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NEWS
May 12, 2005
RE MICHAEL Smerconish's "Think Rodney King, but Upside-Down": He writes: "We'll be spared an insufferable visit to town by Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson and the rest of those who make a living doing nothing but stoking the fires of racial unrest. " I remember he wrote a column seemingly scolding the "black community" for the positive attention afforded Omarosa, the infamous reality-show contestant, by the likes of Oprah Winfrey and the NAACP, while puzzled that these two groups hadn't offered the same to Condoleezza Rice, a woman significantly more accomplished.
NEWS
June 17, 1999 | BY ANDREA D. JOHNSON
There seems to be a major loss in the black community. We feel it. We acknowledge it, see it - feel and recognize that we are not the same. We have succumbed to the marketing schemes of the manufacturers who cater to us and to the political wagon whose wheels we have changed, but it is the same buggy that carried us here.Take, for example, an incident that happened the other night in Germantown. It is unfortunate that one would have to call this unusual, but it is anymore. At the senior citizens building, someone was actually blasting gospel music.
NEWS
July 30, 2008
AMERICA IS a great country. What black people need to do is to get together - black churches and all other black groups - and do what we can to get our people to destroy their guns and their drugs. In their place, go to church. Turn to God up in heaven and also become a more educated people. Let's go to college and become well-educated people, and let's wear clean, decent-looking clothes. Let's have shaves and look decent at all times. Get off these corners. If mankind lived the way God intended, all the money we spend on wars is money that could be spent rebuilding the black ghettos.
NEWS
January 2, 1987 | BY LEON ARISTOTLE WILLIAMS
I am deeply concerned about the attempts of your paper to cast the United Black Business Association as anti-Asian. The picture you painted in a Dec. 15 article and a Dec. 16 editorial was grossly inaccurate and irresponsible. And Signe Wilkinson'sw editorial cartoon is proof that your paper either misunderstands the economic revolution in the black community or has embarked on a racist campaign to subvert that long-overdue revolution. Michael Sokolove's article states that "interviews with community leaders, merchants and others in the black community make clear the Asian business presence is breeding quiet resentment and sometimes outright hostility.
NEWS
December 22, 2008
WHEN I FIRST heard that the Nutter administration would be cutting certain public libraries, I automatically knew the ones in the African-American communities would be targeted first (exception of the Fishtown branch). Mayor Nutter clearly understands the consequences behind challenging the Philadelphia Eagles' multibillion-dollar football stadium, which owes the city $8 million, or targeting the Mummers Parade, which are both white-folks recreational establishments. But because this mayor has developed a slave-master relationship with the white community in this city, his tenure will forever be in a form of psychosocial obedient debt to them for electing him. Unfortunately, resulting in the cutting of urban libraries where young African-American children go to access resources is no concern to this psychologically trained "Happy Negro" mayor.
NEWS
October 19, 2005 | By Claude Lewis
The speeches on the Mall in Washington on Saturday were wonderful. Thousands of African Americans gathered to hear them at the Millions More March, the 10th anniversary of the Million Man March. Louis Farrakhan, Jesse Jackson, and survivors of Hurricane Katrina spoke. Nearly every speaker said once again precisely what needed to be said. But now what? Frankly, I'm tired of listening to speeches and hearing brave people blasting and boasting into microphones about how African Americans can gather in great numbers without violence and dissent.
NEWS
April 28, 2010
I'M A SENIOR-citizen African-American woman married to the same African-American man for almost 40 years. As I read Jenice Armstrong's column, I wondered why there's such a problem addressing "The Elephant in the Room" when it comes to the dating issues facing black women. Why does no one just come out and tell the truth on the issue of skin hue and black men's overwhelming preference for light-white women? A black women may be educated, successful and everything else, but if she's of a "chocolate or licorice" hue, many black men will refuse to date her. It's OK for a man to be dark, but it's anathema for a woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before laying my head to rest the other night, Black Twitter blessed me with something magical. Scrolling through my feed, I noticed #unconventionalblackbeauty, a hashtag featuring photos of beautiful black faces. Not much different from #blackoutday, an online movement that celebrated black beauty, right? Wrong. The difference: This was an honest discourse about how we define beauty within the black community. In less than 24 hours, feeds exploded with photos of women and men with full lips, broad noses, and kinky hair.
NEWS
February 2, 1987 | By Roy Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Republican mayoral candidate John J. Egan Jr., who fared poorly among black voters in the 1983 mayoral election, attended a service at a black church yesterday, saying he would not "concede any community to any candidate. " Invoking the spirit of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Egan told members of Mount Olivet Tabernacle Baptist Church in West Philadelphia that the slain civil rights leader would have had a smile on his face if he had been in the church yesterday. "He would be amazed that a white man would be standing in front of a black congregation and imploring you to judge me by the content of my character and not the color of my skin," Egan said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Rashad Robinson
  'Look at my African American over here. " When Donald Trump pointed out a black man at a California rally, social media erupted: Here was a man running the most racist campaign in decades trying to use the language of diversity for electoral gain. But here's a dirty little secret: Trump's contradictions when it comes to black people are the norm in American politics. Politicians on both sides of the aisle have long used black communities as pawns in their political chess game, each capitalizing on the symbolism of "blackness" to serve their parties' electoral needs.
SPORTS
July 27, 2016
MAYBE IT'S because Michael Jordan was perceived as being hesitant to step into the social justice arena during his playing career that his statement on Monday concerning the nation's escalating racial divide seemed so extraordinary. Because Jordan is an intelligent and perceptive man, it is hard to imagine that his mentality was neutral toward the many black social issues that occurred during his tenure as the most popular black athlete on the planet. Because Jordan is an intelligent and perceptive man, it is easy to imagine that he understood the risks involved with being a social activist during his tenure as the most popular black athlete on the planet.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, Staff Writer
Dejenaba Gordon, 33, of Lindenwold, had a question for the police and community leaders gathered in Gloucester County on Monday evening in the aftermath of the deadly, racially charged sniper attack on police in Dallas. "I'm glad that this is happening," Gordon said to the room, and then, addressing the dozen police officers present, she added, "But my question is, when Alton Sterling was shot, did you gather and have a conversation about what's happening in the black community? What do we need to do to ensure our community feels comfortable?"
NEWS
June 1, 2016 | By Steve Bohnel, Staff Writer
JUST MORE than a mile north of Temple University, a 21,000-square-foot mosque is rising next to a struggling neighborhood in North Philadelphia. The 56-foot-tall structure stands on a former factory lot, next to Amtrak's main line that rolls through the neighborhood. The mosque, on West Glenwood Avenue near 13th Street, will serve Philadelphia's Ahmadiyya Muslim Community and its growing membership, said Bilal Salaam, its imam. It was designed by Olaya Studio, and was based on the White Minaret, an iconic symbol that represents the Ahmadiyya community in Qadian, India.
NEWS
May 21, 2016
ISSUE | RACIAL BIAS Mixed signals in killings of blacks The front-page story about Philadelphia police Sgt. Robert Wilson III receiving the Medal of Valor posthumously from President Obama for his heroic actions raises a puzzling question ("Obama honors slain Phila. officer," Tuesday). When a black man is shot or killed by a white person - whether a police officer or a citizen - there is outrage in the black community, sometimes resulting in riots. And civil rights leaders such as the Rev. Jesse Jackson and the Rev. Al Sharpton rail about the injustice of it. Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and Eric Garner are three recent examples.
NEWS
May 10, 2016
ISSUE | CIVIC LEADERS Three heroes gone Philadelphia lost three gentle giants in less than a week. Labor leader Samuel Staten Sr., educator Barbara Daniel-Cox, and political consultant William R. Miller IV will forever be missed. I speak on behalf of the hundreds of black leaders who are part of Philadelphia Community of Leaders and the thousands of Philadelphians who were touched by their work, lives, and purpose. Each had personal and professional lives. More importantly, they had an unparalleled commitment to the black community, leading by example.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | Sofiya Ballin, Staff Writer
Sofiya Ballin is an Inquirer staff writer This past week, I realized the N-word debate is gearing up to be as old as the word itself. Before comedian Larry Wilmore could even complete the second syllable of "nigga" at the end of his White House Correspondents' Dinner on April 30, a hailstorm of think pieces and tweets began to swirl. Many loved it or hated it. But here's why I wasn't offended by Wilmore's use of it to refer to the first black president of the free world.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Julia Terruso and Alfred Lubrano, STAFF WRITERS
Bill Clinton went off his stump-speech script Thursday at a Philadelphia rally for his wife, engaging in an exchange with two protesters over his 1994 crime bill and Hillary Clinton's impact on the African American community. The 42nd president even used the words that have become a battle cry - "black lives matter" - in describing his wife's efforts. He called on 400 supporters inside Dorothy Emanuel Recreation Center's gym in East Mount Airy to be part of a "big turnout" in Pennsylvania's April 26 primary.
NEWS
March 19, 2016
By Donte L. Hickman Recently, I had a conversation with a leading pastor about what is necessary to shift the trends and transform the urban centers of America. He shocked me by saying that he believes poverty is not the root cause of gang violence, substance abuse, and lethargy among some in the black community today - lack of faith is. He began to highlight our own individual upbringings in abject poverty and argued that he and I obviously were able to choose positive paths of productivity.
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