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Black Eyed Peas

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FOOD
December 31, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Black-eyed peas, a staple in Southern diets for more than 300 years, have many names. They were originally called cowpeas, since they were widely used as cattle feed. They were brought to the West Indies from Africa, and by the 1700s were being grown extensively in Georgia. Hoppin' John, a humble dish that uses black-eyed peas and rice, has traditionally been associated with good luck when served on New Year's Day. It is widely held that this simple dish can be traced to slaves in Charleston, S.C., and on nearby rice plantations.
NEWS
December 30, 1988 | By Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
They're bracing for tomorrow's annual stampede of hog jaw munchers at G.I. Brothers Meats on Lancaster Avenue near 40th Street. "We'll sell more hog jaws the day before New Year's than the entire year put together," said owner Robert Fineman. "We got a ton of them - somewhere between 1,000 and 1,500 jaws. They'll all go tomorrow" And thanks to an old Southern tradition that refuses to die, grocers throughout the city will do a land-office business in black-eyed peas and collard greens, too. Sitting down to a plate full of black-eyed peas, cooked with a savory smoked hog jaw, and a side of collards is as much a part of New Year's for some Philadelphia families as strutting up Broad Street or waltzing to the Guy Lombardo Orchestra is for others.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2000 | By Lloylita Prout, FOR THE INQUIRER
While champagne and noisemakers are New Year's Eve essentials, here are two more musts - good company and black-eyed peas. And here's why. The person you are with as the clock strikes midnight is whom you will be with for the rest of the year, so make sure it's someone you can tolerate. As for the black-eyed peas, eating them at midnight will bring good luck. Whether either of these superstitions is true, who knows. But area clubs are offering both for folk-tale believers.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
While Black History Month traditionally focuses on events designed to inspire the soul and mind, students and staff at Burlington County College had something else in mind to wrap up February's black history activities at the school's main campus in Pemberton. What they had was an event designed to stick to the ribs. As in collard greens, ham hocks and black-eyed peas, chitterlings, pork barbecue, Southern- style potato salad, smothered chicken, cornbread and sweet potato pie. Whether you call it soul food or black cuisine, it's cooking "no one can resist," said Bruce Munson, a judge in the school's annual soul food cook-off and a member of the Black History Month Planning Committee, which sponsored the event.
NEWS
January 22, 1993 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Friday's lunch menu at the cafeteria of a big auto plant in Normal, Ill., offered meatloaf and egg rolls. It wasn't expected to cause a stampede by gourmets. But it was politically correct and sensitive. You never know where political correctness and sensitivity will rear its stern head. It's something new almost every day. This is how it came to the company cafeteria of the Diamond-Star Motors Corp. Some time ago, an executive asked the firm that operates the cafeteria to broaden the menu, offer more choices, provide some variety.
FOOD
December 25, 1996 | By Christine M. Carbone, FOR THE INQUIRER
The last thing most of us want to do on New Year's Day is cook. The day tops off the party season with laid-back get-togethers to watch bowl games and eat black-eyed peas. Here's a menu, then, to make ahead of time and reheat so you can settle in for the game and enjoy friends, too. To ease and accelerate preparation, use pre-made items and mixes where you can. Given that this is a "bowl" day, serve everything in bowls. Black-eyed peas are a must. These tiny, off-white African beans with a black "eye" are available canned and dried.
NEWS
February 26, 1988 | By Catherine Ross, Special to The Inquirer
While Black History Month traditionally focuses on civil rights leaders and black culture, the organizers of Burlington County College's activities have added a new twist: a Soul Food Cook-Off. The culinary competition, held yesterday in the college's cafeteria and sponsored by the Black History Month Planning Committee and the Educational Opportunity Front Advisory Board, added a dash of flavor to the monthlong celebration of black history and culture. About 40 students and employees of the Pemberton college got a taste of soul food - and some distant cousins - from the dozen entries in the contest.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013
COLLARD-GREEN SMOOTHIE Cherron Perry of the Dandelion Bunch has a fresh take on collard greens: Cut 3 to 4 fresh collard-green leaves into strips. Put 1 cup cold water and stevia to taste in a blender. Add 2 handfuls of the greens and 1 to 2 frozen bananas, and blend until smooth. For a thicker consistency, add 1 or 2 cups ice cubes. BLACK-EYED PEA FRITTERS Head over to Geechee Girl Rice Cafe (6825 Germantown Ave.) for an awesome remake of black-eyed peas using a food processor, dried peas, onions, bell pepper, cornmeal and seasonings.
FOOD
December 30, 1998 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Staff Writer
Certain soul foods get star billing New Year's Day, their place at the banquet guaranteed by a symbolism ladled out and joyfully consumed through the generations. Black-eyed peas supposedly bring good luck. Collard greens signify that other green stuff - money. White rice? Procreation, a continuation of the family and the race. Eat pig's feet and odds are you'll travel some in the New Year. "I cook collard greens in my house and black-eyed peas and rice every new year.
NEWS
January 1, 1993 | By Robin Clark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At 82, Effie Davis knows this much about New Year's: "If you go to eat black-eyed peas in my family, somebody's going to ask you, 'Where are the pig tails? Where are the greens? Where are the hog jowls?' " Ah, New Year's - a time when people ring out the old and ring in the new with such traditional foods as black-eyed peas (for luck), collard and turnip greens (for money) and sauerkraut (for health). Also a time to pity the poor pig, who winds up on so many platters, in so many ways, that the cadre of butchers at Red Joe's meats on Ridge Avenue say they sell "everything but the oink.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2015 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
LOTS OF health-focused juicers and smoothie machines were frothing up kale, pineapple, cucumber, spinach, mint and lemon-juice concoctions at the International Housewares Show, which ended yesterday in Chicago. But only one offered a royal chat and photo op with the most regal of weight-obsessed celebrities - Sarah Ferguson - the former spouse (till 1996) of Britain's Prince Andrew and still/forever the Duchess of York. "I didn't believe it till I tried it," Fergie whispered in this ear about the Fusion Xcelerator, a $99 liquefier, pulverizer and micro-emulsification system she's now touting in infomercials and on her poshly designed website - duchessdiscoveries.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013
COLLARD-GREEN SMOOTHIE Cherron Perry of the Dandelion Bunch has a fresh take on collard greens: Cut 3 to 4 fresh collard-green leaves into strips. Put 1 cup cold water and stevia to taste in a blender. Add 2 handfuls of the greens and 1 to 2 frozen bananas, and blend until smooth. For a thicker consistency, add 1 or 2 cups ice cubes. BLACK-EYED PEA FRITTERS Head over to Geechee Girl Rice Cafe (6825 Germantown Ave.) for an awesome remake of black-eyed peas using a food processor, dried peas, onions, bell pepper, cornmeal and seasonings.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | BY JUDY HEVRDEJS, BILL DALEY and JOE GRAY, McClatchy News
START 2013 RIGHT with food that symbolizes good luck. These easy appetizers are perfect for New Year's Eve or New Year's Day entertaining, too. "Long noodles are associated with long life and good health," said Hiroko Shimbo, author of Hiroko's American Kitchen (Andrews McMeel, $24.99). Here she turns soba noodles into sushi rolls. Pair with your favorite cold dipping sauce. Slice 1 medium mango, half an avocado and 1 peeled Kirby or pickling cucumber into 1/2-by-3 1/2-inch sticks.
NEWS
March 5, 2010 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
To their detractors, the Black Eyed Peas are a soulless hit machine, mechanically churning out chart-topping singles with subtext as shallow as a sideways CD. Their sold-out show at the Wachovia Center on Wednesday night seemed designed in part to answer their critics, not with a defense of their integrity but with a hearty "So what?" As the group's four vocalists emerged from a haze of green smoke, a robotic face on the screen behind them ran down a list of the show's components, as if it were an old PC booting up, step by step, and each Black Eyed Pea were just a subroutine within a giant computer program.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WHILE MOST people ponder the important questions of life like "Why am I here?" and "Why is the sky blue?" Tattle wonders: "Are more celebrities driving under the influence?" "Are we more aware of celebrities driving under the influence?" Or "Are there just too many celebrities?" The latest to get pulled over was Taboo (aka Jaime Luis Gomez) of the Black Eyed Peas, who was arrested on, what else, suspicion of driving under the influence. The crash was probably a clue.
NEWS
April 20, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
By the time Pharrell Williams of N.E.R.D. got around to inviting the Black Eyed Peas back on stage and asking the crowd at the Electric Factory to prepare for "the craziest party in history," the party was almost over. Along with Chad Hugo, Williams is half of the Neptunes, the most successful production team in current pop, with hits for artists ranging from Britney Spears to Busta Rhymes. With N.E.R.D. - an acronym for No One Ever Really Dies - Williams, Hugo and rapper Shae get to play at being rock stars.
FOOD
December 31, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Black-eyed peas, a staple in Southern diets for more than 300 years, have many names. They were originally called cowpeas, since they were widely used as cattle feed. They were brought to the West Indies from Africa, and by the 1700s were being grown extensively in Georgia. Hoppin' John, a humble dish that uses black-eyed peas and rice, has traditionally been associated with good luck when served on New Year's Day. It is widely held that this simple dish can be traced to slaves in Charleston, S.C., and on nearby rice plantations.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2000 | By Lloylita Prout, FOR THE INQUIRER
While champagne and noisemakers are New Year's Eve essentials, here are two more musts - good company and black-eyed peas. And here's why. The person you are with as the clock strikes midnight is whom you will be with for the rest of the year, so make sure it's someone you can tolerate. As for the black-eyed peas, eating them at midnight will bring good luck. Whether either of these superstitions is true, who knows. But area clubs are offering both for folk-tale believers.
FOOD
December 30, 1998 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Staff Writer
Certain soul foods get star billing New Year's Day, their place at the banquet guaranteed by a symbolism ladled out and joyfully consumed through the generations. Black-eyed peas supposedly bring good luck. Collard greens signify that other green stuff - money. White rice? Procreation, a continuation of the family and the race. Eat pig's feet and odds are you'll travel some in the New Year. "I cook collard greens in my house and black-eyed peas and rice every new year.
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