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NEWS
January 16, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Despite advances in reducing infant mortality rates over the last quarter- century, the rate for blacks is still twice that for whites, a federal study said yesterday. Compared with whites, black infants are more often born at under 5 1/2 poundsand have a smaller chance of surviving their first year even if they have an adequate birth weight, according to the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. "If black infants born in 1980 (the latest year surveyed in depth by the CDC)
NEWS
October 7, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
African American infants are more likely than white babies to be placed on their stomachs when sleeping, causing a higher incidence of sudden infant death syndrome, newly released research suggests. The study results illuminated two well-known facts about SIDS - that it occurs twice as often in black infants as in white babies, and that one risk factor is sleeping prone. Other risk factors for SIDS include smoking by the mother while pregnant, sleeping on soft bedding, and bed sharing.
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | By Tracey A. Reeves, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Rahquel Purcell, a 28-year-old businesswoman, never expected that she would be one of the thousands of black women who, in any given year, go into early labor and deliver frail babies. She made sure to get complete prenatal care. She had no history of drug use, diabetes, hypertension, or any of the other health risks often cited as explanations for the startling disparities in sickness and survival rates between black and white babies. Still, Purcell's daughter, Falyn, was born just 27 weeks into the pregnancy and weighed only 2 pounds, 1 ounce at birth.
NEWS
November 11, 2001 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The infant-death rate has hit an all-time low in Philadelphia, but black babies are still far more likely than white babies to die in their first year of life, and babies in the city's poorest neighborhoods are more at risk than babies born in some developing nations. The new numbers reflect not only the health of infants in the region, but also the overall well-being of its communities. There were 11.6 infant deaths for every 1,000 live births in 1999, the lowest on record for Philadelphia, according to the latest vital statistics.
NEWS
October 2, 1987 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer (The Associated Press contributed to this report.)
Philadelphia's infant mortality rate was the country's third highest last year, and the rate of death of black babies was also third highest among the nation's 10 largest cities, according to a study by the Chicago Reporter. With 16.4 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 1986, Philadelphia trailed only Detroit, with 19.7, and Chicago, with 16.5, said the monthly publication, which writes extensively on race issues. In the statistics for deaths among black infants less than one year of age, Chicago, with 23.0 deaths per 1,000 live births, ranked first, followed by Detroit's 22.4 and Philadelphia with 21.5.
NEWS
October 2, 1987 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer (The Associated Press contributed to this report.)
Philadelphia's infant mortality rate was the country's third-highest last year, and the rate of death of black babies was also third-highest among the nation's 10 largest cities, according to a study by the Chicago Reporter. With 16.4 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 1986, Philadelphia trailed only Detroit, with 19.7, and Chicago, with 16.5, said the monthly publication, which writes extensively on racial issues. In the statistics for deaths among black infants less than one year of age, Chicago, with 23.0 deaths per 1,000 live births, ranked first, followed by Detroit's 22.4 and Philadelphia with 21.5.
NEWS
July 11, 1998 | By Francis Mancini
The New York Times is considered the pride of American journalism, but I was intrigued by a strange performance in the issue of July 1. News of a report on new data from the National Center for Health Statistics was placed at the top right of the front page, the spot customarily reserved for the day's leading news story. The headline: "Black Birthrate for Single Women is at 40-Year Low. " What was intriguing was the article's treatment of the data. After an opening paragraph that repeated the headline's portentous message, the second paragraph came to the numbers: "There were 74.4 births per 1,000 unmarried black women in 1996 - the last year for which complete data are available.
NEWS
November 18, 1986 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Pittsburgh - supposedly the most livable city in America - the mortality rate for black babies is higher than for any city in the country. Of every 1,000 black babies born there, 29 die before their first birthdays. That little-known fact will be used today by a coalition of women's groups and health organizations to help launch a statewide campaign for improved medical services for pregnant women and children. The initiative, titled "A Healthy Start," calls for a loosening of eligibility requirements for pregnant women for the state-operated Medicaid program; the creation of a subsidized low-cost insurance program for low- income families with no private health insurance, and improvements in prenatal care, family planning services and nutritional programs for low- income women and children.
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | By Tom Teepen
Are you getting as fed up as I am with this apparently endless game of gotcha quotes? The latest round is the flap about what was recently said by William Bennett, the Republican former secretary of education, drug czar and what-all. He said that if we want to cut the crime rate, we could encourage wholesale abortions of black babies. That is indeed appalling, or would be if Bennett had said it, or even implied it. He didn't. Reduced to stock bloviation now that he apparently has nothing serious to do, Bennett was countering a caller to his talk-radio program.
NEWS
July 11, 2005
I have a question for Catherine Lucey and Will Bunch: Exactly what have either of you done to help "impoverished" Africans? I ask because I found their comment about Jay-Z and Beyonce in their article "Rating Live 8" (July 5) totally uncalled for and downright mean-spirited. The underlying nastiness of the statement "guess their love for impoverished Africans has its limitations" because Jay-Z and Beyonce did not come to the media tent, gave no "props" to these very busy entertainers.
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NEWS
July 27, 2013
Learning on the installment plan Oregon state officials have taken a bold step toward solving the tuition problem for students trying to attend public universities. With the state's new "Pay it Forward, Pay it Back" plan, approved this month, needy students will pay nothing while in school, and then only 3 percent of their income for the next two decades after getting a four-year degree. Those who attend for a shorter time would pay a prorated amount. Although this plan is in use in other countries, it has never been tried here.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The leaders of two black anti-abortion groups today denounced West Philadelphia abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell as a "racist of the worst kind" and a "butcher who preyed on the women and girls of his own race. " Day Gardner, president of the Washington-based National Black Pro-Life Union and the Rev. Clenard Howard Childress Jr. of Learn Northeast, based in Montclair, N.J. spoke to reporters outside the Criminal Justice Center in Center City as Gosnell's murder trial continued inside.
NEWS
July 9, 2009 | By Matt Flegenheimer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wanted: Woman seeking man: tall, handsome, bright, family-oriented leader of the free world. Sure, only one gentleman fills that bill at the moment, and a Chicago lawyer named Michelle snatched up that skinny Harvard grad years ago. But across the country, many women dare to harbor the audacious hope of finding "their own Barack" - a man with integrity, character and spirituality, one who loves and values his wife and makes his family a...
NEWS
November 10, 2005 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A routine Philadelphia School Reform Commission meeting fell into chaos yesterday after members voted to retain a curriculum-development company whose controversial cofounder came under fire in September for making comments about aborting black babies. After the commission voted 3-2 against severing ties with the Virginia-based K12 company, which has a $3 million contract with the district, dozens of African American audience members stormed the table and admonished members. One man waved a cane over his head in anger.
NEWS
October 10, 2005
DEAR BILL Bennett, "If you abort all black babies, it would lower the crime rate. Though it would be morally reprehensible, it would lower the crime rate. " It is shocking that this would come from a person who marched with Dr. King, someone as intelligent as you. Statements like this are the reason we need a national discussion on race. Blacks do not have the market cornered on crime and there would still be crime if there were no black people. Statements that demonize black people.
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | By Tom Teepen
Are you getting as fed up as I am with this apparently endless game of gotcha quotes? The latest round is the flap about what was recently said by William Bennett, the Republican former secretary of education, drug czar and what-all. He said that if we want to cut the crime rate, we could encourage wholesale abortions of black babies. That is indeed appalling, or would be if Bennett had said it, or even implied it. He didn't. Reduced to stock bloviation now that he apparently has nothing serious to do, Bennett was countering a caller to his talk-radio program.
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | By Dale Mezzacappa INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former U.S. Education Secretary William Bennett, under fire for remarks last week about aborting black babies, resigned yesterday as chairman of K12, the education company he cofounded. K12 runs Internet-based schools around the country, including the Norristown-based Pennsylvania Virtual Charter School, the state's largest cyber charter. The company also has a $3 million contract with the Philadelphia School District for elementary science materials. Bennett resigned under pressure from the K12 board, according to executive committee chairman Ron Packard, who cofounded the company.
NEWS
July 11, 2005
I have a question for Catherine Lucey and Will Bunch: Exactly what have either of you done to help "impoverished" Africans? I ask because I found their comment about Jay-Z and Beyonce in their article "Rating Live 8" (July 5) totally uncalled for and downright mean-spirited. The underlying nastiness of the statement "guess their love for impoverished Africans has its limitations" because Jay-Z and Beyonce did not come to the media tent, gave no "props" to these very busy entertainers.
NEWS
October 10, 2004 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They are the tiniest of babies, some so small they fit in the palm of a hand. These premature infants spend their early weeks and months in a world of wires, alarms, machines and medicines, struggling for life. And then those who make it go home - often to a host of problems. In 1990, The Inquirer wrote about a group of premature babies born at the Medical College of Pennsylvania in East Falls. Today, they are 14 years old. Here are some of their stories. When Nyema Bredell wrote her autobiography in seventh grade last year, she had to include how much she weighed at birth.
NEWS
March 1, 2004 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The tiny shackles - once used to confine a child, now rusted and powerless - drew horrified gasps. A woman was almost brought to tears by photographs of black men, whip-scarred or hanging limply, and smiling white faces behind them. "I just can't believe one human could treat another human this way," said Carmen Biollo, 29, looking away from the photographs. "In school, we touched on slavery briefly but you don't really see it. I've never seen photos like this before. It doesn't make sense to me. " Biollo, of Philadelphia, was one of hundreds of people who marked the end of Black History Month yesterday with a visit to the Independence Visitor Center's black history showcase, which included appearances by the Tuskegee Airmen and players from the Negro Leagues' Philadelphia Stars.
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