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Black Culture

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NEWS
May 10, 1987 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer
Safiya Hamid, 5, was enchanted by the painting: It stood twice as tall as she and showed Zulu warriors fighting red-coated British soldiers. "Those are African people in an African place," she murmured, stretching out a finger toward the painting. Outside the gallery at 2221 N. Broad St., where Safiya was sightseeing with her parents, a parade was going on with stilt-walkers and a marching band. But Safiya's brush with history and the boisterous parade had the same aim: celebrating black culture.
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | By Harry Belafonte
Having been born into poverty, I expected to live a life absent of opportunity. When you are poor and black and American, it is difficult to know who you are. In our search for identity, if we have no person of wisdom and courage to guide us, it is more than likely that our search will yield a meager harvest. . . . My fortunate deliverance from such consequences . . . mostly . . . can be ascribed to the generosity of a few voices from the world of black culture. They were most critical to my escape.
NEWS
February 1, 1987 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
A Black History Month observance featuring music, theater and films is scheduled to begin today at Gloucester County College with an open house for an exhibit of works by several nationally known black artists. "The purpose of Black History Month is to commemorate those blacks who have contributed to the American heritage, and also to celebrate and highlight . . . accomplishments of blacks," said Evelyn Webb, dean of student services at the college. Webb is also the president of the South Jersey chapter of The Links Inc., a national service organization of black women that does educational, civic and charitable work in the United States and abroad.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1991 | By Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Every February, all manner of educational, cultural, civic and artistic institutions gear up for Black History Month with a virtual blitzkrieg of programs and events that celebrate black culture and contributions. But for the Coalition of African-American Cultural Organizations, made up of 16 member organizations which hold up the banner the other 11 months of the year, February presents the same challenge as any other month - to continue to build institutional longevity. Since 1987, the coalition has dedicated itself to promoting and supporting organizations that preserve the artistic traditions of African-Americans within the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2010 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Everett Staten of Elkins Park, an events planner by trade, believes there is a continued need to remind the public about the positive aspects of African American culture from a grassroots level. His Black History Showcase gives "an opportunity for those who have wonderful private collections to show them off. " The special theme of this year's showcase, to be held at the Convention Center next weekend, Feb. 13 and 14, will be the history of blacks in sports, Staten said. There will be some Philadelphia-specific exhibits - one about basketball great Wilt Chamberlain, for instance, and another spotlighting the Philadelphia Stars baseball team, with visits from three of the original Stars: Mahlon Duckett, Harold Gould and Bill "Ready" Cash.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1990 | By Sara M. Lomax, Daily News Staff Writer
Years ago a kidnapper spirited Charles Burnett's grand-uncle away. A brick probably brought him back - or so the story goes. "(My grandmother) told me stories about how her brother was kidnapped," said Burnett. "Her mother went to this woman, who told her to put a brick with his name on it under the steps. A couple of weeks later she found him at the door. " Burnett has drawn on this storytelling tradition to weave the backdrop for his first commercially released movie, "To Sleep with Anger.
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | By NICHOLAS O. BERRY
Why do African Americans average over 100 points below whites on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)? This may not be a politically correct question, but it needs to be addressed. The answer, I propose, goes to the heart of why America now experiences heightened racial tensions. Some background first: I worked on a construction crew in the South with whites and blacks in the 1950s. For reasons I couldn't then explain, the blacks seemed smarter and better workers. In the 1960s I led the successful struggle to integrate the Democratic Party in Lynchburg, Va., and the blacks who served with me on the city committee performed with more skill, dedication and savvy than did whites.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
It was the collective "ewww"; heard around the Twitterverse. Miley Cyrus - a.k.a. former Disney innocent Hannah Montana - shocked even the unshockable during MTV's Music Video Awards Sunday, sending tweeters into overdrive when she bent over in her flesh-colored two piece and rubbed her hiney against Robin Thicke's crotch. Talk about blurred lines. What? Is she serious? Why does she have that big foam finger? And what in the heck is she doing? Twerking, baby. Here is a primer: Twerking can be done alone or with a partner.
SPORTS
June 12, 2015 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Columnist
IS EVAN MATHIS black? Chip Kelly's latest thunderclap move seems to further erode the unsophisticated claim of LeSean McCoy that Chippah prefers white players and coaches. Players don't come much whiter than two-time Pro Bowl left guard Evan Mathis, self-described Mathlete, Wielder of Mjolnor and sit-down comedian . . . and, now, unemployed former Eagle. No, this was more about the continued dissolution of individuality at the NovaCare Complex, where only one culture matters - not black culture or white culture, but Kelly culture.
NEWS
August 20, 2001
JAZZ STARS today just don't play sax the way John Coltrane did. A mural in his honor would be an inspiration to any neighborhood. It teaches children their black culture. I'm trying to get a mural put up next to a vacant lot. I would be more than glad to have his mural here. Dorothy L. Banner, Philadelphia
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SPORTS
June 12, 2015 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Columnist
IS EVAN MATHIS black? Chip Kelly's latest thunderclap move seems to further erode the unsophisticated claim of LeSean McCoy that Chippah prefers white players and coaches. Players don't come much whiter than two-time Pro Bowl left guard Evan Mathis, self-described Mathlete, Wielder of Mjolnor and sit-down comedian . . . and, now, unemployed former Eagle. No, this was more about the continued dissolution of individuality at the NovaCare Complex, where only one culture matters - not black culture or white culture, but Kelly culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
It was the collective "ewww"; heard around the Twitterverse. Miley Cyrus - a.k.a. former Disney innocent Hannah Montana - shocked even the unshockable during MTV's Music Video Awards Sunday, sending tweeters into overdrive when she bent over in her flesh-colored two piece and rubbed her hiney against Robin Thicke's crotch. Talk about blurred lines. What? Is she serious? Why does she have that big foam finger? And what in the heck is she doing? Twerking, baby. Here is a primer: Twerking can be done alone or with a partner.
NEWS
December 21, 2012
I NEVER 'GOT' rap. It just seemed like a musical version of the emperor's new clothes, where everyone around you is saying, "Wow, how outrageously innovative!" and all you hear is the sound a car makes when it's dying. To me, this is not art. Someone once suggested to me that this aversion to the genre was an innocent form of racism, in which an otherwise well-meaning white person fails to appreciate the nuance of black culture. My answer to that was along the lines of, "I don't believe black culture is all about baby mamas, drive-by shootings and getting high.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2012 | By Matt Huston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In its mission to draw inspiration from black culture in Philadelphia, an arts organization is offering its yearly breakout conversation among artists, writers and citizens. The 28th annual Celebration of Black Writing, which began Monday and continues until June 2, attracts creative people from many realms - performance and spoken-word artists, authors, editors, journalists, musicians and other cultural craftspeople. Its events cover a wide window of African-American artistic expression and technique, including performances, readings and film screenings, chick lit, advocacy journalism, urban fiction and black mental health.
NEWS
January 20, 2012
Johnny Otis, 90, "godfather of rhythm and blues" who wrote and recorded the R&B classic "Willie and the Hand Jive" and for decades evangelized black music to white audiences as a bandleader and radio host, died Tuesday in Altadena, Calif. Mr. Otis, who was white, was born John Veliotes to Greek immigrants and grew up in a black section of Berkeley, where he said he identified far more with black culture. He was leading his own band in 1945 when he scored his first big hit, "Harlem Nocturne.
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES - Johnny Otis, the "godfather of rhythm and blues" who wrote and recorded the R&B classic "Willie and the Hand Jive" and for decades evangelized black music to white audiences as a bandleader and radio host, has died. He was 90. Otis, who had been in poor health for several years, died Tuesday at his home in the Los Angeles foothill suburb of Altadena, said his manager, Terry Gould. Otis, who was white, was born John Veliotes to Greek immigrants and grew up in a black section of Berkeley, where he said he identified far more with black culture than his own. As a teenager, he changed his name because he thought Johnny Otis sounded more black.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mama Turner has died, and she hasn't been tucked away for more than a couple hours before the fighting between her two grown daughters begins. Her son tries to be the buffer, but old wounds still itch and burn, and aged Papa is too senile to understand what's going on. What's going on is gentrification in the African American neighborhood where the Turners built a family, raised their kids, watch their grandchildren - and then their great-granddaughter -...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2010 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Everett Staten of Elkins Park, an events planner by trade, believes there is a continued need to remind the public about the positive aspects of African American culture from a grassroots level. His Black History Showcase gives "an opportunity for those who have wonderful private collections to show them off. " The special theme of this year's showcase, to be held at the Convention Center next weekend, Feb. 13 and 14, will be the history of blacks in sports, Staten said. There will be some Philadelphia-specific exhibits - one about basketball great Wilt Chamberlain, for instance, and another spotlighting the Philadelphia Stars baseball team, with visits from three of the original Stars: Mahlon Duckett, Harold Gould and Bill "Ready" Cash.
NEWS
April 12, 2009 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Michelle Obama got rave reviews this month for the stylish choices she made overseas. With every new day, we saw her wearing another hip designer, like Isabel Toledo, Michael Kors, and Jason Wu. Yet many of the fashion-conscious are waiting to see what the first lady will don today. Easter, the holiest of Christian holidays, often has churchgoers breaking out their finest. Not only has the day traditionally meant new clothes, but for African Americans, it historically also has offered a chance to claim dignity within their own communities during times when they weren't respected by society at large.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2008 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There was a red carpet and red velvet rope outside the Prince Music Theater Thursday night. But inside, the color scheme was definitely - and celebratorily - black. A crowd of nearly 500, among them the Rev. Al Sharpton and Negro League baseball legend Mahlon Duckett, was on hand for the Philadelphia premiere of The Black List: Volume One - an extraordinary documentary featuring interviews with 22 prominent African Americans reflecting on issues of race, struggle and achievement.
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