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Biology

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NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Was it only three years ago that Radar Magazine crowned Drexel University the "ugliest campus" in a roundup of American colleges? The charge seemed a bit unfair then, even if Market Street was still ablaze with Drexel's orange-brick relics. But it's clearly wrong today. Driven by the revved-up agenda of its late president, Constantine Papadakis, Drexel has cleaned up nicely in the last few years. The university has added several distinctive dormitories, camouflaged its orange-brick gym with a gossamer glass wall, and brought an important building by Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown into the campus fold.
NEWS
April 24, 2011
Gary K. Beauchamp is director and president of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, where he explores topics related to taste, olfaction, and chemesthesis 'Hey, Mom, pass the brussels sprouts, please. " What parent wouldn't like to hear that? Yet no matter how many times children - or adults - are told we need to consume more healthy foods and avoid foods high in sugar, salt, and fat, we show no inclination to change our behavior. Why? Scientists believe that the main reason rests on the biological imperatives that underlie human food likes and dislikes.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | By Robert S. Boyd, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Two years ago, on the sunny patio of the Town and Country Hotel in San Diego, two medical scientists from the chilly north decided to join forces to track down a mysterious gene that kills thousands of children every year. At that meeting, Dr. Francis Collins of the University of Michigan and Dr. L.C. Tsui of the Toronto Hospital for Sick Children began a scientific treasure hunt that ended in spectacular triumph this summer. Their discovery of the cystic fibrosis gene is bringing fresh hope to 30,000 young Americans afflicted with the most common birth defect in this country.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
OVERBROOK HIGH School has not had a biology-certified teacher since September. The 129 students enrolled in biology, instead, have seen their teachers reassigned, classes changed and little instruction in the biology lab since the fall for a course that is a state requirement for high school graduation. And the biology-certified teacher set to begin today at Overbrook, according to a school district official who spoke earlier this week to Philadelphia magazine, has rejected an offer to teach at the school, the district confirmed yesterday.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael I. Mote, 80, of Philadelphia, a retired biology professor at Temple University, died Monday, June 8, of pneumonia at Chestnut Hill Hospital. Dr. Mote had a lifelong passion for - and commitment to - scientific research and student learning. Born in San Francisco, he earned a bachelor's degree from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1958; a master's degree from San Francisco State College in 1963; and a doctorate from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1968.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | By Christine Hausman, Special to The Inquirer
Springfield School District parents are not happy with the administration's decision to drop advanced biology and three computer classes at Springfield Senior High School, and they made it known at the school board meeting Monday night. The parents said they feared that the changes would jeopardize the quality of education. "I did not even know I was going to enter the field of biology and would have never known it if the opportunity hadn't been available in high school," Pam Davis, a 1984 Springfield graduate, said.
NEWS
December 22, 1993 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Louis S. Marks, 76, retired biology professor, former department chairman at St. Joseph's University and a skilled genealogist, died of colon cancer Monday at Lankenau Hospital. Born and raised in New York City, Dr. Marks graduated from City College in 1939 with a degree in chemistry. He earned a master's degree (1951) and doctorate (1954) in biology at Fordham University. During World War II, he served with the 48th Academic Squadron of the Army Air Force, teaching servicemen how to use radar, a new invention at the time.
NEWS
November 18, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John S. Penny, 91, of Chalfont, a former La Salle University department chairman who beautified the campus with Japanese cherry trees, died of Alzheimer's disease Nov. 7 at home. For almost 30 years, Dr. Penny taught biology at La Salle, and he was chairman of the department for several years in the 1960s. He also helped manage the school's pre-med program, said John Daly, a La Salle graduate who is dean of Temple University's School of Medicine. "When he finished with you," Daly said, "you were virtually assured a place in medical school.
NEWS
May 9, 1997 | By Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The weather is warm. The sky is sunny. And near the end of another long school day - and the end of another long school year at South Philadelphia High School, the subject in teacher Don Snyder's biology class is vertebrates. Forget all those Latin phrases in Snyder's biology books. This time of year, a lot of 10th graders are concerned with one of their own: Cutticus Classicus. But, no, Snyder's class is full of 16-year-olds hunched over textbooks, staring into formaldehyde-filled jars, feverishly jotting down polysyllabic scientific names.
NEWS
June 10, 2009 | By Thomas A. Marino
In recent weeks, State Sens. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery) and John Eichelberger (R., Blair) entered the fray with attempts to legislate how couples in Pennsylvania ought to live their lives. The senators seem to think their job is to tell people whether they can marry or not. But it is not their job, and, even if it were, they would not be able to do it. No matter what they do to ban or legalize same-sex marriage, there is no way to reliably enforce such a law. The problem revolves around three questions: What do they mean by sex?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael I. Mote, 80, of Philadelphia, a retired biology professor at Temple University, died Monday, June 8, of pneumonia at Chestnut Hill Hospital. Dr. Mote had a lifelong passion for - and commitment to - scientific research and student learning. Born in San Francisco, he earned a bachelor's degree from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1958; a master's degree from San Francisco State College in 1963; and a doctorate from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1968.
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raushaun Williams started reading at age 3, and at 4 took an IQ test that identified him as gifted. But in the classroom, he was restless, and when he started kindergarten, he was regularly suspended. Several years and schools later, family and teachers point to the West Philadelphia teenager, now 16, as a role model for his upward academic trajectory. The Roman Catholic High School graduate is headed to Drexel University, where he intends to study biology this fall on a full scholarship.
NEWS
June 19, 2015
"IMITATION OF LIFE" is one of my favorite movies. I always put aside whatever else I'm doing when it comes on TCM, and settle in for what I know will be a monumental crying session during the last scene. It's the one where a young black woman who's been "passing" as white shows up at her mother's funeral just as the hearse is pulling away from the church. She throws herself on the flower-covered casket and screams, "I'm so sorry, Mama!" Her wails are the sound that a wounded animal would make.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles H. Gray, 85, of Mount Airy, a biology teacher and owner of the Rib Crib, a barbecue spot in Germantown that became a Philadelphia landmark, died Wednesday, May 6, at Einstein Medical Center after a series of strokes. Since opening the restaurant 47 years ago, Mr. Gray had played host to such figures as former President Bill Clinton, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, the actors Denzel Washington and Tom Hanks, and the singer Patti LaBelle. Neither they nor the locals who lined up on the sidewalk outside the restaurant at 6333 Germantown Ave. could get enough of his sizzling-hot baby back ribs with homemade sauce - or of Mr. Gray.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SOME PEOPLE dream of sun-kissed beaches or mountains in the moonlight or other pleasant scenes. Charles Gray dreamt of a barbecue pit. You see, Charles, a longtime biology teacher in Philadelphia schools, had this vision: a barbecue restaurant so outstanding that it would become a Philly landmark and draw celebrities, politicians, and other movers and shakers to its precincts. Struggling through problems attendant to starting a new business - such as lack of money - Charles finally realized his vision.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the first day of the spring Keystone exams, some Philadelphia high school students walked out while others "opted out" of the tests that soon will be required to graduate. "It's important to fight against standardized tests," said Gian Carlos Rodriguez, 16, a sophomore at Penn Treaty High School in Fishtown, who identified himself as an organizer of the Wednesday protest. "Some people are bad test-takers. " About a dozen students showed up at Kensington High School for the Creative and Performing Arts, then left the building while the test was being administered first thing in the morning, principal Lisette Agosto said.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
OVERBROOK HIGH School has not had a biology-certified teacher since September. The 129 students enrolled in biology, instead, have seen their teachers reassigned, classes changed and little instruction in the biology lab since the fall for a course that is a state requirement for high school graduation. And the biology-certified teacher set to begin today at Overbrook, according to a school district official who spoke earlier this week to Philadelphia magazine, has rejected an offer to teach at the school, the district confirmed yesterday.
NEWS
January 24, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Loretta Dittrich Spotila began her career as a nutritionist at nursing homes in Buffalo, N.Y., and then taught nutrition at the State University of New York in Buffalo. But she wanted to do more, said her husband, James R. Spotila, Betz chair and professor of environmental science at Drexel University. "She was trying to find the mechanisms of how disease works, and she thought molecular biology would give her a handle to look for those mechanisms," said her husband, whom she married in 1967.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Holtzer, 92, of West Philadelphia, a longtime professor and researcher in cell and developmental biology at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, died Wednesday, Nov. 5, at his home. Dr. Holtzer remained active in his research at Penn until a few years before his death. He is survived by his wife and research collaborator of 64 years, Sybil Holtzer. His research into the ways cells communicate was described as groundbreaking. "While doing research in the laboratory of Dr. Paul Weiss in Chicago, he did his first extraordinary experiments and made observations that historically are the foundation of much of the molecular work on inductive signals between tissues and how cells communicate during development," said Bernice J. Koplin, his estate lawyer.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brother Nicholas Sullivan, 86, of Lincroft, N.J., a researcher, explorer, and former professor at La Salle University, died of kidney failure Saturday, Oct. 4, at De La Salle Hall, a nursing facility in Lincroft. Brother Nicholas traveled around the world to study cave formations, and participated in a study that examined the environmental impact of the Alaska pipeline. When Brother Nicholas taught La Salle students about the geology of Alaska, his lab was the 49th state. He and his students traveled from their Olney campus to the Last Frontier during six summers starting in the 1960s.
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