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NEWS
December 27, 2005 | By Tanya Barrientos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You'd think the last thing professional ballet dancer Philip Colucci would want to do during his time off is tax his body. He already pushes it to the limit seven days a week, with eight hours of rehearsals and dance classes at Pennsylvania Ballet. Plus back-to-back performances of The Nutcracker on weekends. You'd think he'd put his feet up. Relax. But dancers aren't like us. And Colucci isn't like other dancers. When he's not pirouetting or pas de deuxing, the 27-year-old native of Malaga, Gloucester County, is making his way to the Seito Goju-Ryu Karate Institute, deep in South Philadelphia, to train as a first-degree black belt.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Lisa Moorhead, Special to The Inquirer
Creeping stealthily through the woods, Delaware County's own karate kid cornered her green, slimy opponent and prepared for the capture. Suddenly, another foe hidden from sight let out a startling battle cry, Rib-it . . . Rib-it!, and the wide-eyed frog she had targeted took a leap to freedom. Erika Parenti, 9, one of the county's youngest martial-arts students to achieve a black belt, was merely trying to catch a couple of frogs that day. But she also learned a valuable lesson about strength and fear that would help her earn the belt she received last month.
NEWS
March 22, 1987 | By Tim Panaccio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ray Williams had only to walk outside his house near Oxford Circle to find the inspiration needed to learn karate. "I lived on a bad street," said Williams. "I got into a lot of fights. " He was 9 years old then. Now, five years later, Williams has more than learned to handle himself against street thugs. Last weekend, he captured the Pennsylvania AAU bantamweight title in tae kwon do. Williams, who is a freshman at Wilson Junior High, is a first dan black belt, the highest competitive level in the Korean style of martial arts.
NEWS
February 8, 1993 | By Brian Miller, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Emotions can run high in wrestling matches. And some wrestlers decide that basic moves aren't enough. So they head-butt, gouge eyes, use the crossface more as a stinging slap, and even flat-out punch. None of these antics is legal, of course, but they would be downright dangerous against Germantown Academy's Jay Hamilton. The Patriots' superb 119- pounder has a black belt in Tae Kwon Do, the ancient self-defense technique that translates to mean foot-fist art. "You can't use those moves in wrestling, although I guess if some guys got to me, I could flatten them if I had to," Hamilton said with a laugh.
SPORTS
May 2, 1994 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The reigning Philadelphia Senior Open Publinks Champion is a 71-year-old man named Walter Ferguson, who can be found at the Cobbs Creek Golf Club in West Philadelphia daily. He's been playing Cobbs since 1942, when he came up from Charlotte, N.C., with his boyhood friend, Charlie Sifford. Sifford went on to become a famous professional golfer, the first black man to play the tour. Ferguson stayed, for the most part, home in West Philly. "We're still friends, but there's always a little jealousy with us," Ferguson said yesterday, as he played through the wind and the rain, trying to beat his age, which he does occasionally, and trying to take money from a dozen other golfers, which he does routinely.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
WHEN A CRAB took hold of Pat Wilson's finger and wouldn't let go, she looked it dead in the eye and said, "You go in the pot first!" Pat Wilson was not only the "world's best crabber," as her daughter described her, but she had an irrepressible wit that didn't fail her even with a crab hanging on her finger. Or when she was diagnosed with cancer. She wouldn't say the word but referred to it as "this silly thing they say I've got," and her natural optimism never dimmed. Patricia Ann Wilson, onetime entertainment reporter for the Inquirer, a Civil Air Patrol pilot during World War II, a black-belt karate expert who studied in Japan and a woman much cherished for her quirky charm, died of cancer Sunday.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
This is a very important day in the life of any martial artist," said the sensei, the teacher, to his students seated before him, "but especially for Bob, who started his journey late in life. "Bob, please take care of everybody. Try not to hurt them. " Bob O'Hare, who turns 80 this week, was about to be tested for his black belt in Aikido. His best friends - from college, from his first job at Univac in the 1950s, guys with canes - came Saturday to the River of Life Martial Arts & Wellness Center, the dojo, in Fort Washington to share in the big moment.
NEWS
November 27, 1991 | By Andy Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Sumner Bullock, 34, a 6-foot-3, 200-pound black belt in karate who loved basketball, top-of-the-line stereo equipment and long weekend drives in his red Mustang GT, died Saturday at Hahnemann University Hospital. Death was sudden and unexpected. He had undergone an apparently successful liver transplant in the Cleveland Clinic in August that had brought him out of a coma and back to the brink of good health. Recuperating last week at Magee Rehabilitation Hospital, he had been able to walk on his own and was looking forward to going home on a 12-hour pass for Thanksgiving.
NEWS
October 30, 1986 | By M. G. Missanelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ambler's Megann Peddigree was only 11 years old when she got her first taste of karate. It was a right-hand chop to the mouth, delivered expertly by a boy the same age who had no intention of taking it easy on a girl . . . at least not with his friends watching. When the bout was over, Megann had a bloody lip, a bruised eye, a puffy nose and a set of shocked parents about to rethink their daughter's recreational priorities. "I thought I lost her," said Patrick Byrnes, her karate coach.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Students in the Atlantic Avenue School and the Seventh Avenue School, which are roughly a mile apart, claim Lauri Hassan is their new principal. And both groups are right. Beginning Sept. 1, Hassan became the principal of both elementary schools. But for Hassan, who holds a black belt in karate, it's a challenge she can easily take on. "I split my schedule so that I'm at one building half the time and the other building the other half. . . . If there's an emergency at one building, they [the school staff]
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NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
This is a very important day in the life of any martial artist," said the sensei, the teacher, to his students seated before him, "but especially for Bob, who started his journey late in life. "Bob, please take care of everybody. Try not to hurt them. " Bob O'Hare, who turns 80 this week, was about to be tested for his black belt in Aikido. His best friends - from college, from his first job at Univac in the 1950s, guys with canes - came Saturday to the River of Life Martial Arts & Wellness Center, the dojo, in Fort Washington to share in the big moment.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
Actor Jim Kelly, 67, who played a glib American martial artist in Enter the Dragon , with Bruce Lee, died of cancer Saturday at his home in San Diego, his ex-wife Marilyn Dishman said. Sporting an Afro hairstyle and sideburns, Mr. Kelly made a splash with his one-liners and fight scenes in the 1973 martial-arts classic. His later films included Three the Hard Way, Black Belt Jones , and Black Samurai. During a 2010 interview with Salon.com, Mr. Kelly said he started studying martial arts in 1964 in Kentucky and later moved to California where he earned a black belt in karate.
NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When his 6-year-old nephew wouldn't cooperate in picking out his school clothes for the next day, a Delaware County man - a black belt in karate - beat him to death, officials said. Paul Adams, 38 of Wallingford, allegedly lashed Tyreece Charlow with a large belt after the child failed to follow directions promptly, the District Attorney's Office said. "The beating lasted 45 minutes," District Attorney Jack Whelan said. He called the incident a "heinous, savage beating," adding that medical examiner's staff said they had not seen a worse case of child abuse.
SPORTS
October 10, 2012 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer
ON SATURDAY afternoon at the Linc, as Temple's football team put the finishing touches on an eventful return to the Big East after eight seasons, Montel Harris said it felt like "old times. " As in, keep feeding him the rock and watch as something good happens. With victory all but secured, the newest Owl made sure by running 35 yards for a touchdown off the right side, one play after Marcus Green had blocked a field goal that would have put South Florida ahead with just over a minute left.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Henry Lewis, 68, of Wayne, a karate grand master and kickboxing champion who developed a martial-arts training system, died Friday, Aug. 31, of a brain tumor at Coatesville Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Mr. Lewis, a 10th-degree black belt, was U.S. karate champion from 1966 to 1969. In 1971, he retired as undefeated U.S. heavyweight kickboxing champion. He was featured in both the Ring, a boxing magazine, and Sports Illustrated. In 1975, Mr. Lewis was inducted into the Black Belt Magazine Hall of Fame.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
Police today released a surveillance video of three men wanted in the theft of a safe containing $100,000 in cash and jewelry during a daylight burglary in Society Hill. The brazen heist took place around lunchtime on Monday, April 30, on the 500 block of Spruce Street. Police said the trio arrived about 8:10 a.m. in a black SUV and parked it on the corner of Sixth and Cypress Streets. They remained inside the vehicle until about 12:40 p.m. They broke into the residence through a side window and pried the safe from the floor, police said, The video shows one of the burglars, all of whom wore gray hoodies, lugging the safe across the street to the waiting SUV, before fleeing south on Sixth Street just before 1 p.m. Police provided the following descriptions: Suspect No. 1: Black male,20 years-of-age, medium build, medium complexion, light facial hair, wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt, light blue jeans, black belt, sneakers Suspect No. 2: Black male, 20 years-of-age, 5-feet, 8-inches to 5-feet, 10-incges tall, medium build, wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt, gray sweatpants, dark sneakers Suspect No. 3: Black male, 20 years-of-age, 6-feet tall, wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt, dark sweatpants with a white stripe on side, dark baseball cap. He carried the safe.
SPORTS
February 10, 2012 | BY MIKE KERN, kernm@phillynews.com
TWO DECADES after calling it a career, Tim Kerr still holds the Flyers' record for 50-goal seasons (four straight, starting in 1983-84), and the NHL mark for power-play goals in one season (34, in 1985-86). Skill obviously had a bunch to do with that. But it was as much about the way did his job. Most of the time, he planted himself in front of the net looking to make something happen, a style that came with certain physical consequences. There's a reason he once had five shoulder surgeries in a 14-month period.
NEWS
August 22, 2011 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
Brian Rago and Zak Maxwell are martial artists and business partners. Together they teach Brazilian jujitsu at Gracie Academy Philadelphia, the school they operate at the Optimal Gym in Queen Village. Both have earned black belts in this physical and mental discipline, which combines the aggression of street-fighting and wrestling with the grace of ballet. Both are disciples of the style of jujitsu popularized by the legendary Gracie family of Brazil. And both have competed and succeeded in international competition.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
WHEN A CRAB took hold of Pat Wilson's finger and wouldn't let go, she looked it dead in the eye and said, "You go in the pot first!" Pat Wilson was not only the "world's best crabber," as her daughter described her, but she had an irrepressible wit that didn't fail her even with a crab hanging on her finger. Or when she was diagnosed with cancer. She wouldn't say the word but referred to it as "this silly thing they say I've got," and her natural optimism never dimmed. Patricia Ann Wilson, onetime entertainment reporter for the Inquirer, a Civil Air Patrol pilot during World War II, a black-belt karate expert who studied in Japan and a woman much cherished for her quirky charm, died of cancer Sunday.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Somewhere deep down on the long list of Pierce Phillips' special qualities is his lack of hearing. Phillips, a senior at Highland Regional High School in Blackwood, is deaf. That might seem noteworthy to some people, but the folks close to the affable teenager with the curly brown hair are more impressed with his success in school, his sunny disposition, and his swing. Especially his swing. "The best way to describe him is that he's the same as everybody else," said Highland senior infielder/pitcher Tyler Hinchliffe, a Boston College recruit.
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