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NEWS
May 12, 2005
RE MICHAEL Smerconish's "Think Rodney King, but Upside-Down": He writes: "We'll be spared an insufferable visit to town by Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson and the rest of those who make a living doing nothing but stoking the fires of racial unrest. " I remember he wrote a column seemingly scolding the "black community" for the positive attention afforded Omarosa, the infamous reality-show contestant, by the likes of Oprah Winfrey and the NAACP, while puzzled that these two groups hadn't offered the same to Condoleezza Rice, a woman significantly more accomplished.
NEWS
June 17, 1999 | BY ANDREA D. JOHNSON
There seems to be a major loss in the black community. We feel it. We acknowledge it, see it - feel and recognize that we are not the same. We have succumbed to the marketing schemes of the manufacturers who cater to us and to the political wagon whose wheels we have changed, but it is the same buggy that carried us here.Take, for example, an incident that happened the other night in Germantown. It is unfortunate that one would have to call this unusual, but it is anymore. At the senior citizens building, someone was actually blasting gospel music.
NEWS
July 30, 2008
AMERICA IS a great country. What black people need to do is to get together - black churches and all other black groups - and do what we can to get our people to destroy their guns and their drugs. In their place, go to church. Turn to God up in heaven and also become a more educated people. Let's go to college and become well-educated people, and let's wear clean, decent-looking clothes. Let's have shaves and look decent at all times. Get off these corners. If mankind lived the way God intended, all the money we spend on wars is money that could be spent rebuilding the black ghettos.
NEWS
January 2, 1987 | BY LEON ARISTOTLE WILLIAMS
I am deeply concerned about the attempts of your paper to cast the United Black Business Association as anti-Asian. The picture you painted in a Dec. 15 article and a Dec. 16 editorial was grossly inaccurate and irresponsible. And Signe Wilkinson'sw editorial cartoon is proof that your paper either misunderstands the economic revolution in the black community or has embarked on a racist campaign to subvert that long-overdue revolution. Michael Sokolove's article states that "interviews with community leaders, merchants and others in the black community make clear the Asian business presence is breeding quiet resentment and sometimes outright hostility.
NEWS
December 22, 2008
WHEN I FIRST heard that the Nutter administration would be cutting certain public libraries, I automatically knew the ones in the African-American communities would be targeted first (exception of the Fishtown branch). Mayor Nutter clearly understands the consequences behind challenging the Philadelphia Eagles' multibillion-dollar football stadium, which owes the city $8 million, or targeting the Mummers Parade, which are both white-folks recreational establishments. But because this mayor has developed a slave-master relationship with the white community in this city, his tenure will forever be in a form of psychosocial obedient debt to them for electing him. Unfortunately, resulting in the cutting of urban libraries where young African-American children go to access resources is no concern to this psychologically trained "Happy Negro" mayor.
NEWS
October 19, 2005 | By Claude Lewis
The speeches on the Mall in Washington on Saturday were wonderful. Thousands of African Americans gathered to hear them at the Millions More March, the 10th anniversary of the Million Man March. Louis Farrakhan, Jesse Jackson, and survivors of Hurricane Katrina spoke. Nearly every speaker said once again precisely what needed to be said. But now what? Frankly, I'm tired of listening to speeches and hearing brave people blasting and boasting into microphones about how African Americans can gather in great numbers without violence and dissent.
NEWS
April 28, 2010
I'M A SENIOR-citizen African-American woman married to the same African-American man for almost 40 years. As I read Jenice Armstrong's column, I wondered why there's such a problem addressing "The Elephant in the Room" when it comes to the dating issues facing black women. Why does no one just come out and tell the truth on the issue of skin hue and black men's overwhelming preference for light-white women? A black women may be educated, successful and everything else, but if she's of a "chocolate or licorice" hue, many black men will refuse to date her. It's OK for a man to be dark, but it's anathema for a woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before laying my head to rest the other night, Black Twitter blessed me with something magical. Scrolling through my feed, I noticed #unconventionalblackbeauty, a hashtag featuring photos of beautiful black faces. Not much different from #blackoutday, an online movement that celebrated black beauty, right? Wrong. The difference: This was an honest discourse about how we define beauty within the black community. In less than 24 hours, feeds exploded with photos of women and men with full lips, broad noses, and kinky hair.
NEWS
February 2, 1987 | By Roy Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Republican mayoral candidate John J. Egan Jr., who fared poorly among black voters in the 1983 mayoral election, attended a service at a black church yesterday, saying he would not "concede any community to any candidate. " Invoking the spirit of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Egan told members of Mount Olivet Tabernacle Baptist Church in West Philadelphia that the slain civil rights leader would have had a smile on his face if he had been in the church yesterday. "He would be amazed that a white man would be standing in front of a black congregation and imploring you to judge me by the content of my character and not the color of my skin," Egan said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before laying my head to rest the other night, Black Twitter blessed me with something magical. Scrolling through my feed, I noticed #unconventionalblackbeauty, a hashtag featuring photos of beautiful black faces. Not much different from #blackoutday, an online movement that celebrated black beauty, right? Wrong. The difference: This was an honest discourse about how we define beauty within the black community. In less than 24 hours, feeds exploded with photos of women and men with full lips, broad noses, and kinky hair.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before laying my head to rest last night, Black Twitter blessed me with something magical. Scrolling through my timeline, I noticed the hashtag #unconventionalblackbeauty, featuring photos of beautiful black faces. Not much different from #blackoutday , an online movement that celebrated black beauty, right? Wrong. The difference here was this was an honest discourse about how we define beauty within the black community. And I was so here for it. In less than 24 hours, the hashtag has received a cosign from artist Talib Kweli and timelines exploded with photos of women and men with full lips, broad noses and kinky hair posing with pride.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kadiatou Diallo. Valerie Bell. Lesley McSpadden. Wanda Johnson. Carol Gray. Samaria Rice. They are among mothers whose sons have died in police-related violence. At that moment of loss and mourning, says photographer and educator Denise Allen, the media place a microphone in front of these mothers so they can talk about their dead sons. Allen has created "My Son Matters!," a project on display at the Mt. Airy Art Garage until the end of May. Striking portraits of black mothers with their sons decorate the gallery.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | David Gambacorta, Daily News Staff Writer
AS THE PRIMARY election season enters its final weeks, mayoral and City Council candidates will promise to solve just about any problem you can think of, especially in poor and disenfranchised communities. A coalition of local black leaders vowed yesterday to make sure those political hopefuls will walk the walk if they get into office. The Philadelphia Black Political Summit Coalition released a 20-page report containing numerous recommendations to improve the lives of minority residents in the city during a news conference at the African American Museum, at 7th and Arch streets.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin and Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writers
  On the epic finale of Empire , record mogul Lucious Lyon announced that performers - including Patti LaBelle, Rita Ora, and Snoop Dogg - would donate a percentage of their fees from a benefit concert to Black Lives Matter. It was another example of how - in the shadow of the deaths of unarmed black men at the hands of police officers, particularly in Ferguson, Mo., and Staten Island, N.Y. - current events have seeped into prime time. Television shows often exist in a world in which current events rarely have an effect on the plots.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
MUSLIMS Mobilized Against Police Brutality, a new organization in Philadelphia, expects hundreds of participants at a march and rally tomorrow in Center City. The event, organized by the Muslim Wellness Foundation, the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative and United Muslim Masjid, will begin at noon at 15th Street and JFK Boulevard. Kameelah Mu'Min Rashad, a coordinator, said the demonstration is designed to address police brutality directed against the black community. "Over the course of the last few weeks, we've been talking pointedly and having discussions about the political and social and legal implications of the events around Ferguson and New York and the psychological trauma evident in the black community as a result," she said.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
I DON'T LIVE in Ferguson, Mo., but I signed the national petition for Gov. Jay Nixon to name a special prosecutor to present evidence to the grand jury in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, 18. My online signature was No. 79,198. Grand juries favor the prosecution, and lawyers joke - although it's not a joke - that grand juries will indict a ham sandwich. It is Officer Darren Wilson who stands to be indicted. St. Louis County lead prosecutor Bob McCulloch, who will supervise the case against Wilson, said he will not step aside, but would not object to the governor appointing a special prosecutor.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A coalition of about 20 African American community activists announced plans Friday to develop an agenda for reducing poverty in Philadelphia's black community. Known collectively as the Philadelphia Community of Leaders, the group said during a news conference at Laborers District Council headquarters that it planned to address the difficult issue of poverty by focusing on improving education and economic development and reducing violence. The nonprofit group, which includes developers Kenny Gamble and Rahim Islam, lawyer George Burrell, antiviolence activist Bilal Qayyum, and former School Reform Commission Chairwoman Sandra Dungee Glenn, also announced it would host its first community conference at 8:30 a.m. Saturday at Universal Audenried High School, 3301 Tasker St. The event, which is open to the public, will allow members to present their issues and goals and engage members of the community, Islam said.
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILLINGBORO Jim Ayrer, an early homeowner in the suburban experiment conceived by developer William J. Levitt, has witnessed the changes that defined the community these last five decades. As a longtime resident, Ayrer watched the cookie-cutter houses and winding streets sprout from farmland and grow into a thriving township with 33,000 people. As an elected town councilman for 34 years, he also has seen the town's challenges: the deterioration and reimagining of the town's bustling shopping center and the empty houses that appeared on the landscape due to the recent real estate crash and recession.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
In 2011, at an after-school workshop about Black History Month at Mighty Writers, the Philadelphia nonprofit that teaches children how to write, Nefeesah Cannady posed a question. "Ever since I've been little, I've been hearing about Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks," Cannady, then a junior at Central High School, said. "I know everything about those people - they were great Americans. But how come I don't know anything about the black Philadelphians that came before me?" That question, said Mighty Writers founder Tim Whitaker, "triggered this idea about all these pioneering black DJs from the 1950s up until 1979 that are all but forgotten.
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