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Bird

ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Queer Cinema cult hero Gregg Araki's incursion into mainstream film, which began with the 2007 stoner comedy Smiley Face , continues with White Bird in a Blizzard , an enjoyable, if uneven, adaptation of Laura Kasischke's coming-of-age novel about a teenage girl whose mother vanishes into thin air. The film is set in bourgeois suburbia in the 1980s, a world Araki has mocked and assaulted with his wonderfully punk-infused, sexually adventurous...
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like most people with big weekend plans, David La Puma was watching the weather forecast. It looked perfect: a cold front, followed by northwest winds. Perfect for the birds, that is, and the humans who watch them. Both flocked to Cape May for New Jersey Audubon's fall festival, an annual event that began 68 years ago amid post-World War II ebullience, and that contributes a bundle to the local economy. This year's outing began Friday and ended Sunday. Several thousand birders - often with binoculars plastered firmly to their faces - attended the three-day event, which included field trips, lectures, demonstrations, and an exhibit hall full of the best binoculars and scopes money can buy. On what had to be some of the most glorious days of the fall, people scoped southbound seabirds that soared over the ocean off Avalon Point, where counters log nearly a million birds every fall.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Andrew K. Touchstone, 51, of Gladwyne, a Philadelphia lawyer and small-game hunter who loved to work his bird dogs in the marshes of Delaware, died of a heart attack Tuesday, Oct. 21, at his home. A Bryn Mawr native, Mr. Touchstone graduated from Harriton High School, Lehigh University, and Penn State's Dickinson School of Law. He was a longtime resident of the Main Line. His first job was with the law firm Swartz, Campbell & Detweiler in Center City. He worked for several more years at Smith, Giacometti & Chikowski before starting his own firm, Touchstone & Associates, in 2005.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
"THIS CASE is not about a bird. And it's not about illegal aliens," a defense attorney said yesterday in federal court. Instead, attorney Mark Cedrone told jurors in his opening statement, "This is all about whether he told a lie. " The "he" refers to his client, Mikhail Zubialevich, who is on trial with co-defendants Nikolaos Frangos and George Capuzello. The three men held varying positions as part of a work crew painting the double-decker Girard Point Bridge, which carries Interstate 95 across the Schuylkill in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
October 20, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most valuable player OFFENSE: Jason Peters The all-pro left tackle has been so good that it's easy to take him for granted. With other key pieces missing on the offensive line, Peters has been a security blanket on Nick Foles' blind side. He kept elite pass rushers Robert Quinn and Jason Pierre-Paul from sacking Foles during the last two games. Peters has not allowed a sack since the season opener. DEFENSE: Malcolm Jenkins Although he might not be a star, Jenkins is a significant upgrade at safety and has been valuable to the secondary.
SPORTS
October 10, 2014 | By Les Bowen, Daily News Staff Writer
WHAT YOU SAW the Eagles' defense doing in the second half last Sunday against the Rams? That's pretty much the opposite of what you should see this week against the Giants. We're not really talking here about the nearly-blowing-a-27-point-lead part. A 27-point lead is unlikely against a Giants team that has won three in a row, all by double digits. And we can't really guarantee that the surrendering-a-bunch-of-yards-and-points part won't happen again, either. In the Eagles, we have the NFL's 28th-ranked defense, 24th against the rush, 29th against the pass, a group that has given up big plays with alarming frequency.
SPORTS
October 8, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
It does not sound as if Eagles coach Chip Kelly plans to make a change at cornerback in the starting lineup. "No," Kelly said about the possibility, before pointing out that slot cornerback Brandon Boykin played all 26 snaps in the fourth quarter of Sunday's 34-28 win over the St. Louis Rams. The undersize cornerback is mentioned most often as a candidate to replace Bradley Fletcher or Cary Williams on the outside. With the Rams needing to pass their way back into the game, the Eagles used nickel and dime formations exclusively in the fourth quarter.
SPORTS
October 7, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Just before Bennie Logan lamented the Eagles' lack of killer instinct Sunday, before he conjured the image of a mixed-martial artist too forgiving and passive to endure the Octagon, general manager Howie Roseman sidled up to Logan's locker and jabbed his right hand toward him for a perky little fist pound. "All right, Ben," Roseman said as Logan, the team's 6-foot-2, 315-pound nose tackle, returned the gesture with more deliberation and less enthusiasm. Roseman kept moving around the room, and Logan continued speaking about a 34-28 Eagles victory over the St. Louis Rams that never should have been that close, about a defense that dominated the game's first three quarters, then damn-near disintegrated in the fourth.
SPORTS
October 6, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Backups, third-stringers, and hangers-on don't make NFL rosters. Not on the way in, anyway. Players who reach this level have usually been stars their whole lives, the pride of the neighborhood, the best guys on whatever teams they happened to play for. They are all alpha dog competitors who climbed the pyramid through high school and college and got to the best league in the world because that is where they belong. And then it gets a little different for some of them. "I was a star player all the way until I got to the NFL," said Bryan Braman, a linebacker by trade but a full-time member of the special teams for the Eagles.
SPORTS
September 30, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
SANTA CLARA, Calif. - Sometimes, football works this way. There is karmic payback that comes due for teams that insist on playing poorly for much of every game but are still able to dance away with a victory. The Eagles walked that narrow edge for three weeks this season, and they did again Sunday against the San Francisco 49ers. This time, the hat didn't hold a rabbit. In fact, the hat usually only held holding, or some other infraction that stalled their offensive drives or helped the 49ers move down the field.
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