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Black Kids

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NEWS
April 18, 1989 | By Kurt Heine and Leslie Scism, Daily News Staff Writers
Many of Philadelphia's black children - increasingly poor, pregnant, plagued by drugs, mistreated by their parents and dependent on government handouts - are growing up in the toughest times since slavery, several scholars said yesterday in a report called "The State of Black Philadelphia. " State Welfare Secretary John F. White Jr. called the plight of the city's children "another kind of bondage. " He and other experts who participated in the Urban League's eighth annual report on black Philadelphia focused much of the blame on drugs.
NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By YVETTE OUSLEY
EVERY TIME I read about some new craziness involving young people in our city, one of the first thoughts that comes to mind is that they need their asses whupped - and so do some of their parents. The most basic truth that we all have to understand is this: Home is the first teacher and parents head these homes. But when we look at the number of troubled youths flash-mobbing or running into people's homes and attacking them, it shows exactly what their homes are - teaching. Black parents too often are giving their children everything, and ask nothing in return.
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | BY LINDA WRIGHT MOORE
I want a Big Brother who respects others as well as himself, someone who is sports-oriented, down to earth, married with children and outgoing and free spirited . . . Plus he must be middle-aged: 27 to 35. - Jared While his definition of middle age may draw a chuckle, Jared's description of the kind of companionship he yearns for is typical of the boys waiting to be "matched" with a volunteer through the Big Brother/Big Sister Association of...
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
At first glance, Charles Upchurch appears to be the most unlikely person to introduce youngsters to the game of golf. He's a perpetual "duffer," has a mean slice, a nasty hook, a terrible stance, can't remember ever getting a par, sometimes confuses birdies and bogies, and considers what he calls "squirrel hoppers" among his best shots. But glance again and you'll see a spry, spunky, spirited great-grandfather who "simply loves the game" and hits the ball of life long and down the middle every time.
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | By Alexis Moore, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Flying toward New York, where he would announce his resignation from one of the most powerful organizations in the world, William H. Gray 3d tried to explain. "I think educating black kids is more important than personal ambition," said the House majority whip and the most powerful African American member of Congress, who was about to accept the presidency of the United Negro College Fund. "The mission of the UNCF is so compelling and so attractive that I could not turn down the offer," Gray, 49, said yesterday morning.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | By Lawrence Otis Graham, From the New York Times
During a recent visit to my old junior high school, I came upon something that I never expected to see again: the all-black lunch table in the cafeteria of my predominantly white suburban junior high school. As I look back on 27 years of often being the first black person integrating such activities and institutions as the college newspaper, summer music camps, our suburban neighborhood, my eating club at Princeton or my private social club at Harvard Law School, the scenario that puzzled me the most then and now is the all-black lunch table.
NEWS
August 21, 2009
LET'S HAVE black teachers teach black kids, white teachers teach white kids - Asians, Latinos, American Indians, etc. It's amazing how peaceful it would be in schools and how better-educated the kids would be. Another idea! Let's live only with people of our own race. Sonia Marrero, Philadelphia
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer
PROFESSOR MATTHEW Delmont set out to write about how the '50s dance show "American Bandstand" was an integrated bastion of pop culture, where Philadelphia's black and white teens mixed and mingled on television even though the rest of the country was bitterly divided by race. Then he discovered his entire premise was dead-wrong. In the resulting book, The Nicest Kids in Town , this assistant professor of American studies at Scripps College in Claremont, Calif., details how "American Bandstand" kept African-American teens off the show, despite host Dick Clark's later claims to the contrary.
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | BY DONALD KAUL
Relations between the races are always delicate, always dangerous. The least little nudge can tip them out of balance, spilling hatred into the street. But you can't blame every black and white fight on race alone. Some people are equal opportunity haters. For example, the recent murder of a black man in the Bensonhurst section of Brooklyn attracted national attention as a racial incident. He went to the Italian Bensonhurst neighborhood in search of a used car. He was set upon by a gang of local thugs, viciously beaten and shot to death.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | BY DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
WHEN HE WAS 13, Rich Negrin saw his Cuban-activist father gunned down by anti-Castro terrorists. He held him as he died, kneeling in the street covered with his father's blood. After he became a father himself, Negrin watched his 5-year-old daughter die in 2006 after a lifelong battle with an incurable neuromuscular disease that devastated her ability to breathe. Every day, the memory of his father and his daughter inspires the city's powerful managing director to reach out to its least powerful residents, and try to help.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 13, 2016
PLEASE BE INFORMED that I consider myself as a small part of the solution to the divisiveness and upheaval currently ravaging our nation. I speak in particular about the killing of African-Americans and law-enforcement officials, as well. While marching and mass protest can be effective and ineffective, depending on the emotional climate and subject matter, I embrace another alternative which is more intimate. I start with examining my heart to make sure that I hold no malice, ill will or hatred toward anyone.
NEWS
February 7, 2016
Joan Myers Brown, 84 Founder of Philadanco Having been raised in the period of segregation, I went to an all-Black school up until seventh grade, where we were taught "Black History" as a part of our studies; however, there was never a discussion about the history of blacks in the arts. Being introduced to dance in the second grade by the all-white 4H Club members, I never thought there was a "history" I should know about. And when I was invited to join the ballet club in high school, all I learned was white ballet dance history.
NEWS
December 3, 2015
THE DAILY NEWS ' recent editorial "Who Do They Work For?" continues to propagate the myth that the natural-gas industry is not taxed. Politicians on both sides of the aisle have recognized that the industry is taxed - in addition to business taxes, including Pennsylvania's highest-in-the-nation corporate rate, drillers also pay impact fees on their wells. This impact tax brings in approximately $230 million annually, providing critical funding to local communities in every county across Pennsylvania.
SPORTS
March 2, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
The kid wanted to have some fun with his friends at a basketball game, so he put on a banana suit and hopped around in the front row of the boisterous Holy Spirit High School student section. Two things to keep in mind: 1. This was three years ago. 2. The kid is black. "It's just ridiculous," Ray Ellis said of the criticism that has been leveled at his old high school after two Holy Spirit students followed his example and tried to have some fun of their own during a Feb. 18 game against archrival Atlantic City.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY CHAD DION LASSITER
Google Maps a few weeks ago identified much of North Philadelphia as "Temple Town. " Temple University's encroachments upon North Philadelphia should no longer be shocking for it is real. While Temple University has officially denied any connection to this renaming, it appears clear that Temple University and developers are carving out a white enclave that in effect is no longer North Philadelphia. Most black folks will be unwelcomed. What Temple wants is a white enclave of racial and class privilege.
SPORTS
August 22, 2014 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. - It was the game everyone wanted to see. Chicago's 6-5 win over the plucky Taney Dragons in the Little League World Series losers' bracket elimination game was, at its extreme, a beacon of hope. It sent Chicago to the U.S. final tomorrow against Las Vegas. It sent Taney home . . . but only after the gritty dozen made themselves Little League legends, thanks largely to the demographic they share with Chicago. They are two Little League programs whose presence here refuted the common assumptions: Inner-city kids, especially black kids, don't like baseball because, compared with basketball and football, it's slow and boring and there are few black stars in the major leagues.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
AS EXPECTED, I got a lot of reaction from last Tuesday's column about the black Florida teen who was shot to death by a white man for refusing to turn down his "thug music. " Most comments reflected America's enduring inability to acknowledge racial disparities. "Why doesn't your paper ever write about white victims?" We do. "Why are you trying to start a race riot?" I'm not. "What, are you trying to be Philly's Al Sharpton?" Low blow, people. You try taming this hair.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
SO NOW there's apparently an addendum to the Handbook for Raising Black Sons. In addition to having the talk about how not to come across as a danger or a threat to . . . anyone, there's now a socially acceptable way to behave when those lessons are still not enough to protect your child. I was channel surfing this weekend when I briefly landed on CNN and heard conservative pundit Ben Ferguson's comments on the Jordan Davis case. Davis was the unarmed black Florida teenager who in 2012 was killed by Michael Dunn, a white man who shot Davis for refusing to turn down his "thug music.
NEWS
February 7, 2014
I REMEMBER watching a made-for-television movie in 1973 that changed my life. Not that I had much of it to change at the age of 11. Still, it grabbed me by the throat in the way that only a poorly filmed, terminally earnest public-service announcement ever could. "Go Ask Alice" was based on the book that every parent wanted every adolescent to read, and is still a necessary part of growing up. Some people think it's too simplistic, something along the lines of a Nancy Reagan "just say no to the bad drugs" riff.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
NEAL McLAURIN remembers taking the 33 bus to the movies as a kid with his parents and seeing a man living on the street, thick with layers of clothing. He couldn't understand it. Less than two decades later, he understood all too well. McLaurin was in his 20s and homeless, sleeping at Broad and Arch streets in 2007, when a mother and her child walked by. The way the little boy looked at McLaurin is the way he had looked at the homeless man as a kid. The way the mother grabbed her son is the way his mother had grabbed him. "So, I was that man that I'd seen all those years ago and it hit me," McLaurin said.
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