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Biology

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NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Was it only three years ago that Radar Magazine crowned Drexel University the "ugliest campus" in a roundup of American colleges? The charge seemed a bit unfair then, even if Market Street was still ablaze with Drexel's orange-brick relics. But it's clearly wrong today. Driven by the revved-up agenda of its late president, Constantine Papadakis, Drexel has cleaned up nicely in the last few years. The university has added several distinctive dormitories, camouflaged its orange-brick gym with a gossamer glass wall, and brought an important building by Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown into the campus fold.
NEWS
April 24, 2011
Gary K. Beauchamp is director and president of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, where he explores topics related to taste, olfaction, and chemesthesis 'Hey, Mom, pass the brussels sprouts, please. " What parent wouldn't like to hear that? Yet no matter how many times children - or adults - are told we need to consume more healthy foods and avoid foods high in sugar, salt, and fat, we show no inclination to change our behavior. Why? Scientists believe that the main reason rests on the biological imperatives that underlie human food likes and dislikes.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | By Robert S. Boyd, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Two years ago, on the sunny patio of the Town and Country Hotel in San Diego, two medical scientists from the chilly north decided to join forces to track down a mysterious gene that kills thousands of children every year. At that meeting, Dr. Francis Collins of the University of Michigan and Dr. L.C. Tsui of the Toronto Hospital for Sick Children began a scientific treasure hunt that ended in spectacular triumph this summer. Their discovery of the cystic fibrosis gene is bringing fresh hope to 30,000 young Americans afflicted with the most common birth defect in this country.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
OVERBROOK HIGH School has not had a biology-certified teacher since September. The 129 students enrolled in biology, instead, have seen their teachers reassigned, classes changed and little instruction in the biology lab since the fall for a course that is a state requirement for high school graduation. And the biology-certified teacher set to begin today at Overbrook, according to a school district official who spoke earlier this week to Philadelphia magazine, has rejected an offer to teach at the school, the district confirmed yesterday.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | By Christine Hausman, Special to The Inquirer
Springfield School District parents are not happy with the administration's decision to drop advanced biology and three computer classes at Springfield Senior High School, and they made it known at the school board meeting Monday night. The parents said they feared that the changes would jeopardize the quality of education. "I did not even know I was going to enter the field of biology and would have never known it if the opportunity hadn't been available in high school," Pam Davis, a 1984 Springfield graduate, said.
NEWS
December 22, 1993 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Louis S. Marks, 76, retired biology professor, former department chairman at St. Joseph's University and a skilled genealogist, died of colon cancer Monday at Lankenau Hospital. Born and raised in New York City, Dr. Marks graduated from City College in 1939 with a degree in chemistry. He earned a master's degree (1951) and doctorate (1954) in biology at Fordham University. During World War II, he served with the 48th Academic Squadron of the Army Air Force, teaching servicemen how to use radar, a new invention at the time.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael I. Mote, 80, of Philadelphia, a retired biology professor at Temple University, died Monday, June 8, of pneumonia at Chestnut Hill Hospital. Dr. Mote had a lifelong passion for - and commitment to - scientific research and student learning. Born in San Francisco, he earned a bachelor's degree from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1958; a master's degree from San Francisco State College in 1963; and a doctorate from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1968.
NEWS
November 18, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John S. Penny, 91, of Chalfont, a former La Salle University department chairman who beautified the campus with Japanese cherry trees, died of Alzheimer's disease Nov. 7 at home. For almost 30 years, Dr. Penny taught biology at La Salle, and he was chairman of the department for several years in the 1960s. He also helped manage the school's pre-med program, said John Daly, a La Salle graduate who is dean of Temple University's School of Medicine. "When he finished with you," Daly said, "you were virtually assured a place in medical school.
NEWS
May 9, 1997 | By Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The weather is warm. The sky is sunny. And near the end of another long school day - and the end of another long school year at South Philadelphia High School, the subject in teacher Don Snyder's biology class is vertebrates. Forget all those Latin phrases in Snyder's biology books. This time of year, a lot of 10th graders are concerned with one of their own: Cutticus Classicus. But, no, Snyder's class is full of 16-year-olds hunched over textbooks, staring into formaldehyde-filled jars, feverishly jotting down polysyllabic scientific names.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
In 1992, John A. DiFiori, a retired South Philadelphia High School biology teacher, rode his bicycle from Manhattan Beach, Calif., to Revere, Mass., as part of an annual seven-week group event, Pedal for Power Across America. The former League of American Wheelmen ran the tour as a fund-raising event, with Mr. DiFiori cycling for an environmental program at his former school. He had retired in 1991, the year he turned 59, but long-distance cycling had been in his bones for years.
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BUSINESS
August 23, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Latest in an occasional series about recruiters When the big gong sounds at Klein Hersh, it means an oncologist or tumor immunologist or gene-therapy researcher will soon have a new job. And, likely as not, it will be a job in some other city. "Talent is being incubated here, and then it's leaving," said Jason Hersh, a managing partner at the Horsham recruiting firm started by family friends. They were the ones who instituted the morale-boosting sounding of a big Chinese gong when a recruiter found the right person to fill a company's hiring needs.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
In 1992, John A. DiFiori, a retired South Philadelphia High School biology teacher, rode his bicycle from Manhattan Beach, Calif., to Revere, Mass., as part of an annual seven-week group event, Pedal for Power Across America. The former League of American Wheelmen ran the tour as a fund-raising event, with Mr. DiFiori cycling for an environmental program at his former school. He had retired in 1991, the year he turned 59, but long-distance cycling had been in his bones for years.
NEWS
May 25, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
A Cabrini College professor died when he was hit by a car as he tried to cross Lancaster Avenue in Wayne during a downpour Saturday, police said. David Dunbar, 51, of Exeter Township, Berks County, was hit after leaving the Anthony Wayne movie theater near Lancaster and Wayne Avenues about 9 p.m., authorities said. Dunbar did not attempt to cross at the corner crosswalk, Radnor Township Police Lt. Chris Flanagan said. The driver, who remained at the scene, did not see Dunbar in time to stop, Flanagan said.
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
The most gut-clenching, psyche-rattling moment of Margee Kerr's 36 years on this planet came when she was 116 stories in the air above it, strapped into a harness so she could lean out from the top of Toronto's CN Tower. For Kerr, it was partly an academic experience. She studies fear for a living, and will speak about her work Wednesday night at the Franklin Institute, as part of Philadelphia's annual nine-day science festival. Thus far, attendees have been gazing at stars, digging up fossils, exploring colonial-era medicine, and solving murder mysteries.
NEWS
February 24, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Sister Maria del Carmen Kuhn, 95, a teacher and administrator, died of complications from a stroke Monday, Feb. 15, at McAuley Convent in Merion. A Sister of Mercy for 75 years, she taught biology and later was director of guidance at several high schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Sister Maria formerly was known as Catherine Kuhn. She grew up in the close-knit neighborhood of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish in South Philadelphia. She graduated from John W. Hallahan Catholic High School for Girls in 1938 and worked as a secretary until joining the Sisters of Mercy in 1940.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Swarthmore College's new president has a plan for dealing with a student body known for its vocal activism: Listen carefully to the students. Craft a careful, well-researched response. Communicate with them. "It's critically important to maintain open dialogue with students," said Valerie Smith, 59, who on Saturday was inaugurated as the first African American president of Swarthmore, one of the most prestigious and selective colleges in the country. Smith, an English and African American studies scholar who formerly served as dean of the college at Princeton University, took over at the 1,500-student college in July, replacing Rebecca Chopp, who now heads the University of Denver.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I have recently begun a relationship with my biological father, "Frank," after not seeing him since I was 4. My mother and stepfather raised me and I am very close to them. But after talking to Frank and meeting him face to face, I have gotten close to him as well. His relationship with Mom ended badly. They were very young and he takes all the blame. Mom has always said that if I have a relationship with Frank, she wants no part of it. After I told her I have been talking to him for two years, she became upset and has been short with me and my wife ever since.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael I. Mote, 80, of Philadelphia, a retired biology professor at Temple University, died Monday, June 8, of pneumonia at Chestnut Hill Hospital. Dr. Mote had a lifelong passion for - and commitment to - scientific research and student learning. Born in San Francisco, he earned a bachelor's degree from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1958; a master's degree from San Francisco State College in 1963; and a doctorate from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1968.
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raushaun Williams started reading at age 3, and at 4 took an IQ test that identified him as gifted. But in the classroom, he was restless, and when he started kindergarten, he was regularly suspended. Several years and schools later, family and teachers point to the West Philadelphia teenager, now 16, as a role model for his upward academic trajectory. The Roman Catholic High School graduate is headed to Drexel University, where he intends to study biology this fall on a full scholarship.
NEWS
June 19, 2015
"IMITATION OF LIFE" is one of my favorite movies. I always put aside whatever else I'm doing when it comes on TCM, and settle in for what I know will be a monumental crying session during the last scene. It's the one where a young black woman who's been "passing" as white shows up at her mother's funeral just as the hearse is pulling away from the church. She throws herself on the flower-covered casket and screams, "I'm so sorry, Mama!" Her wails are the sound that a wounded animal would make.
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