CollectionsBiodiesel
IN THE NEWS

Biodiesel

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 6, 2008 | By Shawn Piatek, JOHNSTOWN TRIBUNE-DEMOCRAT
JOHNSTOWN, Pa. - Every business looks for a trademark, and Matthew Danchanko has spent five years toiling to make quality the mark of his general contracting company in Johnstown. But since last week, the most discernible quality of Danchanko Inc. might be that its dump truck smells like french fries. With diesel costs climbing locally to nearly $4.90 a gallon, Danchanko began researching biodiesel and invested about $3,500 in the equipment and supplies he needed. Biodiesel is made through a process of straining used cooking oil - procured from restaurants for a small fee - that is mixed with select additives.
NEWS
June 14, 2007 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They are 14 young people, spending the summer traveling across the country with a mission: learning and raising awareness about environmental and American Indian issues. Their first stop: Philadelphia. The activists, aged 21 to 25, rolled up to the Fairmount Park Visitors Center adjacent to Love Park in Center City yesterday on a biodiesel-powered bus to spread the word about conservation. All are recipients of Morris K. Udall Scholarships, named for the late senator from Arizona, who was an advocate of environmentalism and the interests of American Indians.
NEWS
August 13, 2006 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
High gas prices never bother Kipp Bachurski, who commutes about 50 miles every day. The trip on the turnpike and Blue Route from his home in Hatboro to his job in the Lower Merion School District costs him $2 daily in tolls, but less than 60 cents in fuel. Bachurski powers his 1998 Volkswagen Beetle with free vegetable oil recycled from Harriton High School's cafeteria. "I'm not buying gas. I'm burning cleaner fuel," Bachurski said with a smile. "I spend pennies a day on gas," he added.
NEWS
August 9, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At 12th and Vine Streets this fall, a gasoline station owner plans to start selling two fuels made from plants: ethanol and biodiesel. In New Jersey, a group of farmers and other investors is on the verge of buying land in Gloucester County to build an ethanol factory. And in Kensington, a research-scale facility is under construction that would make biodiesel from the grease of Philly cheesesteaks and other fatty victuals. Long a common practice in the Midwestern farm belt, the use of "biofuels" is now beginning in earnest on the East Coast, with a healthy nudge in the energy bill signed yesterday by President Bush.
NEWS
November 17, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Projects to charge electric cars, fuel vehicles that run on natural gas, and promote biofuels received a $7.9 million boost from the state Tuesday. Gov. Rendell announced that amount in state grants for 21 projects, which he said also would create 221 jobs and cut carbon dioxide emissions by 14.5 million pounds. Additional private funds to finish the projects boost their value to $30 million, he said. "These are exciting projects because they pave the way for consumers to adopt these new technologies," Rendell said at a news conference in Harrisburg.
NEWS
September 24, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
The documentary "Fuel" probes sustainable energy, but with an approach that does not appear to be sustainable itself. One of its first talking heads is none other than dismissed green czar Van Jones, who recently claimed he didn't know that a petition he'd signed extolled our government's involvement in 9/11. Jones resigned anyway, thus demonstrating there is such a thing as Truther Consequences (I apologize for this obscure joke, as I realize anyone old enough to remember the origin of the pun has forgotten said origin)
NEWS
December 4, 1997 | By David E. Wilson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The elementary school district here soon will be the first in the nation to run half of its school bus fleet on biodiesel, a cleaner-burning soybean-based fuel, state officials announced yesterday. Already, five of the district's 40 yellow buses are running on the blend of soy beans and fossil fuel, which its producers said releases one-third less carbon dioxide, particulate matter and other emissions than standard diesel fuel. An additional 15 buses will be outfitted by January.
NEWS
July 5, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Zach Carson is barefoot and covered in grease, wearing a tank top patched together with duct tape. A busted alternator and an old diesel filter sit among other debris in front of his parents' Main Line house. Parked at the curb is something that looks as if it might once have been a community shuttle bus. Only now, the seats have been ripped out, replaced by a faded beige couch, a rainbow-colored hammock, and four 55-gallon drums. An extra fuel-intake pipe juts from one side of the vehicle, which is painted a wild shade of green.
NEWS
June 29, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To Mayor Bill Pikolycky, Woodbine's old landfill has been a big headache. Closed for decades, the 45-acre property is covered with scruffy vegetation and needs an environmental cleanup that would cost the tiny Cape May County borough millions of dollars. The site began to look like an opportunity, however, after the mayor heard Andrew Greene's unusual proposal. Greene sees the landfill as a prime location for Garden State Ethanol, a $200 million biofuel plant that would use more than 100 bioreactor tanks to convert algae into ethanol and biodiesel oil. And Pikolycky sees the venture as a way to generate tax income and jobs and to have the site remediated at no expense to the borough.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Sage Piszek heard that the first barrel of used cooking oil was full, he was puzzled. Already? Maybe rain had somehow seeped in. But when he checked, it was full ... of oil. That told Piszek that the project in South Philadelphia's Indonesian community, the first of its kind in the region, was working. On Tuesday, officials - including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's regional administrator - and community members gathered for a ceremonial pump-out of that first barrel.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Sage Piszek heard that the first barrel of used cooking oil was full, he was puzzled. Already? Maybe rain had somehow seeped in. But when he checked, it was full ... of oil. That told Piszek that the project in South Philadelphia's Indonesian community, the first of its kind in the region, was working. On Tuesday, officials - including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's regional administrator - and community members gathered for a ceremonial pump-out of that first barrel.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Andrew Taylor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Senate's tax-writing panel voted to renew dozens of tax breaks for businesses like biodiesel and wind energy producers, even as the GOP-controlled House passed symbolic legislation to erase them and create a new tax code with lower rates and fewer special-interest tax breaks. The $200 billion-plus package was approved by the Senate Finance Committee Thursday on a bipartisan 19-5 vote. It was anchored by a two-year provision to protect middle- and upper-income taxpayers from being hit by the alternative minimum tax, shielding them from higher levies originally meant to prevent the rich from escaping taxes altogether.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
Charles Allison Jr. is CEO of CWBiofuels in New York and a member of the Partnership for a New American Economy The level of uncertainty and despair stemming from Washington makes it hard to be optimistic about our nation's future. Three years into the recession, jobs have still not come back, and to many, the future still looks bleak. But Congress can change that outlook. It can put America back on the road to job creation. And the necessary steps do not require large capital investment, new spending, or higher taxes.
NEWS
November 17, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Projects to charge electric cars, fuel vehicles that run on natural gas, and promote biofuels received a $7.9 million boost from the state Tuesday. Gov. Rendell announced that amount in state grants for 21 projects, which he said also would create 221 jobs and cut carbon dioxide emissions by 14.5 million pounds. Additional private funds to finish the projects boost their value to $30 million, he said. "These are exciting projects because they pave the way for consumers to adopt these new technologies," Rendell said at a news conference in Harrisburg.
NEWS
September 24, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
The documentary "Fuel" probes sustainable energy, but with an approach that does not appear to be sustainable itself. One of its first talking heads is none other than dismissed green czar Van Jones, who recently claimed he didn't know that a petition he'd signed extolled our government's involvement in 9/11. Jones resigned anyway, thus demonstrating there is such a thing as Truther Consequences (I apologize for this obscure joke, as I realize anyone old enough to remember the origin of the pun has forgotten said origin)
NEWS
June 29, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To Mayor Bill Pikolycky, Woodbine's old landfill has been a big headache. Closed for decades, the 45-acre property is covered with scruffy vegetation and needs an environmental cleanup that would cost the tiny Cape May County borough millions of dollars. The site began to look like an opportunity, however, after the mayor heard Andrew Greene's unusual proposal. Greene sees the landfill as a prime location for Garden State Ethanol, a $200 million biofuel plant that would use more than 100 bioreactor tanks to convert algae into ethanol and biodiesel oil. And Pikolycky sees the venture as a way to generate tax income and jobs and to have the site remediated at no expense to the borough.
NEWS
July 6, 2008 | By Shawn Piatek, JOHNSTOWN TRIBUNE-DEMOCRAT
JOHNSTOWN, Pa. - Every business looks for a trademark, and Matthew Danchanko has spent five years toiling to make quality the mark of his general contracting company in Johnstown. But since last week, the most discernible quality of Danchanko Inc. might be that its dump truck smells like french fries. With diesel costs climbing locally to nearly $4.90 a gallon, Danchanko began researching biodiesel and invested about $3,500 in the equipment and supplies he needed. Biodiesel is made through a process of straining used cooking oil - procured from restaurants for a small fee - that is mixed with select additives.
NEWS
December 13, 2007 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
Starting in the new year, students across Chester County may notice a difference in what's coming out of the exhaust pipes of their school buses. The smoke will look a little cleaner, and the acrid diesel smell will be replaced by a more pleasant odor, like French fries. Beginning in 2008, buses for the Coatesville Area, Downingtown Area, Kennett Consolidated and West Chester Area School Districts and the Chester County Intermediate Unit will no longer run on diesel gas. Instead, it will be replaced by environmentally friendly biodiesel.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Of all the raw sources of experimental "green" energy, the stuff that comes into a tiny Kensington plant is perhaps the nastiest: a brown sludge clotted with food and other goo you really don't want to know about, laced with grease. A few treatment tanks and chemical processes later, out comes a strange brew, indeed. It is clear and smells slightly herbal. The latest biodiesel innovation - processed restaurant "trap grease" - keeps Cory Suter's white Volkswagen pickup running.
NEWS
June 14, 2007 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They are 14 young people, spending the summer traveling across the country with a mission: learning and raising awareness about environmental and American Indian issues. Their first stop: Philadelphia. The activists, aged 21 to 25, rolled up to the Fairmount Park Visitors Center adjacent to Love Park in Center City yesterday on a biodiesel-powered bus to spread the word about conservation. All are recipients of Morris K. Udall Scholarships, named for the late senator from Arizona, who was an advocate of environmentalism and the interests of American Indians.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|