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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Aaron Posner helped found the Arden Theatre Company here in 1988. He did so with Terrence J. Nolen (now producing artistic director) and Amy L. Murphy (managing director). Then, sensing it was time, he stepped away in 1998 to pursue a writing career. With Thursday's opening of Stupid F#*@king Bird - director Posner's sad and hilarious "sort of" adaptation of The Seagull by Anton Chekhov - he shows that his dramatic instincts are still much the same as when he and Nolen met at Northwestern University.
NEWS
July 28, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - One of the world's most famous fossil creatures, widely considered the earliest known bird, is getting a rude present on the 150th birthday of its discovery: A new analysis suggests it isn't a bird at all. Chinese scientists are proposing a change to the evolutionary family tree that boots Archaeopteryx off the "bird" branch and onto a closely related branch of birdlike dinosaurs. Archaeopteryx (ahr-kee-AHP'- teh-rihx) was a crow-sized creature that lived about 150 million years ago. It had wings and feathers but also quite un-birdlike traits like teeth and a bony tail.
FOOD
November 18, 1987 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
It's hard to believe, I admit, but here it is coming up on turkey time again. My covered cooker has hardly had a chance to cool and here it is the holidays. Seems like they come earlier every year. Was a time when nobody thought of Christmas until at least after Thanksgiving. Then it was Halloween that marked the beginning of the holiday season. Now it's even before that. I overheard a marketing director say to a second assistant sub-underling late last summer in a department store in Omaha "take the bikini off that mannequin will you?
NEWS
February 10, 1991 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
Australia will issue four commemoratives Thursday promoting support of four water bird species threatened by uncontrolled human incursion into wetlands. The country's wetlands have been under assault by logging, industry and pollution, a scenario familiar elsewhere, and environmentalists warn that such infringement could eliminate the four birds from the continent. Perhaps the most popular bird found in Australia and Tasmania is the black swan, depicted on a 43-cent stamp.
SPORTS
September 29, 1999 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
The Eagles yesterday signed Pemberton (N.J.) High product Ed Smith, a tight end, and released recent signee Justin Swift. Smith is 30, but has just three years of pro football experience, having spent nine years playing minor league baseball as a third baseman. The Chicago White Sox signed him out of high school. After signing with the Rams as a free agent in 1996, Smith (6-3, 268 pounds) spent 1996 and '97 on the practice squads of the Redskins and Falcons, respectively. He played about half of the '97 season with the Falcons regular squad and played 15 games and all three postseason games last year during Atlanta's Super Bowl run. The Eagles also cut tackle Greg Studdard from the practice squad.
NEWS
August 23, 2013
PHILADELPHIA's ever-growing theater scene expanded yet again Thursday night with the opening of "Bird in the Window," the first offering from the newly minted Underbite Theatre Company. The group's introduction is yet another example of the kind of DIY energy and determination that seems to inform so much of the local theatrical realm. "Bird in the Window," which runs through Aug. 31 at Queen Village's Shubin Theatre, is a drama about a college freshman who believes that someone is stalking her. It was written by Shelli Pentimall Bookler , the co-founder and artistic director of the company.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1986 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
David Saunders, former chief assistant to Red Grooms, is an interesting artist in his own right. For all the casual appearance of the assemblages in his show at the Mangel Gallery, Saunders has an unfailing ability to create memorable metaphors that suggest the eternal interplay of plant and bird life. To do this, Saunders carves a wooden aggregate in the shape of a natural habitat - complete with real-looking twigs and branches - and then places into its midst a flat, carved, painted bird in an action pose.
FOOD
May 21, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
What: Bird lemon-juicer Manufacturer: Produced in China Where: Williams-Sonoma Price: $5 This palm-sized juicer will squeeze exactly one lemon slice about 3/4 of an inch wide. It would be fun to pass a flock of these on a serving plate at an informal meal when guests might want to squeeze fresh lemon juice on fish, chicken, vegetables. Consider this juicer an alternative to the cheesecloth netting that restaurants tie around lemon halves so customers don't squirt themselves in the eye. The test.
NEWS
May 27, 2005 | By John Fitzpatrick, Scott Simon and John Bridgeland
Maybe hope does spring eternal. So endangered that most bird guides list Campephilus principalis as extinct, the ivory-billed woodpecker has now been found. For centuries, it has inspired its finders, and for six decades it has been silent. More than 100 years ago, a naturalist who saw the ivory-billed woodpecker for the first time wrote about the "majestic and wild personality of this bird, its vigor, its almost frantic aliveness. " That frantic aliveness may have helped the ivory-bill survive through the periods of greatest destruction of its habitat.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Concurrent with its retrospective of "Bay Area Figurative Art 1950-1965," the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts is hosting a film series, with variations on the theme of the Beat Movement. This Sunday's offering (free with museum admission) is Bird (1988), Clint Eastwood's jazzy biography of be-bop saxophonist Charlie Parker. Starring an impressive Forest Whitaker as the creative musician with a self-destructive bent, Bird is a snappy counterpart to the pictures in the exhibition.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Aaron Posner helped found the Arden Theatre Company here in 1988. He did so with Terrence J. Nolen (now producing artistic director) and Amy L. Murphy (managing director). Then, sensing it was time, he stepped away in 1998 to pursue a writing career. With Thursday's opening of Stupid F#*@king Bird - director Posner's sad and hilarious "sort of" adaptation of The Seagull by Anton Chekhov - he shows that his dramatic instincts are still much the same as when he and Nolen met at Northwestern University.
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
ISSUE | WIND POWER Birds, bats victimized Wind farms have one big drawback ("Hot air isn't wind power," Aug. 30). Even the relatively small number of wind turbines in this country slaughter an estimated 140,000 to 328,000 eagles, hawks, falcons, vultures, California condors, and other endangered and protected flying creatures in North America each year. While possession of an eagle feather can result in a stiff fine, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service allows repeated "takings" (killings)
SPORTS
September 5, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
The Eagles cut 21 players and traded Sam Bradford to reduce their roster to 53 players on Saturday, and they now have only four linebackers. That will likely change in the coming days while the Eagles scan the waiver wire and make further changes. "In terms of our 53-man roster, it is fluid right now," said Howie Roseman, the Eagles' executive vice president of football operations. "We will see what happens in the next couple of days. A 4-3 team, four linebackers is a low number and we'll just have to see what shakes out and what happens going forward and what's out there.
SPORTS
September 3, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
Lane Johnson did not play in the Eagles' preseason finale on Thursday, a reversal of the initial plan to play Johnson despite the 10-game suspension looming for him. But coach Doug Pederson kept Johnson inactive, and the coaching staff is considering the possibility that Johnson could be with the team next week. The right tackle is awaiting word from the league on the results of a second sample testing and whether he violated the league's policy on performance- enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
August 23, 2016 | By Les Bowen, STAFF WRITER
DOUG PEDERSON didn't even try to pretend the Eagles would be fine with the linebackers they had on hand, when Pederson was asked about the depth situation there Saturday, in the wake of Joe Walker's season-ending ACL tear. "Obviously something is going to have to be done," Pederson said. Sunday evening, league sources confirmed an ESPN report that the Eagles were signing 31-year-old linebacker Stephen Tulloch, who played for defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz in Tennessee and Detroit.
SPORTS
August 13, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
Doug Pederson is preparing for the possibility that Lane Johnson is suspended 10 games for his second violation of the NFL's policy on performance-enhancing drugs, as reports have indicated. Johnson has not been suspended, but Pederson said he "must anticipate" that the suspension could be levied. "You've always got to be mindful of that, obviously, in the back of your mind," Pederson said. "If that's the case, if it's upheld, we've got to be prepared to make some moves. And until it happens, we go full steam, but at the same time, we also know we've got to be smart about it to have people ready to go, if it is upheld.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, Staff Writer
High-flying fun comes to the Shore on Saturday with the start of the 24th annual Wildwood Ultimate Beach Frisbee Tournament, a two-day competition and one of the largest events of its kind in the world. Organized by Ultimate Frisbee enthusiasts Len Dagit and Michael Adlis with the support of the City of Wildwood, the tournament will draw more than 500 teams - and thousands of players ranging in age from teendom to late 50s - from as close as Philadelphia, and as far as Canada and Italy.
SPORTS
July 29, 2016 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Columnist
IT IS the dream of 99.9 percent of the football-playing kids in America to one day play in the NFL. It certainly was Aaron Grymes' dream three years ago, but it didn't quite work out. Grymes, an all-conference cornerback at the University of Idaho, went unclaimed in the 2013 draft. No one signed him after the draft, either. The Green Bay Packers invited him to their rookie minicamp on a tryout basis, but he didn't stick. With his wife Hannah three months pregnant, Grymes needed a job. His position coach at Idaho, Torey Hunter, had played in the Canadian Football League and asked him if he might be interested in going up there.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - On a hot beach day, Barbara Malik, 36, took a break with her three sons along the boardwalk for a late-afternoon snack. A few bites into their soft pretzels and fries, six seagulls swarmed in from the beach. The birds paused just inches above their heads. They squawked, and they tried - unsuccessfully - to snag a meal. "We're not even feeding them," said Malik, of Williamstown. "If you try to feed them, they probably hover over more - but they're still hovering over us even now. " It's a common scene up and down the Jersey Shore.
NEWS
July 6, 2016 | By John Timpane, STAFF WRITER
Chick Corea, Christian McBride, and Brian Blade - what a trio! - were working through Duke Ellington's "Sophisticated Lady" at Longwood Gardens Sunday night - when something happened that suited the evening. On a night that belonged to Philly-born double bassist McBride at least as much as it did to Corea or Blade, McBride decided to take up the bow. As he began delectable explorations, urging out sinewy, singing, athletic lines, the birds struck up in the trees surrounding the Open Air Theatre.
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