evening. According to police, Williams said he took a pair of binoculars from the craft. Williams, 31, of the 1400 block of North Franklin Street in North Philadelphia, was arrested yesterday and charged with theft and receiving stolen property. He is the first suspect arrested in the Philadelphia Balloon Race robbery.
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SPORTS
August 22, 2010 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
You can't sit around waiting to react to things. Not any longer. These days, with the never-ending news cycle and the public's ever-growing appetite for instant information, you have to forecast the future. Nostradamus and ESPN taught us that. I was watching the Brett Favre Television Network recently when the talking heads paused their aging-quarterback-retirement watch long enough to discuss baseball. It was a welcome respite. Before long, one of the analysts was predicting who would win the National League MVP - a neat trick, since the season has more than a month to go. But, hey, if you aren't leading the way, you're following someone else.
SPORTS
June 2, 2010
SEVERAL FANS have asked me via e-mail if I think the Phillies' epic team batting slump is a reflection of Charlie Manuel's normally robust lineup no longer getting signs relayed by bullpen coach Mick Billmeyer. Allegedly relayed, that is. My replies have been rooted in mid-20th century logic. How would a coach seated more than 400 feet from home plate be able to peer through binoculars at a sign typically flashed by pitcher to catcher just seconds before the delivery and then relay it to the bench?
SPORTS
May 16, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just as many anticipated they would, the 2010 Phillies have made history. By touching off a baseball-cheating scandal this week, they've accomplished something no Phillies team has managed for the last 110 years. Thanks to bullpen coach Mick Billmeyer's hamfisted effort with a pair of binoculars in the Coors Field bullpen, the 1900 Phillies finally have some company in franchise infamy. Give the 1900 Phils more credit, however, than this less-than-subtle generation of Phillies spies.
SPORTS
May 16, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just as many anticipated they would, the 2010 Phillies have made history. By touching off a baseball-cheating scandal this week, they've accomplished something no Phillies team has managed for the last 110 years. Thanks to bullpen coach Mick Billmeyer's hamfisted effort with a pair of binoculars in the Coors Field bullpen, the 1900 Phillies finally have some company in franchise infamy. Give the 1900 Phils more credit, however, than this less-than-subtle generation of Phillies spies.
SPORTS
May 14, 2010 | by Paul Hagen
SO THE PHILLIES got caught. Busted. Bullpen coach Mick Billmeyer captured on video tape with binoculars, apparently looking at the signs being put down by Rockies catcher Miguel Olivo. Outrage and denials ensue. Puh-leeze. Let's get real here. It happens. The Mets, one source said with a laugh, were so convinced that the Phillies were using cameras at Citizens Bank Park to steal signs that they asked Major League Baseball to investigate. They did, but only after telling the Phillies they were coming.
SPORTS
May 14, 2010 | Staff and wire report
Major League Baseball commissioner Bud Selig said yesterday his staff will review allegations that the Phillies tried to steal signs in a game against the Colorado Rockies on Monday night. The Rockies lodged a formal complaint after Phillies bullpen coach Mick Billmeyer was caught by a television camera peering through binoculars from the bullpen bench at Coors Field during the second inning. The Rockies complained to Jerry Crawford, who called Phillies manager Charlie Manuel onto the field and told him to tell Billmeyer to stop using the binoculars.
SPORTS
May 13, 2010 | By Matt Gelb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the last four seasons, the Phillies have often been accused of stealing signs. In 2007, the Mets went as far to say the Phillies had a hidden camera at Citizens Bank Park that they were using to record and relay signs to hitters. On Monday, the Rockies were the latest to file a complaint with Major League Baseball about the Phillies' tactics. But Phillies manager Charlie Manuel vehemently denied his club was stealing signs. So why all the accusations? "Because we beat them," Manuel said.
SPORTS
May 13, 2010 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
DENVER - In the last four seasons, the Phillies have often been accused of stealing signs. In 2007, the Mets went as far to say the Phillies had a hidden camera at Citizens Bank Park that they were using to record and relay signs to hitters. On Monday, the Rockies were the latest to file a complaint with Major League Baseball about the Phillies' tactics. But Phillies manager Charlie Manuel vehemently denied his club was stealing signs. So why all the accusations? "Because we beat them," Manuel said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2008 | By BECKY BATCHA, batchab@phillynews.com 215-854-5757
When we ran into Jim Seiwell at the end of the Earth - on a secluded deck overlooking a protected stretch of the Jersey Shore next to a gated Coast Guard installation - we suspected he was scamming the system. Regulations at this secret beachfront, managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, limit visitors to certain low-impact activities, like bird-watching and nature studies. No sunbathing allowed. So here was a wily sunbather, we figured, parked in his beach chair with his Tom Clancy novel and cunningly wearing binoculars around his neck to establish credible cover as a bird-watcher.
NEWS
September 23, 2006
The first day of fall is upon us, but before we welcome the change of season, readers share their thoughts about the final weeks of the summer. Mary F. Rueger Warrington Five years ago, we took our two oldest grandsons on a camping trip to Niagara Falls. We all had a blast. Of course, that led to "When are you taking us to Niagara Falls, Grams?" from the other six. So this summer we took the four granddaughters, who were properly impressed with this natural wonder, and once again, we had a great time.
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