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Biomedical Research

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NEWS
July 2, 2001 | By Elizabeth O'Brien
In passing legislation to distribute the Commonwealth's share of proceeds from the tobacco settlement, Gov. Ridge and Pennsylvania's state legislature vaulted to the fore nationally in their support for biomedical research. Nineteen percent of the settlement proceeds, or roughly $65 million dollars annually, will be used to fund medical research at academic institutions and research centers statewide. Some of these funds will support a new research-grant program administered by the Department of Health, while the lion's share will flow directly to research institutions to enhance infrastructure and expand scientific staff and programs.
NEWS
November 16, 1993 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's one thing to read about genetics and biotechnology in a textbook. It's quite another to see DNA research being conducted on cells. Just ask the advanced placement biology students from Conestoga High School, who spent a day in the lab at the Lankenau Medical Research Facility recently. The students watched intently - then let out a chorus of oohs and aahs - as research technician Lisa Young tapped open a chicken embryo and removed its beating heart to study heart-muscle cells.
NEWS
October 21, 1997 | By Clay Scott
People may not appreciate the long-term struggles inherent in this business just to come up with a single successful drug. We're talking about years of research in one area with the goal of producing one entity at the end, against odds of somewhere around one in 10,000 compounds. Success means your work can have a major impact on the quality of life for a great number of people. That's big in my book. In school, you take science classes and do the experiments based on what the teacher tells you to do. The answer is known, and the teacher can weigh your performance based on whether you get that known answer.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2001 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A group of local college students got a head start on promising careers as they became the first class to graduate from the pilot Biomedical Technician Training Program at the Wistar Institute on Thursday. The two-year program, a collaboration of the Wistar Institute, an independent nonprofit biomedical research center on the University of Pennsylvania campus, and Community College of Philadelphia, trains students for careers as research technicians in area laboratories. The program included work as research assistants at Wistar.
NEWS
February 22, 2013
By J. Larry Jameson As a scientist and leader of an academic medical center, I call on Congress to approach proposed debt-reduction negotiations by trimming with a scalpel rather than a saw. Blunt cuts will have life-threatening consequences and dampen the tremendous economic benefits of the biomedical research engine. The pace of biomedical research is accelerating. Examples of recent breakthroughs at Penn Medicine underscore why we should be apprehensive about losing research momentum.
NEWS
November 7, 2007 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
In a stunning blow to Gov. Corzine's plan to turn New Jersey into a national leader in biomedical research, voters yesterday refused to approve $450 million in grants for stem-cell research. Voters also defeated a measure favored by the Democratically controlled Legislature to set aside a half-cent of last year's penny sales-tax increase for property-tax relief. It was the first time in 17 years that Garden State voters defeated ballot initiatives. Election returns remained incomplete late last night but observers said the apparent defeat of both measures appeared linked to voter fatigue with the fiscal woes of one of the most heavily taxed states in America.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
National Institutes of Health director Francis Collins reminded biotech executives Wednesday in Philadelphia that the big money they hope to make from drugs, medical devices, and other health care technology often starts with the taxpayers. "NIH is the largest supporter of biomedical research in the world," Collins told a packed conference room at the BIO International 2015 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. He then cautioned them about the political and economic realities of America.
NEWS
December 22, 1986 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Vincent Cristofalo had no more than begun his spiel about his research on aging than the cameraman started waving his arms and muttering something in Hungarian. He muttered in Hungarian because he was Hungarian, which meant that Cristofalo had no idea what he was talking about. "Oh, oh, the glare, my glasses," said Cristofalo, finally recognizing the international gesture for "remove your glasses. " So it went for most of last week at the Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, as a five-member crew from Hungarian television visited the University of Pennsylvania campus to film a 45-minute documentary on the independent, world-renowned biomedical research center.
NEWS
May 12, 2004
Most Americans who have heard of the National Institutes of Health probably regard them with awe and respect. The NIH is a powerhouse of biomedical research, made up of 27 separate institutes and centers working constantly to discover or fund breakthroughs in areas ranging from cancer to deafness to genome research. With a budget of $28 billion and 18,000 employes, the NIH is rightly called the world's crown jewel of medical research But beneath that glossy surface, the NIH is beset by an ugly controversy.
NEWS
November 7, 2007 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
In a stunning blow to Gov. Corzine's plan to turn New Jersey into a national leader in biomedical research, voters yesterday refused to approve $450 million in grants for stem-cell research. Voters also defeated a measure favored by the Democratically controlled Legislature to set aside a half-cent of last year's penny sales-tax increase for property-tax relief. It was the first time in 17 years that Garden State voters defeated ballot initiatives. Election returns remained incomplete late last night but observers said the apparent defeat of both measures appeared linked to voter fatigue with the fiscal woes of one of the most heavily taxed states in America.
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NEWS
September 13, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Every year in the United States, an estimated 400,000 people die from preventable medical errors. When Leslie D. Michelson cites that figure, he - like many patient-safety experts - translates it into aviation terms. "That's the equivalent of two fully loaded jumbo jets crashing every single day with no survivors," he says. Michelson had an early start in helping prevent medical errors. He was a teenager when his father came home one day and announced his physician had told him he needed open-heart surgery or he would die. The boy couldn't believe it. So he called the only hospital he knew of and asked to speak to the head of cardiology.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
National Institutes of Health director Francis Collins reminded biotech executives Wednesday in Philadelphia that the big money they hope to make from drugs, medical devices, and other health care technology often starts with the taxpayers. "NIH is the largest supporter of biomedical research in the world," Collins told a packed conference room at the BIO International 2015 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. He then cautioned them about the political and economic realities of America.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A father came to visit ophthalmology researcher Jean Bennett last week to talk about his son, who is swiftly going blind. Her clinical trial of a one-time injection to cure the inherited disease is scheduled to begin in July. " 'If this was your son, wouldn't you just take him into your basement and inject him? Why do we have to wait this long?' " Bennett recalled his saying. She added: "I haven't even told him that it could be delayed. " These are the kinds of stories that scientists tell about how events in Washington - stagnant appropriations followed by sequestration, the government shutdown, and now negotiations on future budget cuts to avoid another crisis early next year - affect them.
NEWS
August 28, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A central Pennsylvania man was sentenced to six months in prison Monday for his role in a years-long scheme involving illegal dog trafficking for medical research. Floyd Martin and his wife, Susan Martin, pleaded guilty in March in federal court for their role in fraudulently obtaining hundreds of pets for some of the nation's largest hospitals and research facilities over a five-year period. "You gamed the system not once but many times, wantonly, deliberately for great financial gain," said U.S. District Judge John E. Jones III told Floyd Martin during sentencing Monday.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG — They were known as "random source" dog dealers. They bought their animals by the hundreds from shady individuals known as "bunchers," who collect dogs from auctions, shelters, the street, theft, and "free to good home" pet ads. Then, prosecutors say, the dealers sold the dogs to some of the nation's leading medical institutions. Floyd and Susan Martin of Shippensburg were part of a federally sanctioned yet controversial method of procuring animals for medical research, known as Class B or "random source" dog dealers.
NEWS
February 22, 2013
By J. Larry Jameson As a scientist and leader of an academic medical center, I call on Congress to approach proposed debt-reduction negotiations by trimming with a scalpel rather than a saw. Blunt cuts will have life-threatening consequences and dampen the tremendous economic benefits of the biomedical research engine. The pace of biomedical research is accelerating. Examples of recent breakthroughs at Penn Medicine underscore why we should be apprehensive about losing research momentum.
NEWS
December 26, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
Chimps are about 96 percent genetically identical to humans, and like us they are self-aware enough to recognize themselves in a mirror. But physically, we show some remarkable differences. They don't get the same kind of heart disease humans get. They develop some of the brain abnormalities associated with Alzheimer's disease, but not others. And despite being more sexually promiscuous than humans, they don't get the same sexually transmitted diseases. They heal better than we do and don't get sleep apnea, hemorrhoids, varicose veins, or acne.
NEWS
November 7, 2007 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
In a stunning blow to Gov. Corzine's plan to turn New Jersey into a national leader in biomedical research, voters yesterday refused to approve $450 million in grants for stem-cell research. Voters also defeated a measure favored by the Democratically controlled Legislature to set aside a half-cent of last year's penny sales-tax increase for property-tax relief. It was the first time in 17 years that Garden State voters defeated ballot initiatives. Election returns remained incomplete late last night but observers said the apparent defeat of both measures appeared linked to voter fatigue with the fiscal woes of one of the most heavily taxed states in America.
NEWS
November 7, 2007 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
In a stunning blow to Gov. Corzine's plan to turn New Jersey into a national leader in biomedical research, voters yesterday refused to approve $450 million in grants for stem-cell research. Voters also defeated a measure favored by the Democratically controlled Legislature to set aside a half-cent of last year's penny sales-tax increase for property-tax relief. It was the first time in 17 years that Garden State voters defeated ballot initiatives. Election returns remained incomplete late last night but observers said the apparent defeat of both measures appeared linked to voter fatigue with the fiscal woes of one of the most heavily taxed states in America.
NEWS
December 13, 2005 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Legislation that would place a $350 million bond proposal for stem-cell research on the ballot in November was approved by a Senate panel yesterday, positioning the bill for a vote by the full house this lame-duck legislative session. The proposal is a compromise between acting Gov. Richard J. Codey, who proposed a $230 million bond referendum for stem-cell research grants in his State of the State address in January, and Assemblyman Neil Cohen (D., Union), who advocated that the state spend $500 million.
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