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Bipartisanship

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NEWS
September 21, 1994 | by Bob Dole, New York Times
The last few months haven't been the best for Congress. The hours have been long, the debates contentious. And the American people seem to respect the Congress and its members less and less. Now some people are suggesting that if Congress could just exercise a little more "bipartisanship," America would be better served and the public would hold us in higher regard. I disagree. When principles coincide, bipartisanship should prevail. But sacrificing principles will neither be good for America nor good for our government.
NEWS
November 30, 2011
By Ben Dworkin With the latest fight over the federal budget having ended without an agreement, some pundits and commentators are insisting that only the 2012 elections will determine the answer to the question at the heart of our disagreements: What is the proper role of government in our lives? But there is a more fundamental question at the center of our current debates: How do we understand politics? The failure of the congressional supercommittee revealed a deep divide. On one side are the traditionalists, who believe that politics is at its core about bargaining, negotiation, and compromise, all of which are needed to arrive at a majority and pass something.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | By Christopher Buckley
"The American people returned to office a president of one party and a Congress of another. Surely they did not do this to advance the politics of petty bickering and extreme partisanship . . . No, they call all of us instead to be repairers of the breach. " - President Clinton, 1997 "The meekness of Quakerism will do in religion, but not in politics. " - De Witt Clinton, 1803 President Clinton has a touch of the preacher in him, and the thought of binding our wounds with malice toward none was probably harder to resist than a Krispy Kreme doughnut.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | By E.J. Dionne Jr
The word "bipartisanship" and the phrase "govern from the political center" are being used so promiscuously in this post-election holiday season that they carry all the meaning and sincerity of those old "Have a Nice Day" bumper stickers. No, there's nothing inherently wrong with bipartisanship. Governing from the center can be an excellent way to go, depending on who gets to define where the center is. That's the trouble. George W. Bush prepared for his presidency with a visit to the Capitol on yesterday in the midst of a lot of forced happy talk.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | By Larry Eichel
George W. Bush has given three major speeches since his election was assured. On each occasion, he's stressed his desire to change the tone in Washington and foster bipartisan cooperation. It turns out that those two goals - the new tone and enhanced bipartisanship - aren't one and the same, at least not in his mind. He's delivering on the one but not the other. The President has done a skillful job of making the nation's capital seem less rancorous, what with his willingness to meet with all comers and his eagerness to bestow endearing nicknames on friend and foe alike.
NEWS
July 11, 2001 | By E.J. Dionne Jr
Who says bipartisanship is dead? Over the next week or so, a bipartisan coalition will decide the fate of a bill to begin fixing our wretched campaign money system. But because both the pro-reform and the anti-reform forces are bipartisan, the question is: Which coalition? Bipartisanship is supposed to mean peace, comity, civility. But this issue shows that bipartisan and intrapartisan attacks can be at least as nasty as the partisan kind. Just ask Sen. John McCain, the maverick pro-reform Republican from Arizona.
NEWS
October 28, 2002
What do you know, Joe? Joe, as in U.S. Rep. Joseph M. Hoeffel, knows how to wage and win a tough fight. Better still, he knows how to be a solid congressman. Voters in the 13th Congressional District in Pennsylvania, which covers Northeast Philadelphia and parts of Montgomery County, should reelect JOE HOEFFEL. Mr. Hoeffel knows education and health care are two of the most important issues Congress needs to address in the coming session. He knows bipartisanship can produce good results.
NEWS
January 21, 2010
Professions of warm bipartisanship filled last week's swearing-in of New Jersey's 214th Legislature. But you didn't have to be a cynic to have doubts. You just had to wait a few hours. The august body hadn't even completed its first day of business before the bonhomie broke down. Harsh words were exchanged, motives were questioned, and business was postponed - all over a technicality. The Legislature's first minutes were auspicious enough. The new state Senate president, Democrat Stephen Sweeney of Gloucester County, vowed to work with the leader of the Republican minority, his "good friend" Tom Kean Jr., and the incoming Republican governor, Christopher J. Christie.
NEWS
February 22, 2009 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He invited them over to watch the Super Bowl, visited them in their caucus rooms on Capitol Hill, and even flew a couple of them on Air Force One. But for all the wooing, President Obama got zero Republican votes in the House and just three in the Senate for passage of his economic-stimulus legislation. Now, as he prepares to make his nationally televised first address to a joint session of Congress Tuesday night, to lay out a 2010 budget proposal expected to include a down payment on changes in the health-care system, aides say Obama will rely more on his persuasion skills to build public pressure on lawmakers than on the inside game in coming battles.
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | By DAVID S. BRODER
When NBC's Meet the Press teamed Bob Dole and Thomas S. Foley as guests, the producers must have assumed that their audience knew, without being told, that Dole is the Senate Republican leader and Foley is the Democratic speaker of the House. But nothing they said would have given you a clue to their partisanship. They agreed on everything: that President Bush is handling the Persian Gulf crisis just right; that America's allies should bear more of the costs of the mobilization against Iraq; that the United States should sell a huge amount of arms to Saudi Arabia; that Egypt's (and eventually Israel's)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
CEDAR GROVE, N.J. - Gov. Christie promoted his willingness to cross partisan divides at a town-hall meeting Thursday, two days after the state's largest teachers' union announced that it no longer would negotiate with a commission he formed to overhaul New Jersey's pension system. But after his introduction by Essex County Executive Joe DiVincenzo - a Democratic power broker who has been an ally - the Republican governor laid into Democratic legislative leaders, who this week joined a lawsuit by public-sector unions trying to compel the state to make a larger payment into the system.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna and Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writers
TRENTON - Praising a New Jersey that "put aside political partisanship" while battling economic recession and weathering Hurricane Sandy, Gov. Christie delivered an inaugural address Tuesday that emphasized compromise and resilience, with no mention of the scandal that has been a cloud over his administration in recent weeks. "We started this journey together in a dark and foreboding time in our history, when hope was at a premium and trust had been squandered by a government who had been unwilling to tell you the truth," Christie said after he was formally sworn in for a second term at the War Memorial in Trenton.
NEWS
December 20, 2013
If it weren't so painful to watch the calculated posturing of self-interested politicians, Americans might relish what occurred in Washington this week. Congress reached a bipartisan budget deal that could signal the beginning of an epic political shift that ends the tea-party movement's domination of the Republican Party. Then again, maybe not. It's too early to tell. Perhaps eager to head home for the holidays, tea-steeped lawmakers didn't drag out their fight to prevent the compromise from passing.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON With the federal government headed toward a shutdown, the reelection campaign of Gov. Christie on Monday began capitalizing on the moment to draw a contrast: Divided government in Washington has failed, but divided government in Trenton under the governor has worked. Through a new hashtag on his Twitter feed, a campaign ad launching this week , and a series of recent public appearances with prominent Democrats, the Republican governor is playing to the bipartisan inclinations of Democratic New Jersey.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - As the health-care industry and advocates for the poor anxiously watched and waited, a soft-spoken Bucks County Republican took the state House floor Monday night to break with his caucus and call for expansion of health insurance for hundreds of thousands of lower-income Pennsylvanians. "I believe in bottom of my heart that this is the right thing to do," said Rep. Gene DiGirolamo, who is chairman of the House Health and Welfare Committee, to applause from Democrats.
NEWS
April 15, 2013
Bipartisanship in Washington? A3. The case for wider background checks. Sen. Pat Toomey, D1. Gun deal passes for progress. Editorial, D4.
NEWS
January 3, 2013 | By Joshua Green
The holidays are an occasion to step back from the bustle of daily life and reflect on the year just passed. It's a time to look for the good in everyone, even the least deserving. Which brings us to Congress, an institution that doesn't elicit many warm feelings, no matter how much eggnog you've consumed. Despite all the conflict and strife, there were some important bipartisan accomplishments in 2012, which were overlooked precisely because they lacked drama. So in the spirit of the season, here are a few of them.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Gov. Christie and Democrats may be putting aside partisanship in Washington to fight for federal money to rebuild the Jersey Shore after Hurricane Sandy. But back in Trenton, the Republican governor and the Democratic Legislature have used the storm to resurrect arguments and shove them in each other's faces. All in the name of bipartisanship. On Tuesday, Assembly leaders announced a $20 million package of job-creation bills, some of which Christie previously vetoed.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | By Norma Love, Associated Press
CONCORD, N.H. - Colleagues knew former Sen. Warren B. Rudman for his abrupt manner, but they trusted his expertise. On one matter in particular, though, he wished people would have listened to him: that the United States was vulnerable to a major terrorist attack. Sen. Rudman left the Senate in the early 1990s but later led a commission that predicted the danger of terrorism on American soil just months before the attacks of Sept. 11 and called for the creation of a Department of Homeland Security.
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