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Black Child

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NEWS
August 24, 1988 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writers Daniel Rubin and Susan FitzGerald contributed to this article
In a long-awaited decision in a hard-fought custody battle, a federal judge yesterday ordered a 5-year-old black child removed from the black foster parents who have had custody of him since October 1985 and returned to the white foster parents who had cared for him until he was 2 1/2 years old. The ruling by U.S. District Judge John B. Hannum came in the case of Raymond Bullard, the child who has - for half of his life - been the center of...
NEWS
August 25, 1988
As racial battles go in this city, the fight over 5-year-old Raymond Bullard is almost uplifting. Here is a case where two loving couples - one black and one white - are vying for the honor and responsibility of raising an otherwise homeless black child. U.S. District Judge John B. Hannum ruled Tuesday on behalf of the white couple, John and Marilyn McLaughlin of Holmesburg. His reasoning seems eminently sound. Raymond was placed in the McLaughlins' care soon after his birth and was apparently leading a happy, well-adjusted life when he was taken from them at the age of 2 1/2. The reason for his removal, Judge Hannum found, was purely a matter of race - the belief of the city's Department of Human Services that black foster children do best with black parents.
NEWS
November 18, 1994 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The lawyer and his accountant wife have three children of their own and wanted to adopt Jeff, who had been their foster child for about 18 months. But the couple is white and the child is black, and their application for Jeff was rejected. When they asked why, a supervisor at the Chester County Department of Children, Youth and Families said, "The fact is, we have a black mother for the child," attorney Richard "Tim" Curley testified yesterday. Candice Ross, 26, a black woman who helps administer retirement plans, wanted to adopt Stacey, a white child, but was told by the same agency the child was already taken.
NEWS
October 24, 1988 | By Leslie Scism, Daily News Staff Writer
Raymond Bullard, the 5-year-old black child who has played the role of a human yo-yo in an interracial foster-care battle, should be returned for "his mental health" to a white couple with whom he originally lived, a city-hired psychiatrist has recommended. The psychiatrist, in an Oct. 17 report filed in federal court Friday, wrote that Raymond, who began visiting the white couple more frequently two months ago, "now presents himself as a happy, bright boy. " "If I did not know better, I would suspect that he were a totally different child," said the report, written by Dr. Gregory Williams.
NEWS
February 21, 1997 | by Carol B. Fuchs
A 6-year-old boy I know is color-blind. Once a week I make my way across town to an elementary school. The bus, empty when I get on, fills with well-dressed, well-rested professional people going to work in Center City. By the time I reach my destination 56 blocks later, the bus has filled again, with weary-looking, poorly dressed men and women returning from night jobs. I am on my way to an all-black school to help first-graders learn to read. They are anxious to show me what they have remembered from my last visit.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Public Welfare Secretary John F. White Jr. yesterday reversed the decision of one of his administrative law judges and ruled that a black child should not be returned to the white foster parents who want to adopt him. Under White's ruling, Raymond Bullard, who will be 5 in June, will remain with the Rev. Willie and Elaine Williams, who are black. The child has lived with the Overbrook couple since he was removed from the home of John and Marilyn McLaughlin of Northeast Philadelphia in October 1985.
NEWS
May 31, 1989 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what may be the final chapter in a hard-fought custody battle, a federal appeals court yesterday affirmed a U.S. District judge's order that a 5-year- old black child be returned to the white foster parents who had cared for him until he was 2 1/2 years old. A three-judge panel of the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled "the evidence supports a conclusion that a return to the McLaughlins will offer Raymond the best hope of realizing his...
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | By LESLIE SCISM, Daily News Staff Writer
It was while bathing then-2-year-old Raymond Bullard that his foster mother, Marilyn McLaughlin, told the boy he would have to go to another foster home because Catholic Social Services "thought it was best. " "I didn't know if he understood," McLaughlin said yesterday in a choking voice to the federal judge she hopes will order the child's return. McLaughlin is a white Northeast Philadelphia housewife who maintains the black child was removed from her care in October 1985 solely for racial reasons.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Harold Jackson, Editor of the Editorial Page
Has it really been 50 years? It's not that my memories of 1963 are so vivid that it seems like yesterday. It doesn't. But neither does it seem that it was half a century ago when the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came to my hometown of Birmingham, Ala. Man, I'm old. In 1963 I was 9 years old, in the third grade, and not paying much attention to the conversations of all the adults who were apprehensive because the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth had...
NEWS
November 18, 1994 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two people testified in federal court yesterday that Chester County's Department of Children, Youth and Families thwarted their efforts to adopt children because of what they called a racial-matching policy. The testimony came in the case of Debra and B. William Fell, who have sued the county and the department in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia. The Fells, who are white, are seeking the return of the 3-year-old African American girl who had been in their care virtually all her life.
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NEWS
April 22, 2014 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA For Joel and Cheryl Seay, the conviction of their son's killer in March after two terrible, trying trials brought a welcome sense of closure, but it could do little to ease their grief or lessen their desire to do good in their son's name. On Easter Sunday three years ago, the Seay family had just finished their holiday dinner when two young men they had never seen before rang their West Philadelphia doorbell. The men were in a gang, police said. They asked to see the Seays' youngest son, Jarell.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
TWO BLACK MEN, both of whom are former employees of the Women's Christian Alliance Foster Care Agency in Philadelphia, claim they were fired for recommending that a white, married couple adopt a black child. Akeem Dixon, a former recruiter, and Randolph Sanders, a former intake supervisor, filed a federal lawsuit last week against the Women's Christian Alliance (WCA) Foster Care Agency, which contracts with the city Department of Human Services. The 2-year-old boy at the center of the suit, who is referred to only as "Child X," was in the care of a single, black foster mother in June 2012 when his placement goal was changed from foster care to adoption.
NEWS
February 27, 2013
In touch with their Inner Harbor Baltimore's only attraction is an African American museum. Really? The locals were uninterested in the Ravens-Broncos playoff game. Seriously? Baltimore is nothing but a tunnel between Philadelphia and Washington? Well, I don't have space to start reeling off the cultural, entertainment, and sports venues in Charm City ("Baltimore: Beyond the Ravens," Feb. 17). Like Philadelphia, Baltimore has pluses and minuses - with its pros outweighing the cons.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Harold Jackson, Editor of the Editorial Page
Has it really been 50 years? It's not that my memories of 1963 are so vivid that it seems like yesterday. It doesn't. But neither does it seem that it was half a century ago when the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came to my hometown of Birmingham, Ala. Man, I'm old. In 1963 I was 9 years old, in the third grade, and not paying much attention to the conversations of all the adults who were apprehensive because the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth had...
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | Associated Press
SANFORD, Fla. - Thousands joined a march Saturday through the Florida town where 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer, vowing to continue protesting until an arrest is made. Protesters carried signs, chanted "Justice for Trayvon," and clutched the hands of their children while they walked from Crooms Academy of Information Technology - the county's first high school for black students - to the Sanford Police Department. The march was organized by the NAACP and was one of several taking place over the weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2011 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
If it's true that hard work never killed anyone, Sir Alan Ayckbourn surely will live forever. Ambitious and prodigious, with more than 70 plays (and counting) behind him, the 72-year-old Ayckbourn has made his name with a pointedly loquacious style of character-driven theater. He's been rewarded with two Tony Awards (one for lifetime achievement), several Tony nominations, a Laurence Olivier Award, a Critics' Circle Award for Distinguished Service to the Arts, and a knighthood. This week, Philadelphia's Wilma Theater opens its first Ayckbourn play, My Wonderful Day , a curiosity in the British playwright's oeuvre: Its focus is a black child.
NEWS
June 14, 2007 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The creators of the Philadelphia-based cartoon The Adventures of Teddy P. Brains have gone a step beyond the one-to-grow-on lessons of Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids. Joseph Lewis III and Eugene Haynes designed 6-year-old time and space traveler Teddy P. Brains as a math, science and history whiz with an unquenchable thirst for learning. And what the young P. Brains doesn't know off the top of his little chocolate head, he asks his "Brainberry. " "It shows that children of color can live exciting lives," said Yumy Odom, a Temple University professor and founder of the East Coast Black Age of Comics Convention.
NEWS
April 5, 2007 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Much of the study of African Americans and Jews relates to relationships between the two groups. But Lewis Ricardo Gordon, a Jamaica-born, Yale-educated author and Temple University professor, is studying African-Americans who are Jews. And he's not just talking about people of color who became Jews as a result of their parents' inter-marriage or conversion. The founder of Temple University's Institute for the Study of Race and Social Thought and its Center for Afro-Jewish Studies, Gordon, 44, says Jews are among the most racially diverse people on the globe - and many don't even know it. Gordon traces his lineage to Jewish maternal grandparents from Israel and Ireland and describes himself as a secular Jew. Religious observances were not a big part of his childhood, but they are important to him now. And he counts himself among America's largely invisible black Jews.
NEWS
April 26, 2006 | By Kathleen Brady Shea and Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In a hushed Philadelphia courtroom, a federal judge last night denied a Chester County family's final effort to regain custody of their beloved 3-year-old foster child. U.S. District Judge James T. Giles ruled that Randall and Susan Borelly, a white couple from Uwchlan Township, had failed to prove that Chester County officials violated their civil rights when they refused the family's request to adopt Kevin, their black foster child of nearly two years. The decision ended an emotional battle for the Borellys, who filed a lawsuit on April 11, arguing that the county Department of Children, Youth and Families' reason for denying them consideration - an unwritten policy limiting families to one adoption per year - was a pretext for racial discrimination.
NEWS
June 20, 2005
WHEN I heard what Howard Dean said about Republicans, I sat down and wrote the Democratic National Committee a check! Howard is one of the few Democrats who has the courage to "speak truth to power. " He has never said anything with which I did not agree. I'm not concerned about how blunt he is. In fact, I respect him for having the courage to speak out, and I find him inspiring. I don't worry that he'll turn moderate Democrats off. Our true constituency is on the left. If we all have Howard's courage, we'll reinvigorate our grass-roots constituency.
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