CollectionsBlack Market
IN THE NEWS

Black Market

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Brian Palmer, SLATE
Thieves stole hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of paintings by Picasso, Monet, Gauguin, and Matisse from a museum in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, early Tuesday. Since everyone knows the paintings are stolen, it's impossible to sell them at auction. So how do thieves profit from a high-profile art heist? The black market. Most stolen art work goes underground. The thief sells his haul to an unscrupulous art dealer, who usually sells it on to a private collector who keeps it for a while.
NEWS
March 19, 2000 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This city is a gangster's circus. Smugglers cart Lucky Strikes amid the war ruins. Unemployed engineers press out pirate CDs. Government ministers pocket kickbacks from oil deals. And every week or so, the bloody demise of a wiseguy in a black leather jacket becomes grist for the morning papers. There is little here left uncorrupted. A brief war with NATO that began a year ago and 10 years of international sanctions have spawned a sinister economy in this nation of 10 million.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Flavia Krause-Jackson and John Walcott, Bloomberg News
The fall of Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi has touched off a race to secure his arsenal of portable, terror-ready weapons such as shoulder-fired antiaircraft missiles, and part of the solution may be for the United States and its allies to go out and buy them. There is evidence that a few Soviet-made SA-7 antiaircraft missiles from Gadhafi's arsenal have reached the black market in Mali, where al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb is active, said two U.S. government officials not authorized to speak on the record.
NEWS
February 17, 1994 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kira Prgovski needs to go shopping, but she doesn't have much in the way of money. What she does have is two bags of powdered milk donated by a humanitarian organization. In an economy hobbled by war, just about anything becomes a commodity that can be sold or bartered for more desirable goods. So 28-year-old Kira leaves her 7-week-old son at home with his father, throws the powdered milk in her shopping bag and ventures to the Markale - the indoor hall where a black market thrives.
NEWS
October 29, 1987 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
The way witness Gary Whitlock described it to District Justice John S. Murray 3d last week, his ill-fated venture into the automotive industry's black market began with a quest for a new engine and transmission for his 1986 Chevrolet Monte Carlo. It ended in his arrest. Two Wyndmoor business people who Whitlock and police say helped Whitlock transfer parts from a stolen car to his Monte Carlo also were arrested after Springfield police responded to an anonymous tip Sept. 21. Police said they discovered someone cutting a new car to pieces in one of the bays at Rent-A- Bay at Ivy Hill and Queen Roads.
NEWS
January 28, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - After lifting a ban on porcupine hunting, the Pennsylvania Game Commission ran into a thorny problem: reports of a new black market for the rodents' meat in Southeast Asia. Intelligence reports indicated that people were seeking Pennsylvania porcupines to sell illegally for human consumption in Vietnam, commission officials said. The eight-member commission responded this week by reversing course and ending a nine-month-old policy of virtually unlimited porcupine hunting during most of the year.
SPORTS
June 17, 2012
The International Olympic Committee has launched an investigation into allegations that Olympic officials and agents are selling tickets to the London Games on the black market. The IOC called an emergency meeting of its executive board Saturday in Geneva, Switzerland, after the Sunday Times newspaper in the United Kingdom presented a dossier of evidence on 27 officials controlling the tickets for 54 countries. The newspaper said several thousand tickets to the best events - including the men's 100-meter track final - had been put up for sale by national Olympic committees from their official ticket quotas.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | By Timothy Dwyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cabbage is everywhere. Carrots and cabbage, and there were cucumbers for a while and then they disappeared. Potatoes? Who knows where those things went. Fidel Castro went out to the potato fields himself to praise all the doctors, lawyers and bureaucrats who had "volunteered" to help pick the record potato crop, and for a while there were plenty of potatoes on the otherwise empty supermarket shelves and then they just vanished one day. Leaving only the cabbage. For a while there were chickens - no, not roasting chickens, but live baby chicks that the government grocers decided to just give away to the people of Cuba because, according to several consumers, the government figured out that it would be cheaper for the state if its citizens got chicks and raised them themselves, and so now all you hear at dawn is the cock-a-doodle-doo of next summer's supper.
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nadezhda, who is 65 and usually doesn't work the black market, just couldn't resist. So yesterday she was at Victory Square with other illegal sellers, quietly trading Ukrainian karbovanetz notes for Russian rubles and doubling her money with each trade. The surprise decision in Russia over the weekend to stop using rubles printed before 1993 has set off a minor panic in the former Soviet republic of Ukraine, where many people have old rubles, but the banks have stopped accepting them.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Brian Palmer, SLATE
Thieves stole hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of paintings by Picasso, Monet, Gauguin, and Matisse from a museum in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, early Tuesday. Since everyone knows the paintings are stolen, it's impossible to sell them at auction. So how do thieves profit from a high-profile art heist? The black market. Most stolen art work goes underground. The thief sells his haul to an unscrupulous art dealer, who usually sells it on to a private collector who keeps it for a while.
NEWS
September 30, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
AFORMER Main Line housekeeper accused of stealing a rare bust of Benjamin Franklin valued at more than $3 million was denied bail on Friday. Andrea Lawton, 46, who was arrested in Maryland on Sept. 21 by the FBI while in possession of the bust, must remain in custody pending trial. U.S. Magistrate M. Faith Angell deemed Lawton, 46, who showed up in court in a black head scarf and an olive prison jumpsuit, to be a flight risk. According to court papers, Lawton had told FBI and IRS agents that she had come to Maryland to sell the bust on the black market.
SPORTS
June 17, 2012
The International Olympic Committee has launched an investigation into allegations that Olympic officials and agents are selling tickets to the London Games on the black market. The IOC called an emergency meeting of its executive board Saturday in Geneva, Switzerland, after the Sunday Times newspaper in the United Kingdom presented a dossier of evidence on 27 officials controlling the tickets for 54 countries. The newspaper said several thousand tickets to the best events - including the men's 100-meter track final - had been put up for sale by national Olympic committees from their official ticket quotas.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - After lifting a ban on porcupine hunting, the Pennsylvania Game Commission ran into a thorny problem: reports of a new black market for the rodents' meat in Southeast Asia. Intelligence reports indicated that people were seeking Pennsylvania porcupines to sell illegally for human consumption in Vietnam, commission officials said. The eight-member commission responded last week by reversing course and ending a nine-month-old policy of virtually unlimited porcupine hunting during most of the year.
NEWS
November 3, 2011 | By Tom Hays and Stephen Braun, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A Russian arms dealer accused of evading authorities for years while fueling violence in war zones around the globe was convicted Wednesday in a U.S. courtroom on charges he conspired to sell weaponry to South American terrorists. Viktor Bout, known as the Merchant of Death, showed no emotion as a jury forewoman read guilty verdicts on each of four conspiracy counts. The conviction could result in a life sentence. Jurors had deliberated six hours over two days in federal court in Manhattan.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Flavia Krause-Jackson and John Walcott, Bloomberg News
The fall of Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi has touched off a race to secure his arsenal of portable, terror-ready weapons such as shoulder-fired antiaircraft missiles, and part of the solution may be for the United States and its allies to go out and buy them. There is evidence that a few Soviet-made SA-7 antiaircraft missiles from Gadhafi's arsenal have reached the black market in Mali, where al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb is active, said two U.S. government officials not authorized to speak on the record.
NEWS
July 5, 2011 | By Paul Haven, ASSOCIATED PRESS
HAVANA - Want some paprika-infused chorizo sausage? How about a bit of buffalo mozzarella? Or maybe you just need more cooking oil this month, or a homemade soft drink you can afford on paltry wages. Perhaps you are looking for something more precious, such as an imported air conditioner or some hand-rolled cigars at a fraction of the official price. In a Marxist country where virtually all economic activity is regulated, and where supermarkets and ration shops run out of such basics as sugar, eggs and toilet paper, you can get nearly anything on Cuba's thriving black market - if you have a "friend," or the right telephone number.
NEWS
June 1, 2010 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
For millions of native-born Puerto Ricans living on the island or abroad, July 1 looms as a critical date. "They say we need new birth certificates" beginning that day, 72-year-old Jose Cabrera said between rounds of Pokeno at a heavily Latino senior center on Norris Square in North Philadelphia. "But I don't know if this will bring a solution to the problem. " The problem: rampant identity theft by Hispanic immigrants - often from the Dominican Republic - who use stolen Puerto Rican birth certificates to obtain U.S. passports, Social Security benefits, and other federal services available to Puerto Ricans because they are U.S. citizens.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|