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NEWS
November 11, 1992
When the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated on Veterans Day a decade ago, Tom Wolfe denounced this "pit," this black granite wall, as "a tribute to Jane Fonda. " How could abstract art humanly represent the dead and missing? Jan Scruggs, the Vietnam corporal who conceived the idea, knew how. So did Maya Lin, the architecture student who won the design competition. Mr. Scruggs had a dual objective. That the memorial would both recognize and honor the dead. And that, once built, it would begin a process of reconcilation.
NEWS
April 27, 2012
AND THE WINNING design for a new memorial for fallen firefighters and police officers goes to . . . Roman Torres, Adam Montalbano and Eric Oskey of Moto Designshop in Old City! Their design, unveiled Thursday, is for a 110-by-80-foot commemorative site to be located near Franklin Square's main entrance, at 6th and Race streets. Visitors will walk, as if in a procession, toward a white marble cubelike structure - representing a firefighter's or police officer's badge - with a black stone band wrapped around the middle.
NEWS
November 11, 1988 | By Mike Capuzzo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Katakis was trapped in a slow, tortured parade of living "ghosts," his own word for them, the most honorable people he had ever known. Slowly, reluctantly and, finally, to the exclusion of most all else, he joined them, the thousands who file slowly past a slab of black granite, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington. Katakis, a Philadelphia-area photographer, came to pay his respects one day and found himself haunted by the wall, seeking a personal "closure" for which he could not find words.
NEWS
May 29, 1989
VISIT TO THE GENTLE WALL The walls are black granite, polished so smoothly you can see your hazy reflection on the surface. Maybe you want to touch the name of a friend or stranger, or maybe you want to cry. In either case, go ahead and do it. The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., is a participatory monument. Like the unpopular war itself, those who come into contact with the memorial leave something behind and return feeling different. Early this morning about 40 (Bethlehem, Pa., area residents)
NEWS
May 28, 1996 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. contributed to this article
The Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial was defaced yesterday. Again. Vandals darkened part of the monument's granite walls, marking at least the fourth time the memorial has been soiled since its opening in October 1987. The vandals struck early on the day most sacred to veterans, who did not discover the damage until yesterday morning - during preparations for a Memorial Day ceremony. "I was kind of exasperated to think that someone would do something like that," said Harry J. Gaffney, who helped establish the memorial.
NEWS
May 29, 1996 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
People who visit the granite walls of the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial often leave offerings for the dead - photographs, cigarettes, small flags, flowers. Yesterday, a police agency left one more - a large donation, to go toward repairing the damage caused by vandals on Memorial Day. The Police Pension Association of Pennsylvania, which represents about 6,000 retired officers - most of them from Philadelphia - yesterday presented a $5,000 check to members of the memorial's advisory board.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1996 | By Deni Kasrel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Maya Lin made headlines in 1981 when her design won a national contest for the newly proposed Vietnam Veterans Memorial, in Washington. There was much to make news of: She was a 21-year-old undergraduate at Yale University and was among 1,441 entrants, some of whom were prominent architects. And then there was the design itself - a stark, slightly bent slash of polished black granite, set into the ground, which some thought too simple and not patriotic enough. Some Vietnam veterans and politicians harshly denounced it. Outtakes from those heated, nasty press conferences are included in Freida Lee Mock's Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Vision.
NEWS
March 27, 1992 | By Nolan Walters, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
No tourists came to the Wall on the dawn of its second decade. It was a rare quiet time there. Nearly 25 million people have walked along the black granite Vietnam Veterans Memorial, seeing and feeling the inscribed names of dead family, friends and strangers. But yesterday, before the ceremony that marked the 10th anniversary of the ground-breaking for the memorial, the only visitors were rain and chirping flocks of spring robins. Gone were the buses and hawkers of POW/MIA T-shirts.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | By Amy Zurzola, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The four Audubon High School seniors had something to prove: To the people who seemed convinced that young people only make trouble, to the naysayers who said it couldn't be done, and most of all, to themselves. Now, less than a year later, their proof stands like a sentry in five-foot- high black granite, bathed in floodlights under a balmy summer sky. "We had no idea what we were getting ourselves into," said Anthony Simeone, 18. Simeone and the three other students led Project Memorial, a campaign to erect a monument to Audubon's three Medal of Honor recipients, raising more than $14,000 in donations.
NEWS
May 30, 2010 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It had been a war against somber emotion for hours Saturday, among men, women, even children, standing yards from the roiling ocean, a backdrop of kites and amusements nearby. Some wiped tears. Some sniffled. Some out-and-out wept. There had been a fighter-jet flyover, dignified flag raisings, a couple of renditions of "God Bless America" and "The Star-Spangled Banner. " Rousing speeches and tributes had made some in the crowd of about 10,000 introspective. And when the black drapes were finally lifted from Wildwood's permanent replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall, the crowd stood nearly silent for a moment, taking in the magnitude of the more than 58,000 names carved in black granite to honor those killed in Vietnam.
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NEWS
April 27, 2012
AND THE WINNING design for a new memorial for fallen firefighters and police officers goes to . . . Roman Torres, Adam Montalbano and Eric Oskey of Moto Designshop in Old City! Their design, unveiled Thursday, is for a 110-by-80-foot commemorative site to be located near Franklin Square's main entrance, at 6th and Race streets. Visitors will walk, as if in a procession, toward a white marble cubelike structure - representing a firefighter's or police officer's badge - with a black stone band wrapped around the middle.
NEWS
May 30, 2010 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It had been a war against somber emotion for hours Saturday, among men, women, even children, standing yards from the roiling ocean, a backdrop of kites and amusements nearby. Some wiped tears. Some sniffled. Some out-and-out wept. There had been a fighter-jet flyover, dignified flag raisings, a couple of renditions of "God Bless America" and "The Star-Spangled Banner. " Rousing speeches and tributes had made some in the crowd of about 10,000 introspective. And when the black drapes were finally lifted from Wildwood's permanent replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall, the crowd stood nearly silent for a moment, taking in the magnitude of the more than 58,000 names carved in black granite to honor those killed in Vietnam.
NEWS
May 30, 2010 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILDWOOD - It had been a war against somber emotion for hours Saturday, among men, women, even children, standing yards from the roiling ocean, a backdrop of kites and amusements nearby. Some wiped tears. Some sniffled. Some out-and-out wept. There had been a fighter-jet flyover, dignified flag raisings, a couple of renditions of "God Bless America" and "The Star-Spangled Banner. " Rousing speeches and tributes had made some in the crowd of about 10,000 introspective. And when the black drapes were finally lifted from Wildwood's permanent replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall, the crowd stood nearly silent for a moment, taking in the magnitude of the more than 58,000 names carved in black granite to honor those killed in Vietnam.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1996 | By Deni Kasrel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Maya Lin made headlines in 1981 when her design won a national contest for the newly proposed Vietnam Veterans Memorial, in Washington. There was much to make news of: She was a 21-year-old undergraduate at Yale University and was among 1,441 entrants, some of whom were prominent architects. And then there was the design itself - a stark, slightly bent slash of polished black granite, set into the ground, which some thought too simple and not patriotic enough. Some Vietnam veterans and politicians harshly denounced it. Outtakes from those heated, nasty press conferences are included in Freida Lee Mock's Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Vision.
NEWS
May 29, 1996 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
People who visit the granite walls of the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial often leave offerings for the dead - photographs, cigarettes, small flags, flowers. Yesterday, a police agency left one more - a large donation, to go toward repairing the damage caused by vandals on Memorial Day. The Police Pension Association of Pennsylvania, which represents about 6,000 retired officers - most of them from Philadelphia - yesterday presented a $5,000 check to members of the memorial's advisory board.
NEWS
May 28, 1996 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. contributed to this article
The Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial was defaced yesterday. Again. Vandals darkened part of the monument's granite walls, marking at least the fourth time the memorial has been soiled since its opening in October 1987. The vandals struck early on the day most sacred to veterans, who did not discover the damage until yesterday morning - during preparations for a Memorial Day ceremony. "I was kind of exasperated to think that someone would do something like that," said Harry J. Gaffney, who helped establish the memorial.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | By Amy Zurzola, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The four Audubon High School seniors had something to prove: To the people who seemed convinced that young people only make trouble, to the naysayers who said it couldn't be done, and most of all, to themselves. Now, less than a year later, their proof stands like a sentry in five-foot- high black granite, bathed in floodlights under a balmy summer sky. "We had no idea what we were getting ourselves into," said Anthony Simeone, 18. Simeone and the three other students led Project Memorial, a campaign to erect a monument to Audubon's three Medal of Honor recipients, raising more than $14,000 in donations.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | By Karen McAllister, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
About a week before the end of the Persian Gulf war, Army Staff Sgt. Tony R. Applegate suffered shrapnel wounds in his head, received 12 stitches and was told to return home. Instead, he chose to stay on as a gunner on one of the Second Armored Division's tanks. Two days before the cease-fire, Applegate died from friendly fire. He was 28. "He had the opportunity to come back," said his father, Henry Applegate. "But he wouldn't; that's just the way he was. I'd like to kick his butt for it. " Applegate and Dolly Bellomy, the soldier's mother, were at Freedoms Foundation in Valley Forge, where veterans and active troops gathered yesterday to honor the eight soldiers from the Second Armored Division, along with a civilian, who died in the gulf war. Officers praised the division's fighting in Iraq and Kuwait and asked everyone to remember those who didn't return.
NEWS
November 11, 1992
When the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated on Veterans Day a decade ago, Tom Wolfe denounced this "pit," this black granite wall, as "a tribute to Jane Fonda. " How could abstract art humanly represent the dead and missing? Jan Scruggs, the Vietnam corporal who conceived the idea, knew how. So did Maya Lin, the architecture student who won the design competition. Mr. Scruggs had a dual objective. That the memorial would both recognize and honor the dead. And that, once built, it would begin a process of reconcilation.
NEWS
March 27, 1992 | By Nolan Walters, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
No tourists came to the Wall on the dawn of its second decade. It was a rare quiet time there. Nearly 25 million people have walked along the black granite Vietnam Veterans Memorial, seeing and feeling the inscribed names of dead family, friends and strangers. But yesterday, before the ceremony that marked the 10th anniversary of the ground-breaking for the memorial, the only visitors were rain and chirping flocks of spring robins. Gone were the buses and hawkers of POW/MIA T-shirts.
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