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Black History Month

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NEWS
February 14, 1988 | By Mary Anne Janco and Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Delaware County colleges and school districts are celebrating Black History Month with activities ranging from appearances by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Rita Dove and political activist Paul Robeson Jr. to a variety of musical and educational programs. Dove, who won a Pulitzer Prize for poetry last year, will read from her works at 11:30 a.m. Feb. 23 in Room 101 of the main building of Penn State University's Delaware County campus in Middletown. Robeson will speak about his late father, Paul Robeson, at 2 p.m. Saturday at Lang Auditorium at Swarthmore College.
NEWS
February 11, 1988 | Special to The Inquirer / MICHAEL KATAKIS
Community activist Velma Mitchell (right) and John Shelton, president of the Chester Branch of the NAACP, accept a resolution from the Delaware County Council commemorating February as the 62d annual Black History Month. The County Council met Feb. 2, and unanimously passed a resolution giving February's celebration the theme of "Black Americans and the Struggle for Excellence in Education. " The council also cited several organizations for their participation in the month's celebration.
NEWS
February 1, 1988 | By Maida Odom, Inquirer Staff Writer
Today begins Black History Month, the period annually set aside to recognize the contributions of African-Americans and increase awareness of a black heritage that for many years was concealed because of racism. Philadelphia, an important location for black historical development and a key cultural center, will host one of the nation's most impressive assemblages of events celebrating black achievement - including about 200 exhibits, musical presentations and lectures. Among the activities planned this month will be a speech by Charles Blockson, curator of the Afro-American Collection at Temple University, on his book, The Underground Railroad.
NEWS
February 14, 2000 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Students throughout the region are celebrating Black History Month with special events. Students at The Shipley School, a private school in Bryn Mawr, recently enjoyed performances by the school's handbell choir and singing groups. There was also a poetry reading and a performance by a jazz band. Oakmont Elementary School, part of the Haverford Township School District, recently hosted a Jazz Assembly. Students learned about the history of jazz and were permitted to handle the instruments.
NEWS
February 14, 1988 | By Bridgett M. Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
As president of the Black Student Union of Pennsylvania State University's Ogonz Campus, VonEric Saunders faced a challenge when deciding which speakers to invite to his school for Black History Month. The sophomore from Springfield knew the population of blacks in Montgomery County was small - less than 5 percent. Black student enrollment at the university's Ogonz campus is also slight - 210 out of more than 3,500 students. What could he plan that would simultaneously attract a cross-section of people and honor black Americans' achievements?
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Soon after Black History Month became a February fixture in the mid-1970s, professional stages in big cities around the country began to pick up on it, and for a time it seemed as though a growing canon of African American-themed plays would be available - but only in February. As that collection of work has become richer and audiences have become more diverse, February has become a less visible month for such productions. Indeed, many artistic directors say they believe that relegating plays about race or African Americans to one month a season minimizes not just the work but the talent pool of black theater artists.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | By Karen Auge, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
A few are off the beaten path, but there are commemorations of Black History Month to be found in Bucks County. Perhaps the most notable will be a staging of Lyrics of the Hearthside, an award-winning portrait of African American writer Paul Laurence Dunbar, at 8 p.m. Feb. 21 at Bucks County Community College. The one-man show, written and performed by Joseph Mydell, depicts the life of Dunbar, a 19th-century writer and son of a former slave who struggled with racism and alcoholism and produced a highly regarded collection of short stories and poems before he died of tuberculosis at 34. According to publicist Karen Price Benson, the production marks a renewed effort by the college to sponsor activities celebrating Black History Month.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 1, 2016
Beyonce's black is showing ... and so is President Obama's. That may come as a shocker to some folks - hence the hilarious Saturday Night Live skit earlier this month parodying America's surprise at seeing the blonde-tressed singer showcase her African American roots during her controversial halftime at the Super Bowl . You may recall how she purportedly paid homage to the Black Panthers and Malcolm X. Hot-sauce-in-her-bag swag,...
NEWS
February 28, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
Filmmaker and Villanova University educator Hezekiah Lewis 3rd was looking for a way to take the textbook feel out of Black History Month and imbue it with lessons about African American lives here-and-now, unremarked but hardly unremarkable. In late January, Lewis and a small team of communications students and media professionals began summoning area residents - 29 in all - to the college TV studio, sat them down under the lights, and let the cameras roll on their little-heard achievements.
NEWS
February 18, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
On the freezing-cold morning of Feb. 17, 1887, a Bensalem carpenter walking by an ice pond noticed a parcel wrapped in brown paper and marked "handle with care. " Inside, he found a male torso of indeterminate race. The limbs and head were nowhere in sight. So begins Hannah Mary Tabbs and the Disembodied Torso , the new book by historian and African studies scholar Kali Nicole Gross. It's the type of tale you don't often hear during Black History Month: the biography of an antiheroine who made her way in the world through violence, deception, and adultery.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
On the freezing-cold morning of Feb. 17, 1887, a Bensalem carpenter walking by an ice pond noticed a parcel wrapped in brown paper and marked "handle with care. " Inside, he found a male torso of indeterminate race. The limbs and head were nowhere in sight. So begins Hannah Mary Tabbs and the Disembodied Torso , the new book by historian and African studies scholar Kali Nicole Gross. It's the type of tale you don't often hear during Black History Month: the biography of an antiheroine who made her way in the world through violence, deception, and adultery.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | Jenice Armstrong, Daily News
Parents, do your kids a favor and take them to see Race , the film about the Olympic runner that opens Feb. 19. No, scratch that. Take everybody. Take your nieces and nephews, your neighbors' kids, and all the children on your block. Why? A lot of kids don't know who the heck Jesse Owens even was . On Thursday, I asked a couple of students, including a junior at Carver High School of Engineering and Science in North Philadelphia: Do you know anything about Jesse Owens?
NEWS
February 2, 2016
Black History Month, celebrated each February, routinely draws attention from legislative bodies at all levels. Why, just last week the state House unanimously passed a resolution in recognition of Black History Month, honoring Army Brig. Gen. Charles Hamilton, an African American. Never mind that he's not a historical figure but is very much alive at the Philadelphia Navy Yard as Defense Logistics Agency troop support commander. Still a nice gesture, one of many such measures passed each year.
NEWS
February 1, 2016
Sofiya Ballin is an Inquirer staff writer I learned the most about black history in whispered tones while my mother braided my hair, after school when my father listened to talk radio, as my grandmother grated coconut, and at the dinner table set with shades of brown and opinion. In those moments I learned of the rise and destruction of Black Wall Street, the inhumanity of the Tuskegee Experiment, the tales of Angola's Queen Nzinga, the triumph of Queen Nanny of the Jamaican Maroons, and the Haitian revolution.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By SOFIYA BALLIN, Staff Writer
I LEARNED THE most about black history in whispered tones while my mother braided my hair, after school when my father listened to talk radio, as my grandmother grated coconut, and at the dinner table set with shades of brown and opinion. In those moments I learned of the rise and destruction of Black Wall Street, the inhumanity of the Tuskegee Experiment, the tales of Angola's Queen Nzinga, the triumph of Queen Nanny of the Jamaican Maroons, and the Haitian revolution. I learned that black history crossed continents and spanned languages, creating dialects that sang.
SPORTS
February 13, 2015
THE EAGLES found themselves being widely ridiculed on social media yesterday when a number of people and media outlets, including TMZ and Deadspin, noticed that the 2015 team calendar features a photo of wideout Riley Cooper illustrating February. February is Black History Month. Cooper, of course, made headlines in the summer of 2013 when video footage surfaced of him using the "N-word" during a dispute at a Kenny Chesney concert. He ended up apologizing to fans and teammates. "We do not oversee the production of the annual team calendar," the Eagles said in a statement released yesterday afternoon.
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