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Biochemistry

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NEWS
February 12, 2001 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sidney Weinhouse, 91, a pioneering biochemist and cancer researcher who spent most of his career at Temple University, died Friday at his home in Philadelphia. The son of Russian Jewish immigrants, he was born in Chicago and received his bachelor's and doctoral degrees in organic chemistry from the University of Chicago. He entered the developing field of biochemistry before World War II and initially worked on deciphering the chemical composition of cholesterol and other fatty materials that block arteries and cause heart disease.
NEWS
July 25, 1994 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
JoAnne Grove Pieringer, 59, a beloved biochemistry professor, died Friday evening after a long illness at Suburban Woods Health and Rehabilitation Center in East Norriton. A 30-year resident of Lafayette Hill, Dr. Pieringer taught biochemistry and served as vice chairwoman of the department at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. In the school yearbook, the Class of 1994 referred to her as "Our Biochemistry Savior. " Dr. Pieringer was voted the school's Teacher of the Year in 1992 and 1993.
SPORTS
December 6, 1995 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Time. It is a commodity that Temple's Marco Van Velsen values more than most student-athletes. Because when school is in session, he doesn't have much of a life, social or otherwise. "Sometimes, you have periods where it really gets hectic," said the 6-10 senior center. "You'll never see me sitting in my room doing nothing. " Van Velsen, who came to North Broad Street from Holland via Cherry Hill East High, is majoring in biochemistry. He has a 3.3 grade-point average, and will graduate next December.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phoebe Starfield Leboy, 75, of Narberth, a groundbreaking academic activist who retired in 2005 as a professor at the School of Dental Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, died of Lou Gehrig's disease on Saturday, June 16, at her home. She was chair of Penn's Faculty Senate in 1981-82 and chair of the biochemistry department at the dental school from 1992 to 1995. In retirement, she was the national president in 2008-09 of the Association for Women in Science. Three of her Penn faculty colleagues, Sherri Adams, Susan Margulies, and Susan Volk issued an appreciation upon her death, which recalled her arrival on the faculty in 1967.
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James J. Ferguson Jr., 75, professor emeritus of medicine and biochemistry at the University of Pennsylvania and a former associate dean of its medical school, died Saturday at his home in Chevy Chase, Md., of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Lou Gehrig's disease. Before moving to Chevy Chase in 1986, Dr. Ferguson had been a resident of Bryn Mawr. Dr. Ferguson was a man blessed with the kind of intellect and ambition that seemingly allowed him to master whatever his eyes beheld.
NEWS
January 21, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas R. Kadesch, 58, of Bala Cynwyd, interim chair of the department of genetics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine since 2006, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, after pancreatic surgery at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. A Penn spokeswoman stated that "Dr. Kadesch's research concentrated on ways in which cells control the expression of their genes. " In recent years, she stated, "his lab focused on a particular molecular process called the Notch signaling pathway that is critical to cell differentiation.
NEWS
February 12, 1995 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Dwight B. McNair Scott, 87, who in 1935 became the first woman ever appointed to the faculty at Harvard Medical School, died Thursday at Hahnemann University Hospital. She lived in Center City. During her long and pioneering career, Professor Scott helped discover niacin, the B-complex vitamin, while serving on the chemistry faculty at Wellesley College in 1943. At the time of her death, she was a professor emeritus of biochemistry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | By KATHY BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer
A Nobel Prize-winning researcher at the Fox Chase Cancer Center will soon claim one of academia's top prizes: master of an Oxford University college. Baruch Blumberg, 62, a Society Hill resident and professor of biochemistry and anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania, was chosen this week to be the first American to head Oxford University's Balliol College. But since the position will require his presence only about seven months out of the year, Blumberg said yesterday he will not give up his research and teaching positions in Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | By Monica L. Williams, Special to The Inquirer
Dawn B. Marks is one of five Temple University faculty members who received a "Great Teacher Award" and $10,000 from the university last week. Marks, a resident of Plymouth Meeting, is an associate professor of biochemistry and assistant dean for graduate studies at Temple's School of Medicine. She has earned a national reputation for developing innovative techniques to teach biochemistry and molecular biology. In the laboratory, her major research interest deals with the regulation of protein levels in the cell.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years Herb Bassow has griped about how science is taught in high school. The veteran Germantown Friends science teacher has complained that students are confined to classrooms, don't get enough laboratory time and have to wait until college to study biochemistry, an important and "hot" specialty where groundbreaking research is making headlines regularly. And secondary students rarely get a chance to glimpse - let alone participate - in actual scientific research. Is it any wonder so few students are going into the sciences?
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NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phoebe Starfield Leboy, 75, of Narberth, a groundbreaking academic activist who retired in 2005 as a professor at the School of Dental Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, died of Lou Gehrig's disease on Saturday, June 16, at her home. She was chair of Penn's Faculty Senate in 1981-82 and chair of the biochemistry department at the dental school from 1992 to 1995. In retirement, she was the national president in 2008-09 of the Association for Women in Science. Three of her Penn faculty colleagues, Sherri Adams, Susan Margulies, and Susan Volk issued an appreciation upon her death, which recalled her arrival on the faculty in 1967.
NEWS
January 21, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas R. Kadesch, 58, of Bala Cynwyd, interim chair of the department of genetics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine since 2006, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, after pancreatic surgery at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. A Penn spokeswoman stated that "Dr. Kadesch's research concentrated on ways in which cells control the expression of their genes. " In recent years, she stated, "his lab focused on a particular molecular process called the Notch signaling pathway that is critical to cell differentiation.
NEWS
October 4, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Rutman, 91, formerly of West Mount Airy, a professor of biochemistry and a social activist who lost his job during the McCarthy era, died of heart failure Monday, Sept. 20, at Ahwatukee Care Center in Phoenix. Dr. Rutman and three other professors were fired from Jefferson Medical College for alleged communist affiliations in 1953, a month after he had been called before a House Un-American Activities subcommittee in Philadelphia. He invoked the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution when asked if he ever had been a member of the Communist Party.
NEWS
November 18, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jane Mills Glick, 65, of Swarthmore, a biochemist, died Sunday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania of head trauma from a fall in her home. From 2002 until she retired in May 2008, Dr. Glick was faculty administrator of the Cell and Molecular Biology (CAMB) graduate program at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Previously, she was director of education in the gene-therapy program at Penn for eight years, and also associate professor in cell and molecular biology.
NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adelaide M. Delluva, 88, a biochemistry professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine and former associate dean of student affairs, died of heart failure May 31 at home in Center City. She collapsed while preparing for her daily trip to the campus where she had worked for 60 years. Born in Bethlehem, Pa., she earned a bachelor's degree in 1939 and a master's in 1940, both in biology, from Bucknell University. After earning her doctorate in 1946 from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, she was hired as an instructor of biochemistry.
NEWS
October 18, 2005 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Intelligent design is a scientific alternative to Darwin's theory of evolution and is not the same as Bible-based creationism, one of intelligent design's leading proponents testified yesterday in federal court. Michael Behe, a biochemistry professor at Lehigh University, said intelligent design - the idea that life is so complex there must be a supreme being - is science because it can be explained through "physical, observable and empirical facts of nature. " Behe was the first witness called by the Dover school board, which was sued by 11 parents after it required high school biology teachers to read a statement to students saying Darwin's theory has unexplained "gaps," and asking students to "keep an open mind" when considering the possibility of intelligent design.
NEWS
February 21, 2001 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James J. Ferguson Jr., 75, professor emeritus of medicine and biochemistry at the University of Pennsylvania and a former associate dean of its medical school, died Saturday at his home in Chevy Chase, Md., of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Lou Gehrig's disease. Before moving to Chevy Chase in 1986, Dr. Ferguson had been a resident of Bryn Mawr. Dr. Ferguson was a man blessed with the kind of intellect and ambition that seemingly allowed him to master whatever his eyes beheld.
NEWS
February 12, 2001 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sidney Weinhouse, 91, a pioneering biochemist and cancer researcher who spent most of his career at Temple University, died Friday at his home in Philadelphia. The son of Russian Jewish immigrants, he was born in Chicago and received his bachelor's and doctoral degrees in organic chemistry from the University of Chicago. He entered the developing field of biochemistry before World War II and initially worked on deciphering the chemical composition of cholesterol and other fatty materials that block arteries and cause heart disease.
SPORTS
December 6, 1995 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Time. It is a commodity that Temple's Marco Van Velsen values more than most student-athletes. Because when school is in session, he doesn't have much of a life, social or otherwise. "Sometimes, you have periods where it really gets hectic," said the 6-10 senior center. "You'll never see me sitting in my room doing nothing. " Van Velsen, who came to North Broad Street from Holland via Cherry Hill East High, is majoring in biochemistry. He has a 3.3 grade-point average, and will graduate next December.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | By Wendy Greenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Commencements at area colleges feature a political reporter, radio veteran and biochemist. William H. Siemering, a founding member of National Public Radio and developer of the program, "All Things Considered," will deliver the keynote address at the Beaver College commencement May 19 and receive an honorary degree. Nearly 500 bachelor's and master's degrees will be conferred at the ceremonies on the soccer and lacrosse field at the Glenside campus. President Bette E. Landman will preside.
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