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Bird Sanctuary

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NEWS
March 31, 1991 | By Louis R. Carlozo, Special to The Inquirer
Walk down Pelican Drive in Audubon Park, and you'll hear tell of a flap about birds. Look around, and you'll see why. Jean and Bob DuCoin have a penchant for feeding fowl - particularly pigeons, which leave their calling cards on car hoods, rooftops and the street. And the neighbors are squawking. Citing health hazards, the local housing corporation asked the DuCoins in a letter three weeks ago to stop feeding the birds. "It sounds like a stupid problem, doesn't it," Jean DuCoin said.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | By Pamela J. Podger, Special to The Inquirer
Michelle Kovack, a fall intern at Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, peered into a refrigerator and eyed a red plastic tub of thawing meat. "Guess they've been fed," she said, striding into the mews where about 10 maimed birds are kept. Kovack raised her gauntlet-clad arm and convinced a blind, red-tailed hawk, Amelia, to abandon her perch and come closer to where dinner waited. Amelia snatched dinner in her talons and tugged at the meat. For those who are rapt about raptors - hawks, ospreys, falcons and eagles - the three-month intern program is an up-close look at the birds that soar above Kittatinny Ridge and navigate south by the rugged Appalachian peaks.
NEWS
December 5, 1997 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The saga of the Malvern Hills II subdivision and the bird sanctuary it threatened has come to an end, but with a twist. One of the biggest opponents of the proposed development, Malvern resident David Malec, has been given a quarter-acre by the developer, Short Bros. of West Chester, in exchange for dropping his lawsuit against Short Bros. and the Borough Council. The land will serve as a buffer between Malec's property on High Street and Malvern Hills II, according to Tom Alloy, an owner of Short Bros.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | By Stephanie Banchero, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The plaque reads: JOHN C. PARRY JR. BIRD SANCTUARY LOWER GWYNEDD TOWNSHIP. But few people are aware of it, becaused almost no one had seen the memorial marker in at least 10 years. A decade's worth of unattended growth by thorny multiflora rose bushes and dense Japanese honeysuckle vines blanketed the 2- by 1 1/2-foot stone, obscuring it to passers-by. Dozens of hikers and birdwatchers probably wandered within inches of the plaque without knowing they were entering a sanctuary.
NEWS
May 9, 1988 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
Mitch Deighan says the best view of the "bird sanctuary" is from his second-floor rear window. Bird sanctuary? Is this guy for real? After all, he lives in a rowhouse on 5th Street near Parrish in Northern Liberties. He answers the door at 1 p.m., wiping sleep from his eyes, and apologizing for his odd sleeping hours and the condition of his 130-year-old house. It's been nearly 10 years since the 39-year-old artist moved into the decayed building, but it's still in the beginning stages of rehabilitation.
NEWS
June 1, 1994 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Like most youngsters, Jason Voss loved the outdoors. As a fifth grader at Pennell Elementary School, he would get off the bus in the morning, race to homeroom, grab a bucket, and go out to water the fruit trees in the school's environmental center. When he moved on to the Northley Middle School, Jason missed the environmental center. But he never forgot it. Now, four months after his death at age 14 from leukemia, Jason, too, is not forgotten: His enthusiasm and spirit for nature will be memorialized in a bird sanctuary being built at the Pennell School.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | By Pheralyn Dove, Special to The Inquirer
There's no sign to distinguish the Abington Bird Center. For all motorists along Valley Road can tell, it's simply another overgrown wooded area near SEPTA's Meadowbrook Train Station, though particularly lovely now as the leaves change color. Despite its anonymity, the bird sanctuary - which was part of the Herkness farm before being donated to Abington Township - can be found on local maps and was originally designated as a public place to study and appreciate wildlife. Although some may view the property's unmanicured appearance as a sign of neglect, nature lovers and township officials see it differently.
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | By Chris Panzetta, Special to The Inquirer
Malvern Borough Council has unanimously approved a resident's plan to subdivide a woodland plot and to build two houses on it. In a Tuesday night meeting, council voted 7-0 to accept William S. Davison's plan to subdivide 1.5 acres of woodlands located on the west side of Longford Avenue, north of High Street. Davison plans to build two houses that would have a common wall in the twin style on a 12,000-square-foot section to the front of the tract and to leave the woodlands undeveloped.
NEWS
July 9, 2010
Jim Bohlen, 84, whose snap decision to sail to Amchitka Island, Alaska, to protest an underground nuclear test led to the creation of the environmental organization Greenpeace, died Monday in Comox, British Columbia. The cause was complications of Parkinson's disease, said his daughter, Margot Bradley of Philadelphia. Mr. Bohlen was a founder of the Don't Make a Wave Committee, a group of Sierra Club members determined to oppose nuclear testing at Amchitka Island in the Aleutians, which had begun in 1969.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | By Ralph Vigoda, Inquirer Staff Writer
Behind it, the R5 rumbles and squeals as it passes through Haverford Station. In front of it, the staccato of jackhammers on Montgomery Avenue testifies to another road project. But between the two sounds of the city is a contemplative spot where cardinals rest in hemlocks, mockingbirds sing and butterflies flit about multicolored flowers. The bird sanctuary on the former property of Catharine Dixon Sharpe at Montgomery Avenue and Haverford Station Road is peaceful. It is cool.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* PARROT CONFIDENTIAL. 8 tonight, WHYY12. * GROUND FLOOR. 10 and 10:35 p.m. tomorrow, TBS.   POLLY, it seems, wants much more than a cracker. That's the takeaway from "Parrot Confidential," tonight's installment of PBS' "Nature," which makes a compelling case against breeding parrots for pets while offering fascinating glimpses of what it's like to live with highly intelligent creatures whose care can represent more than a lifetime's commitment. I'm no sucker for nature documentaries - I probably couldn't pick a wildebeest out of a lineup - but who doesn't love a talking bird?
TRAVEL
December 9, 2012 | By Lystra Lashley, Washington Post
I'll never forget sailing on a glass-bottom boat from Store Bay in Tobago to Buccoo Reef, one of the most spectacular treasures of the Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago. At the Coral Gardens, the boat stopped to allow those who wanted to swim, snorkel, or scuba dive to get off, while the rest of us stayed on to survey the fantastic coral formations and watch the varied marine life swimming in the turquoise water beneath the boat. At the Nylon Pool, a naturally formed pool within the reef itself, I got out of the boat with the other passengers and jumped into the warm water.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
I warmed to Steve Saffier as soon as he said we'd be better friends to the birds if we did a little less raking. And when he suggested a way to build habitats while spending less time on the lawn, I thought there must be a catch. Saffier, who directs the Audubon at Home program, spoke Tuesday evening with the Sierra Club of Chester County, hoping to enlist citizen scientists over Presidents' Day weekend to help with the Great Backyard Bird Count. The four-day event is made for casual birders, the sort who might sit by the fire, look out the window, and jot down the number of house finches and white-throated sparrows spied at the feeder.
NEWS
September 10, 2012
Karen Rile lives and works in Chestnut Hill The sound starts around midnight, rising from the park. It slices through the late summer chorus of crickets like a deranged soprano. Is it a monster? Is something being killed? Up and down Shawnee Street, windows light up. Dogs are going crazy. Our terrier growls and postures, ready to defend his family. "Do you hear it?" texts the woman across the street. "It's back. " The first night, we thought someone was being attacked in the woods.
NEWS
July 9, 2010
Jim Bohlen, 84, whose snap decision to sail to Amchitka Island, Alaska, to protest an underground nuclear test led to the creation of the environmental organization Greenpeace, died Monday in Comox, British Columbia. The cause was complications of Parkinson's disease, said his daughter, Margot Bradley of Philadelphia. Mr. Bohlen was a founder of the Don't Make a Wave Committee, a group of Sierra Club members determined to oppose nuclear testing at Amchitka Island in the Aleutians, which had begun in 1969.
NEWS
March 20, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's cold, it's muddy, you're still wearing socks to bed, and snow remains a possibility. The famous Equinox Storm dumped more than 11 inches on the region exactly 50 years ago this week. But happy spring, people! It starts today. Actually, spring started at 1:48 this morning, and if you can stand the weather, head outside and be very still. Despite the chill, you'll see - and hear and smell - all the signs of this season of rebirth. Toni Ann Flanigan has only to step into her yard in Germantown to see evidence of spring: a sea of plants that signals the start of her busiest time as a garden designer.
NEWS
August 2, 2004
Community for over-55s? Don't knock it I read Eileen Schafus-Cohen's July 26 commentary ("Skip the over-55 communities, and keep that youthful outlook") and would say that she has made many assumptions that aren't true about over-55 communities. About the only thing that was correct is that she wouldn't be allowed to air out her quilt - and thank goodness for that. My husband and I moved to an over-55 community two years ago. We were tired of tall trees, snow removal, too big a house and too much work.
NEWS
November 18, 2003 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It truly was a dump with a view. Back in the day, you could take your household trash, your building materials, your whatever, to the city dump and leave it out there at the edge of the island, a lovely spot (except for the landfill part) where the ocean meets the inlet meets the bay. Must've been nice to be an old Coke bottle in North Wildwood. But soon you, too, can live at the old dump with the breathtaking view. All it's taking is an elaborate and lengthy capping of the site, the blessing of state environmental officials, and a focus-group-fueled P.R. campaign by the builder, K. Hovnanian.
NEWS
April 13, 1998 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
The Easter Chicken is alive and clucking - but only because it decided to cross the road. The chicken bolted from a loading dock at a poultry processing plant in Queen Village last week and dashed into the middle of Swanson Street, where dogwalker Kerri Hunter-Woodman and her client, Raggs, found it. "It was a chicken, just nonchalantly walking down the street" as cars swerved around it, she said. She was trying to grab the bird for a rescue when a car squealed to a stop and two men jumped out. The chicken took one look at the men and took off. "The feathers were flying," Hunter-Woodman said.
NEWS
December 5, 1997 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The saga of the Malvern Hills II subdivision and the bird sanctuary it threatened has come to an end, but with a twist. One of the biggest opponents of the proposed development, Malvern resident David Malec, has been given a quarter-acre by the developer, Short Bros. of West Chester, in exchange for dropping his lawsuit against Short Bros. and the Borough Council. The land will serve as a buffer between Malec's property on High Street and Malvern Hills II, according to Tom Alloy, an owner of Short Bros.
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