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Black Lung

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NEWS
April 4, 2012 | By Vicki Smith, Associated Press
MORGANTOWN, W. Va. - Proposed changes to U.S. Department of Labor rules would make it easier for coal miners and their families to obtain black-lung benefits, while a West Virginia congressman aims to reduce the amount of paperwork they have to fill out in the first place. The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - dubbed "Obamacare" by critics - requires the Office of Workers' Compensation Program to reinstate two provisions of the Black Lung Benefits Act that were eliminated in 1981.
NEWS
December 7, 1988 | By Jeffrey Marx, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Coal producers will be spared potential payments of billions of dollars to miners disabled with black lung disease, but a limited number of miners may be eligible for additional benefits under a Supreme Court ruling issued yesterday. By a 5-4 vote, the court overturned a lower-court ruling that could have opened the way for more than 100,000 miners to claim more than $13 billion in benefits. Those miners did not appeal legal decisions soon enough to be heard, the court ruled. At the same time, the court said that certain miners with pending black lung claims may now be eligible for millions of dollars in benefits.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A city medical examiner told a Philadelphia jury Wednesday that a woman who died during an abortion performed by Kermit Gosnell had no lung problems or other diseases that would have contributed to her death. Assistant Medical Examiner Gary Collins will return to the witness stand Thursday in the continuing medical-legal debate about what killed Karnamaya Mongar. Mongar, 41, of Virginia, died during the Nov. 19, 2009, abortion at Gosnell's Women's Medical Society clinic in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Life was rarely easy for Martha Keating even before her husband, John, died in 1978 at age 48, his lungs devastated by the black dust he inhaled working in the coal mines near Scranton. Since then, she said, she has had to cope with her own deteriorating health, two heart attacks and money problems that have left her without enough to eat and at times forced her to skip medication. Through it all, she said, what kept her going was the hope of getting her husband's survivor benefits under the Federal Black Lung Benefits Act. Keating had applied for the "widow benefits" right after her husband's death.
NEWS
January 30, 1987 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Staff Writer
The vice chairwoman of the state Republican Party testified yesterday that a Scranton couple charged with starving an elderly man to death and draining his bank accounts had asked her to try to influence Attorney General LeRoy S. Zimmerman to halt the murder investigation. Anne Anstine, vice chairwoman of the state Republican Executive Committee and an executive officer in the state Senate, said Helen Pestinikas and her husband, Walter, made that request twice in February 1985.
NEWS
October 28, 1992 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: Is there any new information you can pass on regarding COPD? I'm being treated with prednisone for sarcoidosis of the lungs and wonder how long I can stay on the steroids. A: There's not much new information about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which is marked by increased production of bronchial mucus and trapping of stale air within the lungs. COPD is a common, late consequence of cigarette smoking and air pollution. Also, it's often the end result of occupational exposure, such as black lung (in miners)
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | By Virginia S. Wiegand, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Ted Souchuck Sr. looks back on it all now, on the decades he and relatives and friends spent in the anthracite coal mines in northeastern Pennsylvania, he still gets emotional. He's angry about the pitifully low wages, the terrible conditions and the thousands of men and boys who were maimed or killed - or survived to die of black lung disease. But he's proud, too. "It was a hard life. It was awful, but they did it to feed their families," he said. Now Souchuck, 74 and semiretired from his lumberyard in Shenandoah, is leading a drive to raise $125,000 for a miners' memorial like the wall for Vietnam veterans in Washington.
NEWS
September 4, 1987
It's probably incorrect to assume that no one in Homestead, Pa., has ever heard of the U.S. Constitution. After all, Homestead is only about 350 miles from Philadelphia, and word of the document that governs the nation must have reached this 5,000-person Pittsburgh suburb some time in the last 200 years. But it's obvious that Homestead police haven't been told about the amendment saying blacks are now U.S. citizens, no longer considered three- fifths of a person, and so, are entitled to the same civil liberties as everyone else.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A city medical examiner told a Philadelphia jury Wednesday that a woman who died during an abortion performed by Kermit Gosnell had no lung problems or other diseases that would have contributed to her death. Assistant Medical Examiner Gary Collins will return to the witness stand Thursday in the continuing medical-legal debate about what killed Karnamaya Mongar. Mongar, 41, of Virginia, died during the Nov. 19, 2009, abortion at Gosnell's Women's Medical Society clinic in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Witnesses said abortion patients at Dr. Kermit Gosnell's West Philadelphia clinic got to pick their anesthesia: one-size-fits-all doses that ranged in strength from "local" to "custom. " The "custom" formula - a potent cocktail of Demerol, promethazine, and diazepam - that Karnamaya Mongar got several doses of on Nov. 19, 2009, kept her unconscious throughout the abortion. It also put her in a coma and killed her, Pittsburgh anesthesiologist Andrew Herlich told a Philadelphia jury Thursday at Gosnell's murder trial.
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NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A city medical examiner told a Philadelphia jury Wednesday that a woman who died during an abortion performed by Kermit Gosnell had no lung problems or other diseases that would have contributed to her death. Assistant Medical Examiner Gary Collins will return to the witness stand Thursday in the continuing medical-legal debate about what killed Karnamaya Mongar. Mongar, 41, of Virginia, died during the Nov. 19, 2009, abortion at Gosnell's Women's Medical Society clinic in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A city medical examiner told a Philadelphia jury Wednesday that a woman who died during an abortion performed by Kermit Gosnell had no lung problems or other diseases that would have contributed to her death. Assistant Medical Examiner Gary Collins will return to the witness stand Thursday in the continuing medical-legal debate about what killed Karnamaya Mongar. Mongar, 41, of Virginia, died during the Nov. 19, 2009, abortion at Gosnell's Women's Medical Society clinic in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Witnesses said abortion patients at Dr. Kermit Gosnell's West Philadelphia clinic got to pick their anesthesia: one-size-fits-all doses that ranged in strength from "local" to "custom. " The "custom" formula - a potent cocktail of Demerol, promethazine, and diazepam - that Karnamaya Mongar got several doses of on Nov. 19, 2009, kept her unconscious throughout the abortion. It also put her in a coma and killed her, Pittsburgh anesthesiologist Andrew Herlich told a Philadelphia jury Thursday at Gosnell's murder trial.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Witnesses said abortion patients at Dr. Kermit Gosnell's West Philadelphia clinic got to pick their anesthesia: one-size-fits-all doses that ranged in strength from "local" to "custom. " The "custom" formula - a potent cocktail of Demerol, promethazine, and diazepam - that Karnamaya Mongar got several doses of on Nov. 19, 2009, kept her unconscious throughout the abortion. It also put her in a coma and killed her, Pittsburgh anesthesiologist Andrew Herlich told a Philadelphia jury Thursday at Gosnell's murder trial.
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | By Vicki Smith, Associated Press
MORGANTOWN, W. Va. - Proposed changes to U.S. Department of Labor rules would make it easier for coal miners and their families to obtain black-lung benefits, while a West Virginia congressman aims to reduce the amount of paperwork they have to fill out in the first place. The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - dubbed "Obamacare" by critics - requires the Office of Workers' Compensation Program to reinstate two provisions of the Black Lung Benefits Act that were eliminated in 1981.
SPORTS
August 26, 2010
WE SHOULD CARE, and we do. We all want to enjoy a long and healthy life, and most of us wish that for everyone else. Still, the harsh truth is that this will not change things. The other day, we learned that former Eagles fullback Kevin Turner was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - Lou Gehrig's disease. There is no cure for ALS, and the 41-year-old Turner said he as been told by various doctors that he has anywhere from 2 to 15 years to live. Turner said he believes the disease is a result of playing football.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Life was rarely easy for Martha Keating even before her husband, John, died in 1978 at age 48, his lungs devastated by the black dust he inhaled working in the coal mines near Scranton. Since then, she said, she has had to cope with her own deteriorating health, two heart attacks and money problems that have left her without enough to eat and at times forced her to skip medication. Through it all, she said, what kept her going was the hope of getting her husband's survivor benefits under the Federal Black Lung Benefits Act. Keating had applied for the "widow benefits" right after her husband's death.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | By Virginia S. Wiegand, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Ted Souchuck Sr. looks back on it all now, on the decades he and relatives and friends spent in the anthracite coal mines in northeastern Pennsylvania, he still gets emotional. He's angry about the pitifully low wages, the terrible conditions and the thousands of men and boys who were maimed or killed - or survived to die of black lung disease. But he's proud, too. "It was a hard life. It was awful, but they did it to feed their families," he said. Now Souchuck, 74 and semiretired from his lumberyard in Shenandoah, is leading a drive to raise $125,000 for a miners' memorial like the wall for Vietnam veterans in Washington.
NEWS
October 28, 1992 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: Is there any new information you can pass on regarding COPD? I'm being treated with prednisone for sarcoidosis of the lungs and wonder how long I can stay on the steroids. A: There's not much new information about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which is marked by increased production of bronchial mucus and trapping of stale air within the lungs. COPD is a common, late consequence of cigarette smoking and air pollution. Also, it's often the end result of occupational exposure, such as black lung (in miners)
NEWS
December 7, 1988 | By Jeffrey Marx, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Coal producers will be spared potential payments of billions of dollars to miners disabled with black lung disease, but a limited number of miners may be eligible for additional benefits under a Supreme Court ruling issued yesterday. By a 5-4 vote, the court overturned a lower-court ruling that could have opened the way for more than 100,000 miners to claim more than $13 billion in benefits. Those miners did not appeal legal decisions soon enough to be heard, the court ruled. At the same time, the court said that certain miners with pending black lung claims may now be eligible for millions of dollars in benefits.
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