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NEWS
June 2, 2004
JUNE IS Black Music Month and . . . Huh? Black Music Month? Isn't every month Black Music Month? Well . . . er . . . no. You see... Come on. Sure seems that way. Every time you turn on the TV or radio, you see or hear Beyonce or Kanye West or OutKast. That guy Usher, you know, the one who dances like Michael Jackson, his record is big. Two of the three "American Idols" have been black. Blacks are all over the music scene, and you need a month to recognize that? Look, African American Music Month, now Black Music Month, was created 26 years ago by broadcast exec Ed Wright and Philly's own Kenny Gamble to honor, support and advance black music.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
No wonder Jack White hates the Black Keys. Just like the White Stripes, the duo White used to play in with his drumming ex-wife, Meg, the Black Keys are a rock tandem formed around the turn of the millennium with the cojones to attempt to build a mass audience in a hip-hop-pop-country-electro world the hopelessly old-fashioned way: by playing the blues. The Black Keys - guitarist-singer Dan Auerbach and drummer Patrick Carney, Akron, Ohio, natives who, like White (who has frequently disparaged them publicly)
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
British folk-rock band Mumford & Sons, blues-rock duo the Black Keys, and the pop band fun. won big at the Grammy Awards on Sunday, where no single act emerged as a dominant force. Mumford & Sons won album of the year for its strummy sophomore release, Babel . Fun. took home best new artist and song, for "We Are Young," its collaboration with Janelle Monáe. The Belgian-Australian singer Gotye and R&B singer Frank Ocean were also significant winners at the 55th annual Grammys, at the Staples Center in Los Angeles.
NEWS
November 14, 2005 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Any time you think of "The Black Keys," you also think of "The White Stripes. " It's only natural. Both are Midwestern minimalist garage-blues bands with just two members. Both have a theatrical flair, despite their spare, raw style. Both have a front man with a mop of messy hair. Yet, when Akron's dirtballish Black Keys - guitarist/singer Dan Auerbach and drummer Patrick Carney - sold out the TLA Friday night, they showed off stripes lovelier than the Whites. Standing before a glittering curtain, the duo kicked immediately into primal, wild abandon.
NEWS
May 19, 2008 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
While the Akron, Ohio, duo the Black Keys are often labeled minimalists, because of their bare-bones guitar and drums lineup, the truth is their sound is anything but minimal. Reveling in their Rust Belt roots, the band takes a blue-collar approach to blues rock, hard-driving and no-nonsense. For Friday's sold-out show at the Electric Factory, guitarist Dan Auerbach dressed in a gas-station mechanic's work shirt and performed in front of an enormous inflatable tire, in tribute to their hometown's once-thriving rubber industry.
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | By Jonathan Valania, For The Inquirer
Given the expansive economies of the '90s, it was no wonder that stripped-down, gutbucket guitar-and-drum duos such as Flat Duo Jets and Doo Rag couldn't get arrested, their minimalist roots-rock exiled to the subbasements of the indie concert circuit and the privileged ghetto of college radio. But in this age of austerity, when everyone is doing more with less, it is stripped-down, gutbucket guitar-and-drum duos such as The White Stripes and, more recently, The Black Keys, that have made some of the most seminal and commercially viable music.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2011
The Daily Show With Jon Stewart (11 p.m., COM) - Ralph Fiennes. Conan (11 p.m., TBS) - Michael Moore; comic Sean Patton. Late Show With David Letterman (11:35 p.m., CBS3) - Jessica Biel; Tom Dreesen; The Black Keys perform. The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (11:35 p.m. NBC10) - Lea Michele; Adam Carolla; Neil Diamond performs.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
Partial list of winners at Sunday's 55th annual Grammy Awards Record of the Year: "Somebody That I Used to Know" Gotye, featuring Kimbra Album of the Year: Babel Mumford & Sons Song of the Year: "We Are Young" fun., featuring Janelle Monáe Best New Artist: Fun. Best Pop Duo/Group Performance: Gotye, featuring Kimbra "Somebody That I Used to Know" Best Pop Solo Performance: Adele "Set Fire to the Rain (Live)"...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2015 | Dan DeLuca, Staff Writer
When the Arcs, the Nashville rock band fronted by Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys, were scheduling a Paris date for their European tour last month, they could have played in either of two 1,500-capacity venues. "Our French promoter said, 'I had you playing at Bataclan for a while,' " Auerbach, talking on the phone from his home in Nashville, recalls as he prepares for the Arcs' first American tour, which comes to the Fillmore on Wednesday. " 'But then I switched you,' he said. 'The two venues are basically the same.
NEWS
June 8, 2009 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
They may be New Yorkers for five nights a week, but the Roots still know how to make their hometown feel loved. Saturday's Roots Picnic at Festival Pier was a sprawling, sweaty thank-you gift to the city they call Illadelph. The Roots themselves opened the all-day affair with a short set before ceding the stage to a wide swath of friends and fellow travelers, including Public Enemy, TV on the Radio, Asher Roth, and Santigold, not to mention New Kids on the Block's Donnie Wahlberg and Jordan Knight, who stopped by on their way to a show in Camden.
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NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Jonathan Valania, For the Daily News
In the course of Marc Ribot's critically acclaimed four-decade career, the chameleonic guitarist has mapped a steady path from edgy lower Gotham upstart to Zen-like American master. Long a fixture of New York's downtown improv scene, Ribot is probably best known as Tom Waits' longtime side-man, having played on seven Waits albums and corresponding tours since 1985's Rain Dogs . He has lent his six-string sorcery to recordings by Elvis Costello, Robert Plant, the Black Keys, John Zorn, Philadelphia-born soul legend Solomon Burke, and the late, great beat poet Allen Ginsberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2015 | Dan DeLuca, Staff Writer
When the Arcs, the Nashville rock band fronted by Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys, were scheduling a Paris date for their European tour last month, they could have played in either of two 1,500-capacity venues. "Our French promoter said, 'I had you playing at Bataclan for a while,' " Auerbach, talking on the phone from his home in Nashville, recalls as he prepares for the Arcs' first American tour, which comes to the Fillmore on Wednesday. " 'But then I switched you,' he said. 'The two venues are basically the same.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2015 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she was growing up, Amy Black spent a lot of time in the Muscle Shoals, Ala., area. "I went to visit my grandparents there constantly," the Missouri native recalls from her new home in Nashville. "I just have a ton of memories, really good memories, from my times down there. " Despite all those visits to northern Alabama - she also lived there for two years before her family moved to Boston when she was 15 - Black had little knowledge of Muscle Shoals' rich musical history. Now, as a late-blooming singer-songwriter with an appealing Bonnie-Raitt-meets-Mary-Chapin-Carpenter style, the 43-year-old Black is extending the legacy with her new album, The Muscle Shoals Sessions . Recorded at the FAME studios and featuring keyboardist Spooner Oldham, a longtime stalwart of the scene, the album finds Black offering terrific versions of some of the vintage soul and R&B numbers recorded in Muscle Shoals, such as Arthur Alexander's "You Better Move On" and Mel and Tim's "Starting All Over Again," as well as Bob Dylan's "Gotta Serve Somebody," the Black Keys' "Tighten Up," and the old spiritual "You Gotta Move," inspired by the Rolling Stones version on Sticky Fingers . "It's so amazing to me that the Rolling Stones came to Sheffield, Alabama, and recorded music right across from where my whole family is buried," Black says.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
  AC/DC   , Jack White and Drake will headline the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in April. The fest also will include Interpol , David Guetta and Florence + the Machine . It takes place in a desert in Indio, Calif., and there will be numerous photos of stars dressed like hippies. AC/DC, which released a new album last month, will headline on April 10 and 17. White will perform on April 11 and 18. Drake takes the stage on April 12 and 19. Tickets go on sale today.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Now that the White Stripes are long gone and the Black Keys have expanded into a larger, swarthier ensemble, it looked as though the Kills - comprising vocalist/guitarist VV, also known as Alison Mosshart, and guitarist/vocalist Hotel, or Jamie Hince - would be left to sound the bell for skuzz-blues punk duos. Every release, from their 2002 debut EP, Black Rooster, to 2011's Blood Pressures , signaled that the pair were dipped in Floridian blues mud, then Southern-fried. At least until Wednesday night at the Trocadero, that is. Before a packed all-ages house, the once-dirtball, rail-thin blues kids morphed into slick, slithering rockers more imbued with the flashy spirit of the New Wave (think Elastica or Divinyls)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
No wonder Jack White hates the Black Keys. Just like the White Stripes, the duo White used to play in with his drumming ex-wife, Meg, the Black Keys are a rock tandem formed around the turn of the millennium with the cojones to attempt to build a mass audience in a hip-hop-pop-country-electro world the hopelessly old-fashioned way: by playing the blues. The Black Keys - guitarist-singer Dan Auerbach and drummer Patrick Carney, Akron, Ohio, natives who, like White (who has frequently disparaged them publicly)
NEWS
September 14, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
COME FALL, the live-music focus moves back indoors - and with more emphasis on midline acts, who know enough to keep out of the sun and the way of touring superstars' summer extravaganzas. Philly will be treated to a heady and overwhelming bunch of shows. Trust us when we say these "picks" just skim the surface. Rap poet laurete Nas' concert/documentary pairing, New Zealand pop charmer Kimbra's World Cafe gig and Bob Dylan's return to the Academy of Music loom large on our radar screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
For all the talk of New England singer/songwriter Ray LaMontagne's folksy craft and winsome ways, in 2014 the gentle beardo with the raspy voice and nicely rhapsodic vibes has added dramatic psychedelia to his mix. At first, LaMontagne's dip into hallucinogenic waters could only be found on his new album, Supernova , produced by Black Keys' Dan Auerbach. But with Saturday's show at Camden's Susquehanna Bank Center, LaMontagne proved he was taking Supernova 's tip and moving toward trippy Timothy Leary-inspired sights and sounds to go with his heartfelt emotionalism - an electric Kool-Aid acid test with maple syrup replacing the psilocybin.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Angelina Jolie for president! American Idol legend Clay Aiken has made a nice debut in politics, so why shouldn't Angelina Jolie enter the game? Aiken just won a Democratic congressional primary in North Carolina. But don't expect Jolie to throw her hat in the ring. "You know, if I thought I'd be effective, I would," Jolie, 38, on Wednesday told Good Morning America . "But I'm not sure if I would ever be taken seriously in that way, and be able to be effective.
NEWS
August 18, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Sometimes a unique voice - a boldly odd and enticing tone - comes along and yanks the most jaded listeners from their bubble of indifference. Think of the first time you heard Billie Holiday, Antony, Nina Simone, or Bob Dylan, voices that were/are captivating beyond the notion of being merely pleasurable. Count Tennessee-born Valerie June among those vocalists, with a creaking, emotive sound blending Dinah Washington's shushing jazz inflections and Dolly Parton's high nasal whine into an extravagantly funky chatter.
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